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E3 Needs to Grow Up

Despite a growing call for change, the organizers of E3 have no plans to address the booth babe issue at the industry's biggest show.

I'm sure these women are well versed in the talking points for Namco Bandai's upcoming fighting game.

There’s been no shortage of discussion about women and video games this past week.

The conversation’s been driven by the gross response to Anita Sarkeesian’s nearly finished Kickstarter about the unfortunate and exclusionary tropes of female video game characters, and the quickly scrutinized comments from a producer on Tomb Raider about a potential rape scene (a description the studio has walked back) in the new game.

These are all good, uncomfortable conversations to have, but if we're talking about the depiction of women in games at such a serious level, how do we still have E3 booth babes? Other than for easy hits in web galleries, anyway.

The commonly referred to booth babe (also known as a "woman") is hired solely to wear skimpy clothing with a game or company’s logo and take photographs with attendees (who does that, by the way?). Typically, they are not well versed in the product they are hired to represent.

It seemed like a good time to check in with the Entertainment Software Association, who manages E3.

Despite some of the recent heated conversation, there are no plans to shift E3 policies.

"Exhibitors determine for themselves what is the best representation for their companies. Models are welcome if companies would like to have them, but that's an individual exhibitor decision,” said ESA VP of media relations and event management Dan Hewitt in an emailed statement to me yesterday.

Ghost Recon Commander designer Brenda Brathwaite sparked a vocal debate on Twitter over booth babes before she headed to the E3 show floor last Thursday.

“I dread heading off to work at E3 today,” she said. “The show is a constant assault on the female self esteem no matter which direction I look. I am in good shape, yet it is impossible not to compare. I feel uncomfortable. It is as if I walked into a strip club w/o intending to. These are the policies of @e3expo and @RichatESA. I feel uncomfortable in an industry I helped found.”

Her comments found plenty of support, such as Inside Network managing editor AJ Glasser.

@br The worst is when I get so good at seeing right through it that I forget they're actually women underneath the barely-there clothes.

— AJ Glasser (@Joygirl007) June 7, 2012

It’s not a new critique, but it was louder this year, and there seems to be a growing desire for change.

There was also the usual “what’s the big deal?” responses, including 3D Realms co-founder George Broussard.

@br I think you/others take it too seriously. It's not some academic event. It's a glitz show full of spectacle. #serious_business

— George Broussard (@georgeb3dr) June 7, 2012

It’s been a few years, but the ESA policy on booth babes has changed from E3's inception. The last major shift came in 2006, as new penalties, fines and policies were introduced regarding women featured in E3 exhibits.

"What's new in 2006 is an update and clarification of the enforcement policies; as we do from time to time, we have taken steps to ensure that exhibitors are familiar with the policy and how it will be enforced," said E3 show director Mary Dolaher to Reuters at the time.

A violation of the clothing policy would result in, at first, a warning, and then a $5,000 fine. Here’s what the handbook from 2006 said to exhibitors considering booth babes--er, sorry, live models:

"Material, including live models, conduct that is sexually explicit and/or sexually provocative, including but not limited to nudity, partial nudity and bathing suit bottoms, are prohibited on the show floor, all common areas, and at any access points to the show."

Hewitt told me there have been no changes to ESA policy since 2006.

Maybe there should be. Consider this anecdote that didn’t even take place on the show floor itself.

This was one of the first results the search term "Devil May Cry strippers" gave me, sorry.

We arrived to our Capcom appointment, I plunked down with Lost Planet 3, and Alex Navarro was ushered over to play Devil May Cry. In a room of kiosks, there were pole dancers. It’s unclear what that has to do with Devil May Cry. The girl hired to skimpily waltz around was sitting on the floor, looking bored. Everyone in the room is focused on playing the game, and Alex wasn't playing Devil May Cry in a see-through bubble. No one on the show floor could see this room. Can someone explain how this helps anyone do their job?

Elsewhere, I refused to play any 3DS games at Nintendo’s booth because the company didn’t have a table with machines, and instead tethered its lineup to attractive women. I let that gimmick slide when Nintendo pulled the same trick at the original 3DS unveiling, but I’ll just wait until those games are out now, thanks.

Nintendo probably thought it was a cute idea. I doubt (and this is my sincere hope) Nintendo meant to undermine the credibility of women at gaming’s biggest show. It's still ignorance. Many of the issues regarding women and E3 aren’t overtly offensive, and can be easily rationalized by those who don’t see a problem.

That’s okay--we should have a debate about it.

And this is all hardly an issue that’s exclusive to games. The same week as E3, the Computex Summit was happening in Taipei, and computer manufacturer ASUS sent out the following tweet:

That tweet has since been deleted and ASUS released an apology, obviously.

I can gripe all I want, but the most effective solution has to come from the ESA itself. Only the ESA can enforce regulations on exhibitors, and let them know this archaic marketing tool needs to go away. If games are growing up, so does the way we go about advertising them in front of, ostensibly, a bunch of professional. This isn’t 1994.

PAX figured this out years ago, even if there have been incidents along the way (i.e. Lollipop Chainsaw at PAX East).

“Our definition of a ‘booth babe’ has been a model (male or female) that has been hired to stand/sit in skimpy clothing to market the product,” said Penny Arcade president of business development in 2010. “If that person knows the product inside and out then it’s less of an issue. A company representative that can interact with attendees in a way that provides value as opposed to ‘hey stare at my body’ is something that we encourage whether or not that representative is physically attractive or not.”

If E3 is supposed to represent the industry’s best, why can’t it figure out how to respect its own attendees?

Patrick Klepek on Google+
1013 Comments
Posted by DamianOgre

Being a somewhat attractive older man I sometimes get people and women talking to me out of the blue. Recently I had a "cute" check out girl start telling me how a much older man recently hit on her. I have to admit that I had serveral lines to choose from and choose her lane because of her looks. If having booth babes gets people over and then buyers over to check out the commotion, then more power to them. These girls may have many stories about why their there. In the end its just a job where they can make a buck by looking good. Let E3 be.

Posted by Giantstalker

This is the topic of the week in gaming these days? I can't imagine most players legitimately even care - I know I don't.

Count the number of women in Call of Duty or Battlefield and you'll probably see why...

Posted by PeezMachine

@FengShuiGod said:

Then you should probably just get rid of E3 altogether. I'm not against the idea. While developers can get together and talk on something like the Bombcast, I think that is more of an exception to the rule. Mostly E3 is style over substance - mostly games are style over substance- and to get away from this the industry should move away from the nonsensical hype machine that is E3.

Amen. Back in the day (2006?) E3 got toned down to a "closed doors only" affair for a while, but it didn't get rid of the problem - it simply traded in a glitzy hype machine for an exclusive hype machine, so I'm not surprised it didn't win over many fans. So far the only site (Giantbomb included) that has had a lot of good stuff to read from E3 has been the incredible Penny Arcade Report, which went out its way to "de-E3-ify" things and talk about games like a reasonable human being. God forbid our tradeshows actually encourage that sort of journalism.

Posted by Claude
@YukoAsho said:


@Claude said:

This article is rather one sided. Why not contact some models that were used and ask their opinion. Contact their agency or the companies that hired them as well. It feels like a very liberal stance as in, we need to protect these women from themselves. I guess they don't have a mind of their own.

I wouldn't say it's a blanket liberal position. If anything, there's hints of classical American puritanism in the viewpoint, that women who openly express their sexuality are a blemish on the larger society. One can find both far-left and far-right leanings in this discussion, which is probably why it has such perpetual traction. Whether the view is that men should be protecting women from themselves or rather it's scantily clad women being a travesty/embarrassment/distraction, extreme stupidity can be found all over.

Still, I think this is just blatant page-hit grabbing, just like the FGC issue a couple of months ago was quickly forgotten after Patrick found something else to chew on. If people actually gave a shit about being respectable, E3 would still be what it was in 07 and 08.

Or the enthusiast press could boycott the event. And while they're at it, don't play video games with overtly sexualized female characters.
Posted by Salarn

@Anund said:

@Salarn said:

@Anund said:

That girl who was upset there were women at E3 more attractive than her? I'm sorry, I can't care about that.

http://www.giantbomb.com/brenda-brathwaite/72-7744/

Please don't refer to one of the top female developers in the game industry as "that girl".

And why is that? What should I call her? I don't know the name, never heard of her before. Stop hyper ventilating, fella.

Your icon is from Jagged Alliance 2, a game she was a developer for.

Posted by Manhattan_Project

@Azraden said:

@Manhattan_Project: Good job (intentionally?) missing the point. This article does a really good job of refuting all the points people make. Even if you're not a fan of the Hulk speak, its well worth reading on the problems with the dialogue in that game. http://filmcrithulk.wordpress.com/2011/10/21/hulk-vs-arkham-city-round-2-bitches-be-trippin/

So its lazy writing and its not up to the caliber of Nolans storytelling? So what? That doesn't make it sexist. Not everyone can be Nolan. And on top of that, I don't think its that lazy. Just like I don't think Roger Sterling on Mad Men saying random sexist things is lazy, its just what someone like him would say. And again it doesn't make Mad Men sexist. (Please don't try to tell me Mad Men is sexist)

I would also remind you that a movie is nothing like a game and the systems at play in both are dramatically different.

One last thing correct me if I'm wrong but I don't remember any characters that hated women in either of Nolans Batman movies.

P.S. I didn't read all the points just the one that pertained to me because that site crashed my browser 5 or 6 times.

Edited by Brackynews
TGS 2006 Blue Dragon booth obscured by Microsoft's attendants. (CC by-nc-nd)
Edited by ShaneDev

Since booth babes are specific to E3 and effect journalists and the press why don't you all band together and petition or complain to the people in charge to get it changed? If you're serious about this and people are upset then why not try and change things.

The coverage I watch online of E3 contains very few images of booth babes and is always about the games. The press conferences which huge numbers of people watch feature no booth babes. I don't mean to sound dismissive but this booth babe discussion is brought up every year and I don't think it effects the image of the industry all that much. It also never changes, with the same complaints every year and people do nothing.

I think journalists maybe aren't sure how much of E3 is actually broadcast because for all the talk of booth babes and E3 I saw none. I was watching some Gametrailers, Gamespot and other random sites coverage and it was always about the games. Maybe that's just me but I don't think it effects the image of the industry as much as some journalists think it does.

I have to disagree that the cry for change is any louder this year than before. It's the same every year and then as other posters said it is forgotten until after the next E3. E3 is for the press why don't the press tell the organizers that they don't want them there, if every year they say they don't want them there?

Posted by Dixavd

It seems to me from the yearly E3 press coverage that Nintendo's "booth babes" seem to be one of the least offensive of the bunch as they seem to know how to properlly showcase the games that they have (with more knowledge than it seems some E3 attendies have about gaming). Going by the heavily edited and very small amount of showcasing I see of E3 everyyear, they at least seemed good enough on knowledge to answer some questions about the games mechanics and show the player wha thtye need to do at specific points... however since I only see the parts people specifically put in their videos when talking about E3, I am unsure if they just happen to pick clips of those people (or they just quickly learn that knowledge after watching a hundred previous people play the same demo)?

I am not trying to defend them by the way (I still hate the concept of booth babes, whatever gender or body shape shown as I am just against the idea of a gaming booth trying to catch people's eyes with something vastly unrelated to the actual game); I just want to know if the ideas that have been implied (about Nintendo's women being slightly more knowledgable on gaming than most) are related in any form to reality or if they are still the outliers and I just don't get to see the vast majority as they don't make the cut of E3 videos (maybe due to them believing they aren't as interesting for viewers obviously there to hear about the latest games from the show floor)?

I still am not a fan of booth babes though, I like the spectacle of E3 but I like it better when they make interesting sculptures and things (such as the Epic Mickey booth this year) but find the booth babe stuff and random professional singers brought along to the avent to be extremely tacky.

Also, doesn't PAX and other events higher professional cosplayers to walk about in skimpy clothing for events (both men and women, along with cosplayers not dressed like that such as those who dreas as Alien from the Alien franchise etc..)? Should those places put regulations in (ala the idea of E3 doing it) making sure those cosplaying are within set rules or what they can wear - or simply making it so they have to be into the franchise they are showcasing (because as much as I would like to think all of them cosplay because they like the medium and characters, there are definitely those there who see it as a stepping stone into working as an Actress, or being the next "nerd culture - idol")? I just can't see how you can ban these sorts of booth babes from E3 but be ok with the paid cosplaying for the same effect at other events - and at the same time I don't see how you can properly enforce it at events that are open to the public (not including E3 obviously) where developers/publishers could just privately pay for people to walk in as apart of the public dressed as one of their characters and hang around near that game (at least I can't see it without then regulating all public cosplaying). It seems like an issue I want the gaming industry to face, I just don't want it to spiral out of control to the point of events not allowing women to go to them because they think they "don't fit in" or "don't seem to care about gaming enough", because they are very subjective regulations which could easily happen if the reactions against booth babes escalate too fast and too strict.

I like the idea though, I just think it is a little more complicated than most are making it out to be.

Posted by Anwar

@Salarn said:

@Anund said:

@Salarn said:

@Anund said:

That girl who was upset there were women at E3 more attractive than her? I'm sorry, I can't care about that.

http://www.giantbomb.com/brenda-brathwaite/72-7744/

Please don't refer to one of the top female developers in the game industry as "that girl".

And why is that? What should I call her? I don't know the name, never heard of her before. Stop hyper ventilating, fella.

Your icon is from Jagged Alliance 2, a game she was a developer for.

Do you really expect people to know every single developer of a game when they're using a picture from a game as avatar? Christ Almighty that is some ridiculous nonsense.

Posted by XenturiK

don't take jobs away from people. those women arn't being forced their doing their job. Stop trying to take money out of thier pockets

Edited by megalowho

@YukoAsho said:

@Alkaiser said:

Probably. Either I don't pay enough attention to E3 in general or I've become unstuck in time and it all rolls together in my head.

God, has Kinect been around a couple years already?

Makes you feel old, doesn't it?

@Claude said:

This article is rather one sided. Why not contact some models that were used and ask their opinion. Contact their agency or the companies that hired them as well. It feels like a very liberal stance as in, we need to protect these women from themselves. I guess they don't have a mind of their own.

I wouldn't say it's a blanket liberal position. If anything, there's hints of classical American puritanism in the viewpoint, that women who openly express their sexuality are a blemish on the larger society. One can find both far-left and far-right leanings in this discussion, which is probably why it has such perpetual traction. Whether the view is that men should be protecting women from themselves or rather it's scantily clad women being a travesty/embarrassment/distraction, extreme stupidity can be found all over.

Still, I think this is just blatant page-hit grabbing, just like the FGC issue a couple of months ago was quickly forgotten after Patrick found something else to chew on. If people actually gave a shit about being respectable, E3 would still be what it was in 07 and 08.

All I know is that as an adult male who gets marketing, I don't appreciate being pandered to. If you can't sell your game without enticing lonely nerds to check it out via tits and tight shirts, you don't have a game worth selling. Unless that's what the product is specifically about. It's the same reason I found Bulletstorm's marketing distasteful, even if the game itself is pretty cool. I can't really extract any politics from that, though I can see how the overall topic could.

Also this article (and the series on FGC controversy) may generate hits and heated discussion, but Patrick has put some effort into what he puts down that makes them worthwhile reads. Contacting the head of the ESA and others for comment, for example. If it was only about the hits, he'd have just slapped together a paragraph of flame bait and left us to go at it.

Posted by AngelN7

@YukoAsho said:

@Dag

This is my line of thinking too. The people who can change it are ESA, the presenters, and the Journalists, I am none of the above.

Not sure I agree with that. If people stopped watching the booth babe montages, the booth babes would probably not be so prominent at the show.

Yeah but who produces those "booth babes montages"? ... game "journalist" so people can watch them, because that's what they want people to do? or not? I don't even know anymore.

Posted by ManMadeGod

Didn't everyone get upset when e3 was downsized and the boothbabes were gone? I remember more than one outlet reporting about it. I really wish patrick would discuss this on the bombcast this tuesday. The companies are simply responding to what the journalists want. Does G4 spending airtime on boothbabes "undermine the credibility of women at gaming’s biggest show"?

Or how about Eurogamer: "The breast show is in town". "Still, some tits ought to make everything much more digestible."

You can't ignore the press if you want to have a debate.

Edited by Amoveo
The thing about all the hullabaloo that I hate is there's this undertone that a man shouldn't be allowed to look at an attractive women or appreciate her only for her appearance in a wholly incidental context. That somehow getting enjoyment out of looking at a pretty woman makes us misogynists or rapists. God forbid a man ever experience a purely physical attraction with a women that he will never interact with in a meaningful manner, because looking at boobs turns all men into monsters, apparently.
If there was a trade show whose attendees were primary women and the vendors used hunky guys to promote their products, would any male in the audience here give a fuck about it? I really don't care if a women gets a rise out of looking at an attractive man. I really don't care if all they only see that man as a sexy man - and I'm betting he doesn't either. It doesn't degrade me in any way - it doesn't even degrade the model because he's not in a context where he should even care about the people's opinions of him.
In the sense that booth babes are marketing that doesn't actually speak to the quality of the product - yes they're not doing any good; and if they were banned, it's not a big deal. This isn't an anti-booth-babe-banning argument. However, the feminist angle that always comes in about it being degrading to women (all women, everywhere) is just bullshit. A guy can appreciate an attractive women without thinking of all women as sex objects; and if the situation were reversed (with male models that I hereby dub: stand studs) no rational man would take issue with it.

@Sweetz This is the only interesting argument I've seen for booth babes and strikes at the heart of the issue. The feminist hypothesis is that looking at women as sex objects reduces men's perception of all women and dehumanizes them. This is a debatable assertion. This is a larger conversation that is going on and booth babes are an example of it.

I'd personally agree with the feminist hypothesis I think that when men view women as sex objects that they can hire to stand around looking attractive they are less likely and able to respect women who aren't being paid to look attractive. I can respect anyone who like Sweetz can respect women as people and separate appearance from personality and value both. Thats the ideal thing for a man to do, but I think that there is a danger that people less mature than you can take appreciating women only for their appearance to a dark place fast, it won't always happen but it seems to happen a lot.

For example there are these comments and this general attitude that women are whores and that we men are being sexually exploited by women we paid to wear skimpy outfits. This is deplorable. These women are voluntarily working as models no one said that they were being abducted. But what they are doing is harming the perception of women and the way men treat women (assuming the feminist hypothesis is true.) This is a problem that we should be talking about regardless of how the women involved feel about it, its bigger than them.

Posted by ZenaxPure

@patrickklepek said:

This has nothing to do with the women themselves. This has everything to do with how it portrays the industry. I don't begrudge the women for taking a job--it's money

Sorry Patrick, but how? Not once in your article does it talk about how this portrays negatively on the video game industry. The middle of the article is about a female developer who wants them gone because it makes her uncomfortable, the end of the article is how this effects every industry, not just games. If anything the article seems rather aimless, re-reading it I can't even pick out a main point that it's about.

If you're point is simply that attractive ladies used to show off video games is wrong, then tell me how that is, this article does not do that in the least. Like others, and even your article has said, this is not something that is exclusive to video games. Are you saying everything should change? It really doesn't make any sense.

Edited by Anund

@Salarn said:

@Anund said:

@Salarn said:

@Anund said:

That girl who was upset there were women at E3 more attractive than her? I'm sorry, I can't care about that.

http://www.giantbomb.com/brenda-brathwaite/72-7744/

Please don't refer to one of the top female developers in the game industry as "that girl".

And why is that? What should I call her? I don't know the name, never heard of her before. Stop hyper ventilating, fella.

Your icon is from Jagged Alliance 2, a game she was a developer for.

That means she's good. I still don't know her name. Nor the name of any of the other developers of that game. I also don't know the name of a single developer on Baldur's Gate 2, Rome: Total War or Uncharted, even though I love those games. What can I tell you? I don't care about the names of game developers.

And even if I did, I wouldn't support her in this particular issue. If she feels uncomfortable because there are attractive women at E3, that is her problem, not theirs.

Posted by Napalm

There's a fucking lot more harming the industry right now than some booth babes hired for the week for a videogame convention. I'm tired of people blowing this shit out of proportion and making it such a big deal.

Edited by Dallas_Raines

Women(and men) who write about games and develop games shouldn't have to go to a sleazy ass strip club just to do their jobs.

Posted by laserbolts

It's weird that there are dudes that want to get their pictures taken with the booth babes. Or maybe it's just me.

Posted by Luthorcrow

Banning booth babes is not going to help the industry grow up. The fact is models or both babes are common at many industry trade shows. I think banning them based on supposed moral or political grounds just seems wrong headed. Maybe have some limits on what is reasonable but the rest should be left up to the individual companies. If you are offended by how they market their materials then don't buy their games. But moralizing or trying to politicize the issue just seems a bit naive to me.

Posted by Anwar

@ShaneDev said:

Since booth babes are specific to E3 and effect journalists and the press why don't you all band to together and petition or complain to the people in charge to get it changed? If you're serious about this and people are upset then why not try and change things.

The coverage I watch online of E3 contains very few images of booth babes and is always about the games. The press conferences which huge numbers of people watch feature no booth babes. I don't mean to sound dismissive but this booth babe discussion is brought up every year and I don't think it effects the image of the industry all that much. It also never changes, with the same complaints every year and people do nothing.

I think journalists maybe aren't sure how much of E3 is actually broadcast because for all the talk of booth babes and E3 I saw none. I was watching some Gametrailers, Gamespot and other random sites coverage and it was always about the games. Maybe that's just me but I don't think it effects the image of the industry as much as some journalists think it does.

I have to disagree that the cry for change is any louder this year than before. It's the same every year and then as other posters said it is forgotten until after the next E3. E3 is for the press why don't the press tell the organizers that they don't want them there, if every year they say they don't want them there?

I think Geoff Keighley would tell the people who organize the E3 booths what's what(I don't know who's responsible for that, publishers probably?). Say what you will about him, but him calling out Reggie live on TV about Arkham City and last year about the mediocre 3DS launch lineup is one of the most journalistic ANYTHING that I've seen a video game journalist do. Talking shit in articles and on podcast is happening often, but face to face not so much.

Edited by Brodehouse

Do booth babes actually increase the traffic that much? Are those people there for the attractive women or for the games? If they're not actually generating traffic, I wonder why they're there. That seems like a waste of money. If they are, I think you should maybe get mad at the people who visit booths only to see female flesh, rather than moralize with businesses. Businesses are here to make a dollar and a cent. The problem is consumers who think with their dicks.

As much as I feel for the producer who feels body issues when she has to attend events where models are working... that's such an unreasonable stance to take. We're going to legislate against attractive people being in your eyesight? I'm ugly and in bad shape myself, I have to deal with more attractive people all day long, nobody gives a rat's ass about how I feel. I'm not sure I can take 'the way you look makes me feel bad about myself' as a reasonable argument.

Posted by jakob187

That's one side of the argument, Patrick. Where's the other side?

I know, that sounds kind of shifty. "Wait, there's a side to defend the objectification of women?" Sure. There's two sides to every argument, right?

The other side of this is simple: movies and music are still just as immature, maybe even more so than gaming. Therefore, if you are saying "E3 needs to grow up", then it means you also need to say "awards shows for movies and music need to grow up". Booth babes are regular ladies and models getting paid to do what they do: model and be pretty. Meanwhile, celebrities are getting paid MILLIONS to wear Gucci on the red carpet and show off how well their double-sided tape can keep their braless tits from flopping out of their dress.

Afterwards, those people all go into some center or theatre or whatever and pass out awards to shows that essentially focus on the ideas of infidelity, sexual fantasy, and feature absolutely immature acts. I mean, for fuck's sake, Lonely Island sang a song called "I Just Had Sex" on NATIONAL TELEVISION...and we're sitting here talking about "yeah, these chicks that were hired by the exhibitor...it's just a little too far and pointless to have".

It's not pointless to the exhibitor themselves. Whether you and your colleagues like it just means you have an opinion on it...and that's it. Once you are the exhibitor, then you make the decisions.

Besides, those of us who are gamers and do our research.... It's not like booth babes are our focus at E3 anyways. We're looking at the games. Booth babes register at about, like, 10 or 11 on most of our radars as "things about E3 we care about". Therefore, I think it speaks volumes to the audience themselves if they aren't reacting to the booth babes themselves but instead to the games and tech that is being shown.

Basically, I'm saying "booth babes are the icing on the cake if that's your thing".

It may be annoying as a gaming journalist to see this happening, and it's definitely annoying to see female producers and female game developers having issues with being comfortable on the show floor. However, the other option is that the show becomes beyond self-serious and you lose part of the spectacle. Remember what THAT was like...when E3 turned into this miniscule thing in an airplane hangar? That was awesome, right? Everyone loved it. -_-

So I'm sorry if I feel the need to say "it honestly doesn't matter nearly as much as people think it does, because if those girls didn't want to be booth babes, they'd be turning down those jobs".

Posted by Godlyawesomeguy

YOUR FACE NEEDS TO GROW UP

Posted by JDillinger

Honestly, I don't give a shit.

Edited by SmilingPig

Sex sell's, if there would be a boot babe in every giant bomb video, they would attract a larger audience.

IGN knew that and that why they have a game babe section, and look at them now... Ok bad example but you get the point.

Posted by Brackynews

@Anund: Do you perhaps care that Brathwaite is engaged to John Romero? Is that a name you know?

Posted by Hailinel

@jakob187 said:

That's one side of the argument, Patrick. Where's the other side?

Seriously. This article is nothing more than one-sided editorializing.

Online
Posted by Napalm

@Hailinel said:

@jakob187 said:

That's one side of the argument, Patrick. Where's the other side?

Seriously. This article is nothing more than one-sided editorializing.

I love both of you.

Posted by Anund

@Brackynews said:

@Anund: Do you perhaps care that Brathwaite is engaged to John Romero? Is that a name you know?

He's the guy who made that bad game everyone hated.

Posted by PenguinDust

What I've learned from this omnipresent topic this week is that I'm a bad person for being attracted to pretty women. The admission that I enjoy seeing them in movies and video games is apparently hateful and I am the worst type of human being imaginable. I guess it's back to paging through the Sears catalogue for pictures of exposed ankles. That's probably wrong, too.

Posted by coakroach

Way to go George Broussard.

Ugh.

Posted by SexualBubblegumX

Feminists are complaining about booth babes? Really they may as well complain about the bikini girls at boat shows. Feminazis are idiots. -.-

Edited by jakob187

@Hailinel said:

@jakob187 said:

That's one side of the argument, Patrick. Where's the other side?

Seriously. This article is nothing more than one-sided editorializing.

I never know if you are being sarcastic or not. -_-

I don't know. I have a very European sense when it comes to both sexuality and nudity - meaning "fuck it, let people get naked because it's better than violence".

Posted by Jace

I fail to see the problem here. Brenda seems like just another person trying to get attention. If I went to E3 and a bunch of ripped men with no shirts were showing games, I wouldn't fucking whine about it as if it were the end of the world.

TL;DR: Brenda has internal self-esteem issues that she vents via blaming it on external factors and people willing to bandwagon on her pity train.

Posted by Anund

@PenguinDust said:

What I've learned from this omnipresent topic this week is that I'm a bad person for being attracted to pretty women. The admission that I enjoy seeing them in movies and video games is apparently hateful and I am the worst type of human being imaginable. I guess it's back to paging through the Sears catalogue for pictures of exposed ankles. That's probably wrong, too.

You're basically a rapist, man. You support rape.

Posted by McQuinn

Patrick, I feel you should stick to reporting the news and instead of trying to write it. I always feel you come off a bit pretentious. Not that there is any strong reason behind models in a video game environment, but that's how advertisement works. E3 isn't a business meeting, it's a trade show. I'm sure it'll change its self in time, but you forcing this issue into the news only makes me hate you.

Edited by TheHumanDove

@Anund said:

@PenguinDust said:

What I've learned from this omnipresent topic this week is that I'm a bad person for being attracted to pretty women. The admission that I enjoy seeing them in movies and video games is apparently hateful and I am the worst type of human being imaginable. I guess it's back to paging through the Sears catalogue for pictures of exposed ankles. That's probably wrong, too.

You're basically a rapist, man. You support rape.

Subconsciously a rapist.

Posted by UncleBenny

I want to know what the crowd reaction regarding "booth babes" would be if we reverse the situation. Look, we just need a game company to have the guts to go ahead and show off their booth with bunch of attractive male in skimpy shorts. Maybe Summer Camp Studios can have Fart Cat app on iphone tethered to to said "booth babe" at the next E3, I like to see where the crowd reaction goes.

Posted by aquamarin

I'd prefer keeping the booth babes around, I like hearing awkward stories about them on various E3 recaps.

Posted by falling_fast

if videogames want to lose their stigma as being only for nerdy, shut-in, women-hating males, and designed by the same, they should really get rid of the booth babes. Nothing against them as people, but it's stupid to have them there, and it makes us all look bad.

Posted by yoshisaur

I don't understand the need to remove the women from the show. How about changing the way journalists in general respond to this? I mean, should we now remove all beautiful women from television shows because were afraid every man-child is going to fap to their image?

How about the people that attend the E3 show grow up a little. It seems you're just arguing at the fact that it's easier to remove the women than it is for E3 to expect it's childish crowd to think with their brains and not their penis'.

Edited by NMC2008

It's always about women eh? Damn. -_- Ah well. I am sorry PK but I disagree with your article. I am tired of seeing people saying everything needs to grow up, why? It's probably one of the most annoying things right now, especially in gaming. Hey, these games need to grow up and be more mature, why? What will it accomplish exactly? Why do video games need to grow up and be more mature, it feels like you want to be accepted by the outsiders and have gaming be respected and or noticed by the outsiders(that's the only word I can think of, sorry, it sounds kinda stupid), why can't we just take shit for what it is and have fun? I don't see the movie and music industry making these efforts, why gaming? I guess I don't understand, but I will not sit here and bad mouth the idea, so, if you think so then that's cool, but I don't think so and I guess that's ok too.

Have a Nice Weekend Yall, I have games to play. :)

Posted by Hailinel

@jakob187 said:

@Hailinel said:

@jakob187 said:

That's one side of the argument, Patrick. Where's the other side?

Seriously. This article is nothing more than one-sided editorializing.

I never know if you are being sarcastic or not. -_-

I don't know. I have a very European sense when it comes to both sexuality and nudity - meaning "fuck it, let people get naked because it's better than violence".

I'm not being sarcastic.

Online
Edited by Nasix

Oh boy, here we go, another non-issue that everyone's talking about. Guys, I understand E3 sucked this year, but stop drumming up this whole feminism thing when it makes no difference.

I don't care about booth babes. I know they're all hired to promote games with their bodies, and so they're useless. That's why I pay no attention to them. However, there's something missing here that most people don't understand when talking about them: they ALSO know they're hired to promote games with their bodies.

People look at this as if it's some kind of giant man-dominated conspiracy to control women's bodies. As if. All of these girls took the job willingly, they were not forced into it. If you're going to blame anybody, you can place some blame on them for choosing to do this.

From reading the article, Brenda Brathwaite needs to get some damn self esteem. I'm not a good looking guy. By all accounts, most guys on the street look a ton better than I do. When I go to the gym, believe me I'm not exactly the type to have a commanding presence. I'm not intimidated, though. Oh god forbid people look better than you do. It's such a big deal.

Here's the biggest problem, though. Why do people think that because there are booth babes, our minds will suddenly become corrupt and we will start objectifying women? "Don't put the pretty girls out there, they might make all the men drooly rapists!"

I know that's a strawman, but it's ridiculous to think that showing some pretty ladies will suddenly lead to misogynistic behaviour or something.

Don't like booth babes? Don't look at them.

Posted by Salarn

@Anund said:

What can I tell you? I don't care about the names of game developers.

And even if I did, I wouldn't support her in this particular issue. If she feels uncomfortable because there are attractive women at E3, that is her problem, not theirs.

I <3 You.

You know nothing about her, yet decide her view on E3 should be discarded and she shouldn't attend E3 if she doesn't like the state of the industry that she works in to provide games that you enjoy.

Edited by kerse

I just find it insulting as a male who likes to play video games. Do they think we're sitting here drooling over these women going oh I gotta buy that game now cause of all the sexy girls. I think the example of Alex and the pole dancer sitting there bored is great, because the show is about video games.

Edited by jakob187

@Hailinel said:

@jakob187 said:

@Hailinel said:

@jakob187 said:

That's one side of the argument, Patrick. Where's the other side?

Seriously. This article is nothing more than one-sided editorializing.

I never know if you are being sarcastic or not. -_-

I don't know. I have a very European sense when it comes to both sexuality and nudity - meaning "fuck it, let people get naked because it's better than violence".

I'm not being sarcastic.

I don't even know if THAT is sarcastic. You and me butt heads so often, it's difficult to believe that you actually agree with something I stated. o_O

I'm keeping my eye on you. Both of them...

@Nasix said:

From reading the article, Brenda Brathwaite needs to get some damn self esteem. I'm not a good looking guy. By all accounts, most guys on the street look a ton better than I do. When I go to the gym, believe me I'm not exactly the type to have a commanding presence. I'm not intimidated, though. Oh god forbid people look better than you do. It's such a big deal.

Part of me will say "yeah, you are right...I'm a fat guy and I have some self-esteem issues, but overall, I don't really ever care because fuck people. At the same time, I can understand where this is a trade show for businessmen...and the idea of scantily-clad women at what is supposed to be a professional event is basically...well, kind of dumb.

However, everything that Brenda said just makes me think "seriously, you worked on Ghost Recon and you are worried about being uncomfortable about the BOOTH BABES?"