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$1.6 Million and Counting

Double Fine's Kickstarter has been a massive success. Patrick caught up with Tim Schafer to talk budgets, expectations and 40,000 backers.

Double Fine's Kickstarter is at $1.6 million already, and there's still nearly a month left.

Tim Schafer was pretty nervous a week ago.

Just last month, an unannounced project had been cancelled at his studio, Double Fine Productions. Rather than laying anyone off, Schafer kept them on board, hoping a risk would pay off.

That risk was pitching a project to his fans that no publisher had ever seen. Schafer wanted to make a brand-new, traditional graphic adventure--the kind of game that made people fall in love with his sense of humor, long before they ever knew who he was.

Double Fine hoped to raise $400,000 through Kickstarter, a fairly new online service that allows anyone to pitch in their own money to make an idea a reality. The response was explosive. In one night, the Kickstarter hit $400,000. In 24 hours, it passed $1 million. As of right now, it's more than $1.6 million, with still a few weeks to go.

The Kickstarter launched while Schafer was attending the annual DICE Summit in Las Vegas with Double Fine producer Greg Rice and Iron Brigade project lead Brad Muir. Schafer had a few minutes on Friday afternoon, and was able to wrestle an iPad from Rice so he could chat with me about a roller coaster couple of days.

Naturally, because there were other people in the room, he had to talk to me from his hotel bathroom. Naturally.

Giant Bomb: How are you doing? I’m sure you’ve been asked that a million times, but I have to imagine your head space is changing every five minutes, considering your Kickstarter is changing every two seconds.

Tim Schafer: Now, I’m totally used to it, and I’m actually getting kind of upset that there’s money in the world that we don’t have. [laughs] I’m starting to think about all the money that’s not gone there yet because it’s easier to count.

It’s been incredible. It’s been amazing. I just wish I was at the office because every time I call the office, and I can tell from the emails, that everyone was just bouncing off the walls at Double Fine, and they had champagne and they were refreshing the screen and they crashed Kickstarter [from] refreshing it so much, and they hit a million and they all started screaming. I Skype’d in and I was listening to them, and the speaker just got all fuzzy because they were all screaming. It was exciting, it was really exciting.

GB: Was the plan always to do it this week, when you wouldn’t be around while all of this happened?

Schafer: No, no. We were just trying to get it done as soon as we could, and we wanted to get it done so we would be able to talk about it at GDC and stuff, because the thing goes for 30 days. We hadn’t realized it would become...like, I thought it would take all 30 days. I thought, in the first night, we’d be lucky if we hit $2,000--and we hit $400,000 in the first night. I didn’t expect for it to become a phenomenon while we were at DICE, but it’s fun because I know that everybody here, whenever they’re trying to plug their new games, has to answer questions about Kickstarter now. “I want to talk about Skyrim!” “Nooooo, are you going to fund the next Skyrim on Kickstarter?” People have to deal with that annoying question.

GB: You’re just trying to make Todd Howard’s life a living hell for the rest of DICE.

Schafer: [laughs] Yep.

GB: Did you actually think it would take 30 days?

Schafer: Yeah. Everybody told us that $400,000 was too high for our Kickstarter because most of the games on Kickstarter are a lot less expensive than that, and there have been Kickstarter projects that have approached a million dollars, but no one had hit a million dollars like that. The first one to hit a million dollars hit four hours before ours hit.

GB: The iPhone dock.

Schafer: But they were on the last day of their 30 days, right? They were at the end of their Kickstarter when they hit that, and we hit it on our first day. Not to be rubbing it in or anything! [laughs]

If you haven't played Day of the Tentacle, make these recent events a reason to finally dive in.

GB: It hits a million in 24 hours, but how far out did you scope where this could go? As you were planning this, was there a dream scenario where “What if we end up with a couple million dollars?”

Schafer: Uh, planning in advance...where is the microphone on this thing? Can you hear me okay? I just realized I was talking into the speaker. Ugh.

GB: I’m just imagining your face really close to the iPad, trying to speak sweet nothings into it.

Schafer: What was I saying? Oh, yeah. Planning ahead has never been a big forte of Double Fine. People were saying $400,000 was [too big]. Originally it was going to be $200,000, which is like an iPhone game. And I was like “Well, if we could just do something on Kickstarter for the fans, it would be fun, and it would be fun to make that documentary.” To go back to the beginning, people have talked about doing Kickstarters before, you know? A lot of people have brought this up.

GB: You guys have actually talked about it?

Schafer: It’s just been a buzz thing. For the past year, a lot of people have been talking about Kickstarter. Around our office, people have brought it up. At the time, our budgets for [games like] Stacking and Costume Quest were like $2 million, and Once Upon a Monster was more than that. I was like “We can’t make $2 million on Kickstarter, that’s crazy.” And then those guys from 2 Player Productions came to interview me for the Minecraft documentary they were filming. I got to know them, and they said “Hey, maybe we can do a documentary about Double Fine next,” and then we started talking about how they could fund the documentary on Kickstarter.

We were talking about what game we could have access to because if we were using one of the games in production, the publisher might not like that, they might not like their coverage of that being so broad. We were worried about secrets and unannounced stuff and all the hassles of getting approval for everything, so we thought: “Let’s just start a new project and we could have Kickstarter fund that, too.”

It was kind of out of necessity that we came up with a game--it was kind of as a sidenote. I was still nervous about, you know, if we just said “Hey, we’re making a game, give us $2 million.” That would have been hard. But then I thought about adventure games, and now that makes it an interesting proposition for fans because they’re able to fund something that we couldn’t have done without them. We could not have gone to a publisher and said we wanted to make a graphic adventure--at all. Maybe if we were only asking for $100,000 or something.

With $1.6 million raised so far, the Kickstarter is approaching the budget for Grim Fandango.

GB: Have you tried?

Schafer: I haven’t pitched a straight classic adventure. It’s just not worth it. I know, for a fact, [they would say no].

GB: You know the answer upfront, so it’s not even worth trying.

Schafer: Exactly. Maybe that leaves me open to all the publishers saying “Hey, we would have done this.” That relationship is all just something I didn’t really want, because when you have a publishing relationship, sometimes it works out great because you have aligned goals and you want to make the same thing, like with Happy Action Theater. Microsoft wanted to show what Kinect could do, and I was interested in that, too. That worked out great.

If we’re making an adventure game, you know a publisher would have mentioned “Maybe you should add an action sequence, or put a gun in it, or, I don’t know, maybe that character looks too old, you should make her younger.” These kinds of things. I don’t have to do any of that if I just go to the fans and have their trust and be like “Hey, I want to make something that’s really creative and cool, are you into it?” And they’re into it to a greater degree than I’d even hoped.

GB: Does the project change now that you have all this money? Do you start thinking you can do something larger, maybe it's episodic? Or is that something you figure out when you’re back at the office?

Schafer: We do, but we’ve been thinking about how...at first, at the earlier, smaller budget, it was going to be a cool, cute, little fun game, but it would probably be kind of hobbled as far as adventure games go. It wouldn’t have compared Day of the Tentacle or our old games because it was going to be a fraction of the price. But we’ve now passed the Day of the Tentacle budget, even if you’ve adjusted for inflation, we’ve passed Monkey Island 1 & 2 combined, we’ve passed the Happy Action Theater budget, and we’re almost, I haven’t checked recently, but we’re almost at $1.1--almost at $1.5, which is the Full Throttle budget. If we pass the Full Throttle budget, then the next thing we’re looking at is the Stacking and Costume Quest budgets and beyond that, Grim Fandango, at $3 [million].

Oh, I just told you all my secrets! [laughs]

GB: Well, I sent a note to Greg [Rice, producer at Double Fine] earlier saying “Hey, Tim’s tweeting all those budgets, just send me a list of the budgets!”

Schafer: Well, I do want to tweet those out, but go ahead, I told you.

GB: You didn’t give me all the numbers, so you can still have your fun. But as you go along this budget path, eventually you hit a pretty big gap, right? You probably get as high as Grim Fandango or something, but the jump to a Brutal Legend or a Psychonauts is huge. On Reddit, there’s an image of someone asking you about the gap to get to Psychonauts 2 from what you’re currently at with the Kickstarter, and you mentioned it being something like $19 million more dollars. How seriously do you entertain those thoughts? It’s really easy to see people start running away with this. How do you ground yourself?

Schafer: I’ve been very surprised by the success of it so far, so it’s taught me that maybe I’m not the best at predicting. Nobody was really good at predicting this one. I guess I assumed this [the Kickstarter] would be a good test. I couldn’t take the money and make Psychonauts with it because some people have backed the project based on a certain promise that it’s going to be an adventure game, so it wouldn’t be right to take it and make Psychonauts with it. Maybe we could put it up to a vote! But I actually want to make an old graphic adventure, so we keep it this way and use this as a test to see if we can go bigger.

I think people are asking a lot of publishers and developers out there. At DICE, you can tell people are asking these interview questions, “Well, has this changed everything? Are you going to do Kickstarters to fund all your development now?” I think it really has to be a special thing. I think it’s definitely a possibility to do it a lot more, but I think each time you do it, it has to be a good story for people to get behind. I think the story of us making a graphic adventure when we couldn’t have done it any other way is a good story. I think there are more stories to be done that way, and there might be one that is equal to $20 million dollars. I don’t know.

GB: I think that’s been interesting--the one pushback I’ve seen is extrapolating too much out of this. Double Fine making an adventure game, and having you make an adventure game is a very specific story to tell, and just saying “I’m gonna make a game” isn’t enough. But it’s, at least, encouraging to other developers that have a story. There are other stories that can be funded through this way.

Schafer: Exactly. It’s a good lesson because even when you’re pitching to a publisher, it’s a good lesson in how having a good story is the most important part of a pitch, whether you’re talking to fans or publishers. Having it make sense, why this developer is making game at this time, is always something you should have clear in your mind before you ask anybody for money. You can’t just go “I feel like making something. Gimme some money.”

Brutal Legend was greeted with a mixed reaction, but almost everyone agreed it was hilarious.

GB: Do you consider this validation for what you’ve been doing your whole life? This is such a different scenario than the way you traditionally sell a game, where you get the money afterwards and hopefully it’s a success, but this is people, upfront, telling you how much they believe in what you’ve done before you’ve even produced anything.

Schafer: That’s been really flattering and touching. It’s been really emotional for the whole team, I think, because we’ve had a roller coaster ride in the last couple of years. Just last month we had a project cancelled, and it was really hard on us, and we were like “Are we going to have to lay people off?” But instead, we decided to keep everyone together, and having that at a time when we’ve been struggling, to have this huge outpouring of love from the community and the fans and other developers...it’s just been something that reminded everyone at the company that what they’re doing is noticed by people and matters to people.

GB: It’s a reflection of the enthusiasm. From my perspective, as someone who has watched Double Fine over the years, Double Fine has always come across as a studio that’s never caught that break. It’s a studio that should be much bigger and a much larger success, and the sales and the size don’t reflect people’s reverence for what comes out from the studio. Unlike buying a game at a GameStop or Amazon, this is a much more direct way for people to show their appreciation for what the studio has done over the years.

Schafer: I think so, it’s had that effect on us. It has been a perplexing question. There’s always been a really passionate community, and a really supportive community of Double Fine fans. Or when I walk around the Game Developers Conference and people come up and talk to me and they’re so appreciative about the games and I appreciate them playing them and there’s seems to be so much love out there. And then, when you release a game and the sales are underwhelming, you kind of wonder “How can there be so much love and so little money?” [laughs]

But I’ve always accepted that as the path we’ve chosen. We always want to make games that were experimental and unusual and risky and creative, and also realize there’s a lot of self-determination--own our IP, control our own business and not be told what to do, and that just makes your life harder. That means you don’t get money thrown at you. If you want to do what other people want you to do in life, it’s a lot easier. If you do what you want to do, it’s a lot harder. We’ve always accepted that.

Then, this Kickstarter thing happened, and people were able to express themselves and make themselves heard in a financial way, which is totally new and crazy. And if you look at the number of backers, it’s just like 40,000, which is the highest number of backers they’ve had on Kickstarter, but 40,000 is not high for the sales of a game, right? If you sold 40,000 copies of a game, that would be considered a flop. For a Kickstarter project, it’s considered the greatest success. Why is that? [sighs]

Full Throttle was my first Tim Schafer game, and it still holds a special place in my heart.

GB: It’s not too different from what we’ve been trying to do over at Giant Bomb. The traditional idea is that you need to dominate in order to be a success, but there has to be a way to be happy with what you’re creating, create something that other people enjoy, and do that without having to take over the world in the process. There has to be a way to make that balance, and we try to do that on the editorial side, but it seems like Kickstarter provides a way to maybe do that on the creative side.

Schafer: Yeah, I agree.

GB: I know you’re going to have the discussion board, but how influential are people going to be in the development process, and have you thought about the consequences of inviting 40,000 people to be involved in that process?

Schafer: [laughs] Well, I feel like it’s more about the openness. We’re opening the doors and letting them see the whole process and see the art and hearing what people feel about everything--even 40,000 people--that will be our job for a while. [knock at the door] Do you need to use the bathroom?

Greg Rice: Are you just sitting there?

Schafer: [sigh]

Rice: Wrap it up--I’m sorry!

Schafer: I’m going to go stand in the shower now.

Listening to what they [backers] feel about it is not that different from what I do all the time at Double Fine. Double Fine is a very collaborative office, and everybody feels entitled to and is asked to contribute their ideas to the game. But at the end of the day, I’m responsible for my game and project leaders are responsible for their games and we have to make calls about whether we agree with all that feedback or not. We’re still on the hook for making a great game, so we have to listen to the feedback and filter it and make a great game out of it.

GB: Alright, Tim, I’ll let you go and let someone use the bathroom. I appreciate you taking a couple of minutes. Congratulations--it’s been really fun to watch.

Schafer: Thanks a lot.

Patrick Klepek on Google+
281 Comments
Posted by umdesch4

@CanItRunBF3: If you pledge $15, you're basically pre-ordering a game that hasn't been made yet, and getting some exclusive access to the development process for your trouble.

Posted by HaroldoNVU

@jasondesante said:

It would be cool to see a whole new adventure game, but I really want Full Throttle 2 more than ANYTHING else! :D Full Throttle was the first game I ever finished in my life, at 3 years old on my Mac pro! :D

They should have released all their Amnesia Fortnite games on Steam first, I think the financial story would have been a litle different.

My backer vote goes to the project being Full Throttle 2 :D

I don't think it was their call, I'm assuming it was THQ's since they decided to self publish Costume Quest on Steam. Also, I'm not sure but I think LucasArts owns the Full Throttle IP. Telltale Games could pull it off as they seem to have a good relationship with LA and even did the newest Monkey Island game, but I don't know how they'd feel about letting DoubleFine make a new Full Throttle, that is, assuming LA owns it.

Posted by KestrelPi

First of all, LucasArts has all the rights for the franchises and always will. It's company policy not to sell them. Second of all, this is a unique opportunity to get a brand new adventure game from the mind of Tim Schafer... I don't understand why anyone would want to use that opportunity up on a sequel. I am really excited to see what sort of world Tim Schafer will build for an adventure game in 2011!

Posted by R3DT1D3

Hopefully publishers take notice that we don't necessarily want their predictable sequels all the time and will pay someone to make something great ourselves.

Posted by spartanlolz92

@niamahai said:

Those guys are probably shitting themselves on what to do next. People's expectations will be the death of DoubleFine.

thats so much pressure i mean imagine the people who are paying for your game are all the fans? it would be really hard to gauge criticism from them. i hope this turns out well

Posted by Mezmero

Free money sucks unless it's being given to me. Just kidding. I'm glad to see things looking up for Double Fine as they have made some of the best comedic games of all time. Schafer feels good now but the pressure is on for him to make something amazing. A new adventure game sounds great. Offer him more whiskey to get the hottest scoops on whatever the hell they end up making.

Posted by mnzy
@spartanlolz92 said:

@niamahai said:

Those guys are probably shitting themselves on what to do next. People's expectations will be the death of DoubleFine.

thats so much pressure i mean imagine the people who are paying for your game are all the fans? it would be really hard to gauge criticism from them. i hope this turns out well

I'm a backer and I just want them to do what they want, really. I think most people do.
Posted by TruthTellah

Thanks so much for this interview; this was great. If only we could hear from more developers so casually like this.

I look forward to seeing what Double Fine will be do with my money. :)

Posted by DrDarkStryfe

It is always great to hear what Tim has to say, he is one of the best personalities in gaming.

Posted by Fuga

How much do they actually get after all the fees and taxes?

I heard something like 60%.

Posted by umdesch4

@mnzy said:

@spartanlolz92 said:

@niamahai said:

Those guys are probably shitting themselves on what to do next. People's expectations will be the death of DoubleFine.

thats so much pressure i mean imagine the people who are paying for your game are all the fans? it would be really hard to gauge criticism from them. i hope this turns out well

I'm a backer and I just want them to do what they want, really. I think most people do.

My comment on the kickstarter page said:

I'm totally fine if our influence amounts to the occasional vote in a poll that's on whatever community site they set up. I donated 'cuz I have faith that they'll make something great, and while I appreciate the potential to be involved, I wouldn't trust myself to ever second guess what they're gonna do!

Posted by TuftyMcTavish

This is such a great story. I'm utterly fascinated by it. The accidental timing of it and having it distrupt GDC is just brilliant. Thanks, Patrick, you were asking just the sort of things I want to know. Your commentary about similarities with GiantBomb is spot on in my mind - I like what you do and am more than willing to contribute my yearly subs towards it.

Posted by algertman

@superscatman said:

@HelixNebula said:

Not everyone seems to like this.

http://www.pixelperfectmag.com/2012/02/sunday-edition-kickstarter-double-fine.html

He does bring up some valid points.

This guy seems to have a uninformed opinion on Double Fine's financial situation. Tim even said in this interview that they were worried that they were going to have to downsize .The person who wrote the article thinks that because he played the games or has at least heard of them it means they have to have been a financial success.

Also, the idea of giving the extra money to charity is really dumb. It was given to them to make a game, if the people wanted to give to a charity they would have in the first place.

The guy who wrote the article seems awfully upset that people who are fans of a company are giving a company money to make a game that they want.

Down with video game bail outs. RON PAUL!!

Posted by Batmeng

What I would give for another Grim Fandango game.

Screw you LucasArts.

Posted by mnzy
@Fuga said:

How much do they actually get after all the fees and taxes?

I heard something like 60%.

Yes, I heard that recently, too. Taxes are insane on it, because it counts as a gift, not an investment.
Edited by jasondesante

imagine if Steam let you convert keys into money then you could donate tf2 items to a kickstarter like thing on steam. then people would stop selling tf2 items using paypal and can just use steam wallet, and people can even fund video games with their scrap metal...how crazy would that be? holy crap the future is promising

I think it would be awesome to let people donate money or even time if they don't have any money, but then the scrap metal could be converted to money at a high enough level. That would be amazing.

Basically if Double Fine sold keys and Refined metal for paypal money like some traders do, I would gladly donate some metal. I know others will too. With enough metal they would have a lot of stock to sell which would result in more money for their fund. Digital items could totally act as additional currency if implemented in the right system like Steam is currently working towards.

Posted by OverlyEquipped

@algertman: Brutal Legend was more so advertised poorly to say the least. Especially when you don't even expect the other core-part of the game..

Posted by milkman4591

maybe one day, advent rising 2 will be put on kickstarter...

Posted by doublezeroduck

Adventure games aren't for me but if it was for Psyconauts 2 I would chip in a couple hundred or so. Make it happen Double Fine!

Posted by Tim_the_Corsair
@AhmadMetallic
Three articles about Double Fine in less than a week.. this is getting unprofessional. Sure, we love Schafer and the guys are friends with you GB staff but you're spamming about them at this point, Patrick.  
 
Edit: Eh, I'm enjoying reading this, why was the observant comment obligatory? I dunno, it just is.
Maybe because this whole situation is kind of a big deal with far-reaching consequences for the entire industry?

Nah, you're right they should just set an arbitrary limit on how many articles they run so they aren't spamming about Double Fine.
Posted by AhmadMetallic
@Tim_the_Corsair said:
@AhmadMetallic
Three articles about Double Fine in less than a week.. this is getting unprofessional. Sure, we love Schafer and the guys are friends with you GB staff but you're spamming about them at this point, Patrick.  
 
Edit: Eh, I'm enjoying reading this, why was the observant comment obligatory? I dunno, it just is.
Maybe because this whole situation is kind of a big deal with far-reaching consequences for the entire industry? Nah, you're right they should just set an arbitrary limit on how many articles they run so they aren't spamming about Double Fine.
You get me, I like that.
Posted by Nomin

Hmm.. as good an anti-piracy measure as the industry, along with some friendly media liaisons, will ever come up with. Still a roulette of sorts though, NEG offered a similar pledge but conditional to some unrealistic goals and wasn`t able to achieve much.

Posted by Lazyaza

"Oh, I just told you all my secrets! [laughs]" - heh made me laugh too. I hope this game turns out amazing, heck even if it doesn't it's a special event people should be part of in some capacity when its done. The first modestly budgeted fan-funded game and one that is part of a supposed "dead" genre too. It's all so awesome.

Posted by subyman

I threw down 30 bucks just for the hell of it.

Posted by chrisplyons@gmail.com

When this whole thing kicked off I was so excited just to give my money to Tim. It made me stop and think about how I have to support the ones that really matter. So for the first time for the years of service I finally gave GB the money they deserved. Sorry it took so long guys. Happy to put something in your pocket now.

Posted by Fealiks

@Klei: Monkey Island already got that treatment from Telltale

Posted by CodeFire

What a great interview this was. :D

"Are you just sitting there?"

Posted by Meowayne

Some of you wish for this money to be poured into a sequel. That baffles me. There is this very rare occurance indeed where an established house is able, willing and aptly funded to create a digital game outside of the influence of a publisher, and here we have a significant amount of people who would not want this to be an original game? What?

Posted by TinyGallon

How great was Full Throttle

Edited by dodgyc

You know, I don't even care that this is a point and click game. I pledged because I would like them to deliver something with a story core as strong as Grim Fandango and Monkey Island. I'll forgive a lot of flaws if that isn't compromised. For me, story mechanics stay in my mind far longer than things like gameplay mechanics (e.g. GF's strange camera oriented 3d sontrol scheme).

Posted by AxleBro

@AhmadMetallic said:

Three articles about Double Fine in less than a week.. this is getting unprofessional. Sure, we love Schafer and the guys are friends with you GB staff but you're spamming about them at this point, Patrick. Edit: Eh, I'm enjoying reading this, why was the observant comment obligatory? I dunno, it just is.

don't read them then, some of us like Double Fine.

Posted by EnduranceFun

Great interview Patrick, wanted some coverage of this amazing... thing that happened.

Though it does get a bit self-indulgent when you mention Giant Bomb, and that is reflected by Schafer's answer there. Still, keep up the good work.

Posted by danielcampbell

First off, I think this is really great. I love Tim and wish him all the success he is due.

That being said, I'm curious how some of the smaller indie devs feel about this. Kickstarter seems to be geared towards smaller teams that have nowhere else to go for funding. For someone who already makes multi-millions dollar games to come in and take money from kickstarter may...disappoint some indies. It's kind of like someone who makes millions of dollars a year having medicaid.

Again, I think this is awesome and love Tim with all my geek heart.

Posted by KestrelPi

@danielcampbell said:

First off, I think this is really great. I love Tim and wish him all the success he is due.

That being said, I'm curious how some of the smaller indie devs feel about this. Kickstarter seems to be geared towards smaller teams that have nowhere else to go for funding. For someone who already makes multi-millions dollar games to come in and take money from kickstarter may...disappoint some indies. It's kind of like someone who makes millions of dollars a year having medicaid.

Again, I think this is awesome and love Tim with all my geek heart.

We are nearly all supportive of it amongst the London indie devs I know. First of all, Tim has always fought to make the games he really wants to make, and there's nothing more indie than that. Secondly, quite a few projects have reported an increase in funding since the Double Fine Project began, just from the increase in people buzzing around Kickstarter. Lastly, we're not really a jealous bunch, on the whole, and we like to celebrate success when we see it.

Posted by Claude

They should make a point and click adventure that's Kinect enabled. You point and say click.

Posted by wafflez

I'm really glad that the double fine love extends beyond Giant Bomb.  These are some of the best dudes making games right now and it would have been horrible if they didn't hit their goal.  I donated 100$ first time I heard about this because I knew it was money well spent. 

Posted by Xeirus

@AxleFGK said:

@AhmadMetallic said:

Three articles about Double Fine in less than a week.. this is getting unprofessional. Sure, we love Schafer and the guys are friends with you GB staff but you're spamming about them at this point, Patrick. Edit: Eh, I'm enjoying reading this, why was the observant comment obligatory? I dunno, it just is.

don't read them then, some of us like Double Fine.

Stupidity is the worst...

Posted by danielcampbell

@SurplusGamer: Good to hear! I was just curious if there were any indies out there who might me upset a little and are afraid to complain due to possible severe backlash.

Posted by DrStrangepork

It warms my heart to see the gaming community get behind something like this for Double Fine. I have to say I am a fan of Tim Schafer and Double Fine games and I think an adventure game, if done correctly, could be a lot of fun. Or maybe Tim Schafer is just using this money to fund his death ray.

Either way, I'm cool with it.

Posted by Hailinel

@AhmadMetallic said:

Three articles about Double Fine in less than a week.. this is getting unprofessional. Sure, we love Schafer and the guys are friends with you GB staff but you're spamming about them at this point, Patrick. Edit: Eh, I'm enjoying reading this, why was the observant comment obligatory? I dunno, it just is.

It's unprofessional to post follow-up stories and related interviews?

Do you understand how reporting the news works?

Posted by enoteware

Great quote from Tim "If you want to do what other people want you to do in life, it’s a lot easier. If you do what you want to do, it’s a lot harder. We’ve always accepted that."

Posted by BitterAlmond

This has motivated me to finally get around to spending some time and making Grim Fandango work on my computer. Fingers crossed.

Posted by EmuLeader

@Pop said:

Tim said that a game selling 40.000 copies is a flop, but all those 40.000 ppl didn't donate just 15$ some donated 100 1000 etc. so some ppl bought the game 100 times xD, also this thing is crazy and doesn't kickstarter take a part of this?

he said the average for the amount raised based on the amount of people who have donated is $35 per person, which is still less than a retail game.

Posted by Brendan

@Xeirus said:

@AxleFGK said:

@AhmadMetallic said:

Three articles about Double Fine in less than a week.. this is getting unprofessional. Sure, we love Schafer and the guys are friends with you GB staff but you're spamming about them at this point, Patrick. Edit: Eh, I'm enjoying reading this, why was the observant comment obligatory? I dunno, it just is.

don't read them then, some of us like Double Fine.

Stupidity is the worst...

Giantbomb is a small website, with less access to developers for stories like this.

1. This story is in its zeitgeist period right now, so it makes sense to cover it when its getting a lot of attention.

2. Because Giantbomb is small, and only has a few key relationships, it has to use that comparitive advantage and maximize those relationships. Giantbomb would like to be able to do this sort of thing with every developer if they could, but they can only manage to pull it off (at the moment) with Double Fine, with Greg Kasavin, with Johnny V, and a few others. They are going to get in depth coverage that others aren't when they can, and they can only do that with a limited amount of people. If you can't recognize this reality then its not Giantbomb's problem, its yours.

Posted by dragonaut

I have never played a Tim Schafer gaem

Posted by tyemry

@Brendan said:

@Xeirus said:

@AxleFGK said:

@AhmadMetallic said:

Three articles about Double Fine in less than a week.. this is getting unprofessional. Sure, we love Schafer and the guys are friends with you GB staff but you're spamming about them at this point, Patrick. Edit: Eh, I'm enjoying reading this, why was the observant comment obligatory? I dunno, it just is.

don't read them then, some of us like Double Fine.

Stupidity is the worst...

Giantbomb is a small website, with less access to developers for stories like this.

1. This story is in its zeitgeist period right now, so it makes sense to cover it when its getting a lot of attention.

2. Because Giantbomb is small, and only has a few key relationships, it has to use that comparitive advantage and maximize those relationships. Giantbomb would like to be able to do this sort of thing with every developer if they could, but they can only manage to pull it off (at the moment) with Double Fine, with Greg Kasavin, with Johnny V, and a few others. They are going to get in depth coverage that others aren't when they can, and they can only do that with a limited amount of people. If you can't recognize this reality then its not Giantbomb's problem, its yours.

I agree with you, and I think also that the big story here is not that Double Fine or Tim Schafer are getting that kind of attention, but in the fact that the way the sausage is made games-wise is changing so radically. Given, this is an extremely special case, but I think it illustrates that while a Call of Duty game can sell a jillion copies and (probably) always will, there is an interesting democratization of game production happening at the enthusiast level. The rapid growth of the games industry creates new opportunities for those who aren't Epic or Bungie to make a living while still providing a more specific audience with the products that they want. I will say that these stories have been extremely interesting to me, regardless of the fact that the last game I played that involved anyone at Double Fine was "Full Throttle" back in 19xx, because of the idea that now, maybe, all we have to do is fund and support the games and developers we like to get the products that we want.

Posted by Brendan

I should add that the people here putting this situation as "Patrick is doing a bunch of Patrick stories" are simply wrong. There has been one news item with updates, and an interview. An interview and a news story are not the same thing. Websites everywhere do a news story and an interview in the span of a week.

Posted by BMUZYN

@algertman: I agree with you, I played it for a few hours and had to put into my graveyard...

Posted by selbie

I almost feel like my $35 wasn't enough now :P

Posted by cavemantom

@TinyGallon said:

How great was Full Throttle

Totally great.

It's a crying shame that LucasFilm are too busy squandering the rights to Maniac Mansion/DOTT and Full Throttle to make a continuation of either of those possible.