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Dave Lang's Top 10 Games of 2012

Enter the Lang Zone!

Dave Lang is a game industry veteran with more than 15 years of experience. His past credits include Space Jam, WCW Backstage Assault, Inside Pitch 2003, and Blitz: The League. He is the founder and CEO of Chicago-based game developer Iron Galaxy Studios, whose most recent release was the 2012 Summer of Arcade Kinect title, Wreckateer.

Publicly commenting on another developer’s game is always a dicey proposition. If you’ve made games long enough you know how crummy it is when someone takes a dump on something you’ve poured yourself into, and the last thing you’d want to do is foist that feeling onto another dev. You know this, because if you’ve been doing this long enough you’ve probably shipped a handful of Grade-A Stinkers, and you know that despite being good at your job, and being surrounded by awesome people, sometimes you are put into unwinnable situations and you just do the best you can. This is the main reason I try not to comment on other people’s games in public forums.

But Top 10 lists are a different beast. They are a celebration of the seemingly-mythical times when everything goes right and games turn out Great. About the only thing another dev could say to me after reading this list is “Hey, Dave, why didn’t you put my/our game on your list?” And my answer to that question will always be the same: “Because, friend. Your game finished 11.”

10. Sine Mora

If you’re remotely into old-timey shooters like R-Type you should give Sine Mora a trial run, as it’s got a lot of things going for it. Unlike a lot of contemporary bullet-hell shooters it’s not a one-hit-and-done proposition. When you take damage in Sine Mora the game simply removes how much time you have to hit your next checkpoint. It changes the strategy a bit, as in Sine Mora sometimes the best decision is to steer directly into enemy fire if it gives you a more direct path to pick up a power up. This isn’t a huge deal, but I liked that I could die by 1000 cuts versus playing perfect for 20 minutes and lose it all instantly in a brain fart. Visually the game is gorgeous. The bosses are lavishly created, sometimes spanning multiple screens in size. And the story? I think it’s safe to say it won’t be for everybody, but I completely admire the developer’s dedication to their vision, because I guarantee they had more than a few arguments with some people along the way about some of the bat-shit insane stuff that happens.

9. Sleeping Dogs

When you play Sleeping Dogs it’s easy to forget all the baggage it carries around with it. Having started with Activision as a True Crime game, only to get dropped a few years later before being revived by Square Enix as Sleeping Dogs, it’s easy to see why so many outside observers had their doubts about this game. Why would Activision drop it if it were awesome, after all? I was fortunate enough to have a different view, as I very briefly (about two weeks total) worked on this game months before Activision threw it into limbo. I got to work out of the UFG offices and see what they were making, and I was floored with everything they had accomplished. They managed to build a competitive open-world engine, seemingly overnight. Within that engine they had correctly picked a few areas where they could do something different in the open-world crime genre (novel setting, melee-heavy combat), and they managed to tell a great story along the way. It would have been very unfortunate if this game never made it out, and I’m happy for all the people at UFG that it did. This game is awesome and you should play it.

8. Dishonored

I once heard someone describe Dishonored as Steam-Punk Splinter Cell and I think that’s pretty dead-on. There’s a mix of stealth, gadgets, and combat at work here that felt completely familiar, but because I had never played super-spy in such a unique and well-realized world the entire thing felt completely new. For my money, the most important character in Dishonored is the world in which the game takes place. It’s pretty, visually consistent, and built with a gameplay-first purpose that I imagine was hard to do properly while still feeling credible. The game’s rhythm took a while to click with me; I wanted to reload my last save after I was detected instead of dealing with the repercussions as they came, but once I got over that mental block I fell in love with the game. It’s the only game in recent memory I replayed some levels after I had finished the story, just to try some different styles out. Just typing this blurb makes me want to play through the brothel level again, and I think that’s about as high a compliment as I can pay to Dishonored.

7. FTL: Faster Than Light

I spent the better part of this year convinced that the balance in FTL was completely broken. Mostly because at the end of the day no amount of skillful play could overcome not getting the right sequence of “good things” before the final boss shenanigans ensued. Didn’t get enough crew members by Zone 3? Restart. Get screwed by vendor placement in Zone 4? Restart. Accidentally vent the Oxygen from the cabin your weapons guy was in? You guessed it, restart.

Well, if it’s so broken, then why the fuck did I keep restarting? Why did I keep going back again and again, for the better part of two months? It was only very recently that I figured this out. The game isn’t balanced to be fair; it’s balanced to make you think you are always a hair’s breadth from success. In that regard it’s balanced perfectly.

6. Mass Effect 3

Mixed pride and shame. I only recently played through Mass Effect 3, and because of this I had the benefit of playing with all three DLCs and the Extended Cut. Apologetically. Now I realize there are some people who didn’t get this luxury and are dissatisfied with the ending, and for those people this disappointment has irrevocably tainted the game itself. Consolingly. I can’t judge the game on anyone’s experience but my own, and I walked away from the game satisfied with the conclusion I experienced. Upbeat. Above and beyond that the game is flat-out fun. Shepard’s final romp through the galaxy if filled with exciting encounters, interesting story beats, and dare I say more than enough cathartic moments to justify the time I put into it. Matter-of-fact-ly. If the immense and negative public reaction to the game’s conclusion put you off initially and you steered clear, it’s time to dive back in and finish what you started. Just make sure you get all the DLC and the extended cut, trust me it’s worth it.

5. Halo 4

For openers let me get this out of the way: I love all things Halo. It’s probably my favorite series of all time, and it’s one of the few AAA franchises left that gets my heart aflutter when a new game is announced. When Microsoft opened their E3 Press Conference with 10 minutes of Halo 4, and I got to first see where 343 had taken the series, any doubts I had about them doing the game justice began to recede. This was immediately recognizable as Halo, in all the best and most predictable ways. It’s because of this that I tend to disagree with the most common complaint I’ve read in reviews: that 343 played it too safe, that it’s too familiar an experience. Yes, I spent a lot of time shooting Covenant troops in the game, waging those familiar battles over and over. Yes, mechanically there’s no re-invention of what it’s like to play as Master Chief. And yes, the story is vague in the worst Lost-like way possible, but none of that mattered to me. When I played Halo 4 I was instantly brought back to the first time I stormed the beach on Stellar Cartographer. They built a Halo-ass Halo game, which is more than enough for me.

4. XCOM: Enemy Unknown

I don’t know what’s more remarkable, the quality of the game itself or the fact that it was made at all. As far as I can tell prior to Enemy Unknown coming out there was zero evidence to support the notion that you could make a big-budget, AAA, tactics game and have it end well, either creatively or financially. I don’t have any knowledge of its development cycle, but from reading bits here and there it sounds like Enemy Unknown had been in development for anywhere from three to five years. Knowing that I’d put the over/under on number of meetings where people at 2K discussed cancelling it at three. Through all this somehow it survived, and I couldn’t be happier it did. The creators understood the most important thing about all the XCOM games is the player’s relationship with their squad, and shaved off everything that didn’t reinforce that notion. What remains is an amazingly streamlined strategy game that never insults its audience through its simplicity. I pretty sure I’ll be playing this game for years to come.

3. Max Payne 3

Here’s the shortest possible summary of what I love about Max Payne: Rockstar’s unimitatible style and character development is finally paired up with legitimate shooting mechanics; if your tastes remotely align with mine you should be a very big fan of Max Payne 3. There’re so many little moments that have that “Rockstar” feel. The slow-motion set piece shooting sequences. The TV-distortion style visual effects slathered on the cutscenes. There’s Nova Esperanca, walking through the city with music blasting in the background. Add up all these little moments and the game is greater than the sum of its parts.

In addition to that, somehow the developers made me care about Max Payne (the character) who, putting it charitably, is an irredeemable piece of shit. The game itself probably overstays it’s welcome a bit, I only powered through the last hour to see how it all would end, but if you passed on this game for whatever reason, consider giving it another shot, I doubt you’ll regret it.

2. Journey

Generally speaking, in the discussion of “games as art” I tend to fall into the “who cares” category. What’s art to me might not be art to you, and that’s fine (I’d argue that’s the point but that’s a different topic altogether). I only bring this up because it seems impossible to discuss thatgamecompany’s body of work without diving neck-deep into the topic. I didn’t like flOw, I thought Flower was good but only played through it once. Apart from being very different in a world where different (on consoles, anyway) doesn’t exist, their games didn’t leave any long-lasting impressions with me. Couple that with the fact that I don’t really care about “games as art,” and I didn’t have huge expectations for Journey. If what you’ve just read aligns with your own feelings on thatgamecompany and/or their games, and you haven’t played Journey, I’m here to recalibrate your expectations.

I don’t want to start cataloging the mechanics/environments/characters that makes Journey awesome, because experiencing the moment-to-moment stuff in the game is central to its fun, but there are a few things that deserve special praise. The bite-sized adventure the game takes you on is equal parts exhilarating and thoughtful, and the ending…let’s just say it’s better experienced than discussed. Journey also has the best co-op implementation ever on a console. It’s a point that has already been talked to death, but if you would have told me I’d have a good co-op experience with a person named BongRipper420 I’d have chuckled to myself and rolled my eyes. In a world where it’s easy for developers to just shrug their shoulders and say “It’s the Internet, we can’t stop them” when confronted with the typical poor behavior of players in an online setting, thatgamecompany showed everyone how it’s done. If you make games for a living and haven’t played Journey you’re not doing your job; it’s transcendent.

1. The Walking Dead

It’s more or less impossible for me to write about why I love this game so much without spoiling a bunch of stuff. When I’m talking with friends about the game our conversations devolve into “What happened for you at Thing X?” or “HOLY SHIT can you believe the balls on Guy Y, what did you do about that?” That’s the magic of the Walking Dead. It’s a water-cooler-moment generator like nothing I’ve played since GTA 3, and that’s what makes it special.

Does it have some faults? Sure. It’s mechanically sparse, and while they do tie up the main arc in a very satisfying way they needed to make some illogical leaps to get there…but I couldn’t care less. Telltale delivered on the promise of making me feel the pain, bravery, and sacrifice of living in a zombie apocalypse without making me play the role of some steroid-fueled, gun-toting action movie hero, and in video games that’s impossible, right?

47 Comments
Posted by Ryan

Dave Lang is a game industry veteran with more than 15 years of experience. His past credits include Space Jam, WCW Backstage Assault, Inside Pitch 2003, and Blitz: The League. He is the founder and CEO of Chicago-based game developer Iron Galaxy Studios, whose most recent release was the 2012 Summer of Arcade Kinect title, Wreckateer.

Publicly commenting on another developer’s game is always a dicey proposition. If you’ve made games long enough you know how crummy it is when someone takes a dump on something you’ve poured yourself into, and the last thing you’d want to do is foist that feeling onto another dev. You know this, because if you’ve been doing this long enough you’ve probably shipped a handful of Grade-A Stinkers, and you know that despite being good at your job, and being surrounded by awesome people, sometimes you are put into unwinnable situations and you just do the best you can. This is the main reason I try not to comment on other people’s games in public forums.

But Top 10 lists are a different beast. They are a celebration of the seemingly-mythical times when everything goes right and games turn out Great. About the only thing another dev could say to me after reading this list is “Hey, Dave, why didn’t you put my/our game on your list?” And my answer to that question will always be the same: “Because, friend. Your game finished 11.”

10. Sine Mora

If you’re remotely into old-timey shooters like R-Type you should give Sine Mora a trial run, as it’s got a lot of things going for it. Unlike a lot of contemporary bullet-hell shooters it’s not a one-hit-and-done proposition. When you take damage in Sine Mora the game simply removes how much time you have to hit your next checkpoint. It changes the strategy a bit, as in Sine Mora sometimes the best decision is to steer directly into enemy fire if it gives you a more direct path to pick up a power up. This isn’t a huge deal, but I liked that I could die by 1000 cuts versus playing perfect for 20 minutes and lose it all instantly in a brain fart. Visually the game is gorgeous. The bosses are lavishly created, sometimes spanning multiple screens in size. And the story? I think it’s safe to say it won’t be for everybody, but I completely admire the developer’s dedication to their vision, because I guarantee they had more than a few arguments with some people along the way about some of the bat-shit insane stuff that happens.

9. Sleeping Dogs

When you play Sleeping Dogs it’s easy to forget all the baggage it carries around with it. Having started with Activision as a True Crime game, only to get dropped a few years later before being revived by Square Enix as Sleeping Dogs, it’s easy to see why so many outside observers had their doubts about this game. Why would Activision drop it if it were awesome, after all? I was fortunate enough to have a different view, as I very briefly (about two weeks total) worked on this game months before Activision threw it into limbo. I got to work out of the UFG offices and see what they were making, and I was floored with everything they had accomplished. They managed to build a competitive open-world engine, seemingly overnight. Within that engine they had correctly picked a few areas where they could do something different in the open-world crime genre (novel setting, melee-heavy combat), and they managed to tell a great story along the way. It would have been very unfortunate if this game never made it out, and I’m happy for all the people at UFG that it did. This game is awesome and you should play it.

8. Dishonored

I once heard someone describe Dishonored as Steam-Punk Splinter Cell and I think that’s pretty dead-on. There’s a mix of stealth, gadgets, and combat at work here that felt completely familiar, but because I had never played super-spy in such a unique and well-realized world the entire thing felt completely new. For my money, the most important character in Dishonored is the world in which the game takes place. It’s pretty, visually consistent, and built with a gameplay-first purpose that I imagine was hard to do properly while still feeling credible. The game’s rhythm took a while to click with me; I wanted to reload my last save after I was detected instead of dealing with the repercussions as they came, but once I got over that mental block I fell in love with the game. It’s the only game in recent memory I replayed some levels after I had finished the story, just to try some different styles out. Just typing this blurb makes me want to play through the brothel level again, and I think that’s about as high a compliment as I can pay to Dishonored.

7. FTL: Faster Than Light

I spent the better part of this year convinced that the balance in FTL was completely broken. Mostly because at the end of the day no amount of skillful play could overcome not getting the right sequence of “good things” before the final boss shenanigans ensued. Didn’t get enough crew members by Zone 3? Restart. Get screwed by vendor placement in Zone 4? Restart. Accidentally vent the Oxygen from the cabin your weapons guy was in? You guessed it, restart.

Well, if it’s so broken, then why the fuck did I keep restarting? Why did I keep going back again and again, for the better part of two months? It was only very recently that I figured this out. The game isn’t balanced to be fair; it’s balanced to make you think you are always a hair’s breadth from success. In that regard it’s balanced perfectly.

6. Mass Effect 3

Mixed pride and shame. I only recently played through Mass Effect 3, and because of this I had the benefit of playing with all three DLCs and the Extended Cut. Apologetically. Now I realize there are some people who didn’t get this luxury and are dissatisfied with the ending, and for those people this disappointment has irrevocably tainted the game itself. Consolingly. I can’t judge the game on anyone’s experience but my own, and I walked away from the game satisfied with the conclusion I experienced. Upbeat. Above and beyond that the game is flat-out fun. Shepard’s final romp through the galaxy if filled with exciting encounters, interesting story beats, and dare I say more than enough cathartic moments to justify the time I put into it. Matter-of-fact-ly. If the immense and negative public reaction to the game’s conclusion put you off initially and you steered clear, it’s time to dive back in and finish what you started. Just make sure you get all the DLC and the extended cut, trust me it’s worth it.

5. Halo 4

For openers let me get this out of the way: I love all things Halo. It’s probably my favorite series of all time, and it’s one of the few AAA franchises left that gets my heart aflutter when a new game is announced. When Microsoft opened their E3 Press Conference with 10 minutes of Halo 4, and I got to first see where 343 had taken the series, any doubts I had about them doing the game justice began to recede. This was immediately recognizable as Halo, in all the best and most predictable ways. It’s because of this that I tend to disagree with the most common complaint I’ve read in reviews: that 343 played it too safe, that it’s too familiar an experience. Yes, I spent a lot of time shooting Covenant troops in the game, waging those familiar battles over and over. Yes, mechanically there’s no re-invention of what it’s like to play as Master Chief. And yes, the story is vague in the worst Lost-like way possible, but none of that mattered to me. When I played Halo 4 I was instantly brought back to the first time I stormed the beach on Stellar Cartographer. They built a Halo-ass Halo game, which is more than enough for me.

4. XCOM: Enemy Unknown

I don’t know what’s more remarkable, the quality of the game itself or the fact that it was made at all. As far as I can tell prior to Enemy Unknown coming out there was zero evidence to support the notion that you could make a big-budget, AAA, tactics game and have it end well, either creatively or financially. I don’t have any knowledge of its development cycle, but from reading bits here and there it sounds like Enemy Unknown had been in development for anywhere from three to five years. Knowing that I’d put the over/under on number of meetings where people at 2K discussed cancelling it at three. Through all this somehow it survived, and I couldn’t be happier it did. The creators understood the most important thing about all the XCOM games is the player’s relationship with their squad, and shaved off everything that didn’t reinforce that notion. What remains is an amazingly streamlined strategy game that never insults its audience through its simplicity. I pretty sure I’ll be playing this game for years to come.

3. Max Payne 3

Here’s the shortest possible summary of what I love about Max Payne: Rockstar’s unimitatible style and character development is finally paired up with legitimate shooting mechanics; if your tastes remotely align with mine you should be a very big fan of Max Payne 3. There’re so many little moments that have that “Rockstar” feel. The slow-motion set piece shooting sequences. The TV-distortion style visual effects slathered on the cutscenes. There’s Nova Esperanca, walking through the city with music blasting in the background. Add up all these little moments and the game is greater than the sum of its parts.

In addition to that, somehow the developers made me care about Max Payne (the character) who, putting it charitably, is an irredeemable piece of shit. The game itself probably overstays it’s welcome a bit, I only powered through the last hour to see how it all would end, but if you passed on this game for whatever reason, consider giving it another shot, I doubt you’ll regret it.

2. Journey

Generally speaking, in the discussion of “games as art” I tend to fall into the “who cares” category. What’s art to me might not be art to you, and that’s fine (I’d argue that’s the point but that’s a different topic altogether). I only bring this up because it seems impossible to discuss thatgamecompany’s body of work without diving neck-deep into the topic. I didn’t like flOw, I thought Flower was good but only played through it once. Apart from being very different in a world where different (on consoles, anyway) doesn’t exist, their games didn’t leave any long-lasting impressions with me. Couple that with the fact that I don’t really care about “games as art,” and I didn’t have huge expectations for Journey. If what you’ve just read aligns with your own feelings on thatgamecompany and/or their games, and you haven’t played Journey, I’m here to recalibrate your expectations.

I don’t want to start cataloging the mechanics/environments/characters that makes Journey awesome, because experiencing the moment-to-moment stuff in the game is central to its fun, but there are a few things that deserve special praise. The bite-sized adventure the game takes you on is equal parts exhilarating and thoughtful, and the ending…let’s just say it’s better experienced than discussed. Journey also has the best co-op implementation ever on a console. It’s a point that has already been talked to death, but if you would have told me I’d have a good co-op experience with a person named BongRipper420 I’d have chuckled to myself and rolled my eyes. In a world where it’s easy for developers to just shrug their shoulders and say “It’s the Internet, we can’t stop them” when confronted with the typical poor behavior of players in an online setting, thatgamecompany showed everyone how it’s done. If you make games for a living and haven’t played Journey you’re not doing your job; it’s transcendent.

1. The Walking Dead

It’s more or less impossible for me to write about why I love this game so much without spoiling a bunch of stuff. When I’m talking with friends about the game our conversations devolve into “What happened for you at Thing X?” or “HOLY SHIT can you believe the balls on Guy Y, what did you do about that?” That’s the magic of the Walking Dead. It’s a water-cooler-moment generator like nothing I’ve played since GTA 3, and that’s what makes it special.

Does it have some faults? Sure. It’s mechanically sparse, and while they do tie up the main arc in a very satisfying way they needed to make some illogical leaps to get there…but I couldn’t care less. Telltale delivered on the promise of making me feel the pain, bravery, and sacrifice of living in a zombie apocalypse without making me play the role of some steroid-fueled, gun-toting action movie hero, and in video games that’s impossible, right?

Staff
Edited by Marconi88

Nice list Dave.

Posted by travellinman

LANG ZONE!

Posted by DarkFury

Pretty close to my own list here!

Posted by Cheesebob

I just entered the lang zone unprotected

Posted by HisHeroIsGone

Nice to see Max Payne 3 in the top-3. The gunplay in that is amazing.

Posted by MrMazz

I did not know DAVE LANG worked on Space Jam, I loved that game.

Edited by PimblyCharles

@Cheesebob said:

I just entered the lang zone unprotected

Expect a rash and strange bumps. There is no cure for the lang zone...

Posted by RandomInternetUser

Yay, some Max Payne 3 love.

Posted by crusader8463

How dare you put X-Com so low on your list! You monster! Why do you hate fun/firaxis/ethnic minorities/children/candy/love so much?

Edited by DharmaBum

Fuck yeah, someone recognizing Max Payne 3 for its sheer style.

Also, the Stellar Cartographer :P

Posted by WMWA

Enthusiastically. Great list, Dave Lang

Posted by Ghostiet

@HisHeroIsGone said:

Nice to see Max Payne 3 in the top-3. The gunplay in that is amazing.

This, a thousand times this.

Posted by mrcraggle

I must have had the perfect run on FTL as I managed to beat the game on my 4th try. Admittedly this was on easy but people still said it was rather difficult on that. I just need to go back to it now and try it on normal and see if the same strategy holds up.

Posted by buzz_killington

I love the credits he chose to put on his bio.

Posted by LarryDavis

@Ghostiet said:

@HisHeroIsGone said:

Nice to see Max Payne 3 in the top-3. The gunplay in that is amazing.

This, a thousand times this.

I think GB did it a huge disservice by playing it on consoles instead of waiting for the PC release. Playing it on Hard, with mouse aiming, makes it so much better since it severely limits the regular-ass Bullet Time. You gotta dive around like a psycho idiot headshotting everyone. It's GREAT.

Just too bad about the oddly unskippable cutscenes killing replay value.

Posted by BaconGames

I would feel remiss if I didn't comment on this wonderful man's list. Without him I wouldn't have had the best and most memorable PAX East this year, let alone at the forefront of the Lang Zone. I just wanted to say thanks again Lang and Giant Bomb for helping that happen.

Posted by Hailinel

I guess I don't understand the notion that it's somehow OK that Bioware locked content some would find necessary to enjoy the ending in any way behind a pay wall. It's basically saying "If you didn't enjoy the ending, pay them more and experience it again."

What.

Posted by Roger778

Very impressed to see Max Payne 3 on the list, and to hear that the shooting mechanics are great, too.

Your description of Dishonored as a Steam-punk Splinter Cell type game completely sold me on the game. I can't wait to play it.

Seeing Mass Effect 3 get some more love makes me very happy.

Overall, that was a great top ten list, Mr. Lang.

Posted by Wikitoups

this is my favorite list this year so much good insile!

Posted by Quintessence

I read the Mass Effect 3 section in an elcor voice!

Edited by heatDrive88

Seeing Dave Lang type up his Mass Effect 3 entry as an Elcor makes everything in this world worth it.

Posted by triviaman09

As somebody who never played the first two Max Payne games, I really enjoyed Max Payne 3. Great shooting mechanics, great writing, good (mad dark) story.

Posted by BD_Mr_Bubbles

good list

Posted by beepmachine

Awesome seeing Dave give Journey some love. Didn't think it would be a game he'd go for at all, so it's cool to see it that high. Solid list all around too.

Edited by xMEGADETHxSLY

Dave Langs REAL top 10

  1. Wreckateer
  2. Wreckateer
  3. Wreckateer
  4. Wreckateer
  5. Wreckateer
  6. Wreckateer
  7. Wreckateer
  8. Wreckateer
  9. Wreckateer
  10. Wreckateer
Posted by Brackynews

@PimblyCharles said:

@Cheesebob said:

I just entered the lang zone unprotected

Expect a rash and strange bumps. There is no cure for the lang zone...

Gotta stick the langding.

Posted by zombiesatemycereal

@Hailinel: Nobody has said doing that was okay.

Edited by ArtisanBreads

Big ups to Lang for Max Payne 3!

Disappointing to not see it get any love yet. I thought the story was excellent but even if you just thought all that was okay, mechanically it's the best third person shooter ever made. Criminal it doesn't get more recognition to me. But oh well. It has it's fans and I'm one of them.

My GOTY.

@triviaman09 said:

As somebody who never played the first two Max Payne games, I really enjoyed Max Payne 3. Great shooting mechanics, great writing, good (mad dark) story.

You should check them out. I loved 1 and 2 is my second favorite game ever and I still loved 3. I think it's a misconception you can't like both.

Remedy did their thing and it was brilliant. Rockstar did there thing and it was as well. I'm glad they didn't force the Remedy style if they couldn't pull it off. I'm glad they had an inspiration and a vision and stuck with it.

Hell, the game comments on that with its themes and messaging, both of Max's past and MP in relation to modern games.

Posted by Dallas_Raines
@Hailinel

I guess I don't understand the notion that it's somehow OK that Bioware locked content some would find necessary to enjoy the ending in any way behind a pay wall. It's basically saying "If you didn't enjoy the ending, pay them more and experience it again."

What.

And yet...Final Fantasy XIII-2, one of your most beloved games did EXACTLY the same thing as ME3 with that bullshit Lightning DLC.
Posted by buft

@heatDrive88 said:

Seeing Dave Lang type up his Mass Effect 3 entry as an Elcor makes everything in this world worth it.

same, at first i was reading thinking that something was wierd then i reread it and laughed my ass off, remembering the conversations i have had with the elcor over the years

Posted by Hailinel

@Dallas_Raines said:

@Hailinel

I guess I don't understand the notion that it's somehow OK that Bioware locked content some would find necessary to enjoy the ending in any way behind a pay wall. It's basically saying "If you didn't enjoy the ending, pay them more and experience it again."

What.

And yet...Final Fantasy XIII-2, one of your most beloved games did EXACTLY the same thing as ME3 with that bullshit Lightning DLC.

Where did I say it was one of my most beloved? I don't even count it among my ten best of the year.

Posted by Brendan

Loved the Mass Effect entry.

Posted by ChuckDeNomolos

Dave Lang reppin' Max Payne 3!

Posted by JohnnyV

Fuck Dave Lang ;)

Posted by dvdwalker8

Glad to see someone else put Max Payne 3 on their list.

Online
Posted by dropabombonit

Finally some Max Payne 3 love, the Lang zone is where it's at

Posted by BBQBram
@Quintessence said:

I read the Mass Effect 3 section in an elcor voice!

Haha, me too! Hilarious. 
 
And finally some recognition for Max Payne 3. I feel like it got the short end of the stick for having a learning curve and not playing like other shooters.
Posted by cosi83

Payne 3 and Sine Mora. Gots to love Dave Lang

Posted by MeatSim

The Lang Zone has some fun games in it.

Posted by Phatmac

I'm with Lang in that I just want a Halo ass Hslo game and that's more than enough for me.

Posted by Little_Socrates

I couldn't read your commentary on ME3 in the Elcor voice, but I tried.

Sleeeeeeeepy daaaaaaaaaaawgs.

Posted by Hangnail

Oh dear lord, someone finally mentions Max Payne 3! A shooter comes out and actually gets the "shooting" part exceptionally right, earns a lot of praise for it, then gets snubbed by nearly every end-of-the-year publication on the internet; what gives?

Posted by mrfluke

@Hangnail said:

Oh dear lord, someone finally mentions Max Payne 3! A shooter comes out and actually gets the "shooting" part exceptionally right, earns a lot of praise for it, then gets snubbed by nearly every end-of-the-year publication on the internet; what gives?

i agree with you that the shooting was satisfying

but everything else was kinda forgettable, as i couldnt relate or care about max payne or any of what was going on in the story, except for near the end of the game when you're in the airport and your shooting all those guys with that song playing behind it. ( i know perfect description :P)

Posted by GaspoweR

@mrfluke said:

@Hangnail said:

Oh dear lord, someone finally mentions Max Payne 3! A shooter comes out and actually gets the "shooting" part exceptionally right, earns a lot of praise for it, then gets snubbed by nearly every end-of-the-year publication on the internet; what gives?

i agree with you that the shooting was satisfying

but everything else was kinda forgettable, as i couldnt relate or care about max payne or any of what was going on in the story, except for near the end of the game when you're in the airport and your shooting all those guys with that song playing behind it. ( i know perfect description :P)

The story essentially is that HE IS THE WORST BODYGUARD EVER.

Posted by bybeach

Max Payne is redeemable when he is dead. His absolute best of intentions subverted by a predilection for certain drugs(the pain relieving kind) and unmitigated grief wrenching tragedy.. I'm surprised just doesn;t take himself out one of these days....not in the story but....why?

Posted by FakeKisser

Great read!