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Indie Game: The Movie: An Honest and Important Look at Independent Game Development

Two Canadian filmmakers explore the hardships and triumphs of independent game development in this genuinely great documentary.

A man sits hunched over his keyboard. It's some ungodly hour of the morning, and he sits, staring at his computer screen. He subsists on a steady diet of soda and coffee, and appears not to have seen the sun in weeks. He has no social life, though this is largely of his own design. He doesn't have time for people, because he has a game to finish. The strings of code that dominate his computer monitor might as well be gibberish to most, but to the figure slumped in his office chair, it's the foundation of a video game, one that he is furiously trying to finish in order to complete it by an important marketing deadline.

This is an image that's probably all too familiar for those of us who count ourselves as enthusiasts of the video game industry. We at least have some idea of what it takes to make a game, independent or otherwise. But to those who are only tangentially familiar with what goes into these trifling digital entertainments of ours, it's a striking image. The idea of suffering for one's art is hardly anything new, but to those who don't necessarily consider video games to be art, it's an unfamiliar experience to see someone putting so much of their heart and soul into games where sentient meat sacks dodge giant saw blades and fight evil cybernetic babies with top hats and monocles.

This is what makes Indie Game: The Movie, the recently-toured documentary from Canadian filmmakers Lisanne Pijot and James Swirsky, so great and, frankly, important. There aren't very many documentaries about video games in general, a point that James and Lisanne echoed both during a Q&A at a New York City screening I attended, and in a Skype conversation I had with them yesterday. More to the point, there are even fewer documentaries about video games that are able to put the experience of game development in relatable terms to those who don't necessarily have more than a passing interest in gaming. Indie Game: The Movie does exactly that. It shows the pains and struggles of people trying to create something they're passionate about creating. It doesn't matter if they're making a video game or a film or an erotic cake. What they're making means something to these people, and by proxy of the talented filmmakers, what they're making means something to us, too.

Those of you who spend a lot of time perusing video game sites probably already have an idea of the stories contained within Indie Game: The Movie, but for those who aren't aware, a brief refresher. The film follows the development and post-development experiences of three different game makers: Fez creator Phil Fish, Team Meat members Edmund McMillen and Tommy Refenes, and enigmatic Braid designer Jonathan Blow. The three stories are varied in scope and stress--Blow, for instance, has no new game to talk about, while the others are each rushing to meet differing deadlines--but they all offer individual takes on what it takes to create an extension of one's self via video games.

Fish's story is the one that's dominated much of the media coverage, and with good reason. Fish comes off as a live wire pretty much from the moment he appears on screen. He is brutally self-effacing and incredibly anxious during this period, which was filmed about 18 months before Fez was finally released. He talks a great deal about his inspirations for the game, as well as the pressures he's found himself under after splitting with his former business partner (who is represented by a photo obscured by pixels through the entire film) and subsequent attempts to get him to sign off on an official split agreement that would allow him to show the game at PAX East.

Team Meat, on the other hand, are within sight of finishing Super Meat Boy when the film opens. We learn early on of the friendship that binds Edmund and Tommy together. Despite their bi-coastal working relationship--Edmund resides in Santa Cruz, California, while Tommy lives near his family in North Carolina--the two communicate daily, laboring dozens and dozens of hours each week to try and push Meat Boy into the stage of completion so that it can go up as part of an Xbox Live promotion in the fall of 2010. The promotion means additional marketing help that self-starters like themselves desperately need, but the game still has a lot of work to go.

Blow's role in the film is more instructional and introspective. He speaks of the development process of Braid, talking in plainspoken terms about what it meant to him to build a game he viewed as an extension of his own personality and ideas, which aren't necessarily spelled out for the player. He expresses his frustration with the fact that many players simply didn't understand the greater meanings he'd infused the game with, even acknowledging his slightly obsessive tendency to reply to nearly any commentary on the Internet that he believes misunderstands his vision.

Each of these stories contains enough intriguing information and personal drama to easily fill a 90-minute runtime, but it's the emotional elements of each story that make Indie Game: The Movie more than just a documentary about video games. Around the halfway point of the doc, Blow more or less drops out of the equation, and the directors hyper-focus on Meat Boy and Fez's big crunches. During these periods, we see these guys at their most threadbare. Edmund spends so many hours working on the game that he barely sees his wife, who often is literally sitting ten feet behind him. Tommy's only outside contact comes in brief family visits and occasional late night jaunts to a deserted local diner. Phil is an outright mess, tearing his hair out over his former business partner's either inability, or unwillingness to sign the contract that will let him show the game at PAX. In one particularly harrowing interview, Phil sits in his hotel lobby, speaking in hurried bursts of panic and rage at the prospect of coming all this way, only to be derailed by the lack of a single signature. As someone who has suffered from his own anxiety issues, I can see in this scene the makings of a full-blown panic attack occurring right in front of me. It's an uncomfortably familiar thing to watch.

Make no mistake: Indie Game: The Movie can be a very dark story. Phil at one point even confesses that he'd likely kill himself if Fez never made it to market (thankfully, it eventually did.) Whether that's viewed as pure hyperbole or a realistic threat probably depends on how well you know Phil, but from the outside, watching it on film, it felt painfully serious.

That darkness is something some game makers have taken umbrage with in regards to the film. Papo & Yo creator Vander Caballero expressed some concern over the dour tone of the film to Penny Arcade writer Ben Kuchera, saying, "'Oh, if my game doesn't work out I am over! I will kill myself!' No, make another game! Create! This is fun!" Similarly, veteran designer Derek Smart took to Twitter today to tell prospective watchers of the film to "note that not all of us devs are clueless pricks who complain all the time," while also championing Blow's commentary in the film.

While I see both Caballero and Smart's points, I don't necessarily agree that the film's portrayal of its subjects is that of chronic complainers who hate what they do. Yes, Phil and Tommy's expressions of frustration can come off like the rantings of extremely angry people, but they're angry because of situations that impede their progress on creating something they love. If anything, Indie Game: The Movie shows that developing a game is really fucking hard, and not the sort of thing that anyone can just do. That's an important perspective to show, given the current lack of knowledge much of the mainstream world has about our favorite entertainment medium.

And it's not as if there aren't triumphs to be shown. Though Blow seemingly considers his success with Braid something of a blessing and a curse, there's no question that he has the opportunity to work on his newest project mostly unencumbered by publisher meddling because he established himself with that game. When Phil finally breaks through and gets Fez shown, repeated issues with the preview build don't necessarily dampen the excitement he feels seeing people play and enjoy his labor of love. And as for Tommy and Edmund, there is perhaps no sweeter moment than seeing Edmund's wife, Danielle, break down into tears as she sees her husband's hard work pay off. This is a movie that shows both the agony and the ecstasy of game development. Maybe it leans a tad hard on the agony, but it's not as bad as some people might say.

And, of course, there are those who wonder why more perspectives weren't given. It's generally public knowledge that Pijot and Swirsky also filmed a good deal of footage with thatgamecompany's Jenova Chen, Passage designer Jason Rohrer, and Aquaria creators Alec Holowka and Derek Yu. That footage will appear on the special edition DVD and Blu-ray release, which the filmmakers say are still in production and "just need to be pressed," but didn't make it into the film because, quite frankly, it would have been just too much. In Indie Game: The Movie, Pijot and Swirsky narrow their focus to the three most compelling stories that came out of their 300 hours worth of footage, and it's better for that fact. A documentary has to have a tight, engaging narrative. Otherwise, it runs the risk of just turning into an instructional info dump. It's the same reason why it isn't just called Video Game: The Movie. While it might have been nice to get some perspective from those currently working in the more mainstream, big budget game space, it would have diluted the story at the film's core. The laser-like focus on those stories might not make Indie Game an all-encompassing view of the entire industry, but it does make it a genuinely great film.

I recommend Indie Game: The Movie for anyone who has even a passing interest in games, game development, or just the process of artistic creation in general. This is a universally watchable documentary, something the game industry has rarely had before, and desperately needs as the rest of the world becomes more and more aware of the medium. Does the film have its flaws? Certainly, but none of those flaws detract from the movie's central goal of capturing highly personal independent game development experiences, warts and all, and making them into a story anyone can appreciate.

Indie Game: The Movie is now available via iTunes, Steam, and as a DRM-free download from the film's official website. DVD and Blu-ray versions currently do not have a release date, but are in the works. Expect the movie to appear on Netflix and other streaming services sometime in the (hopefully) foreseeable future.

Alex Navarro on Google+
235 Comments
Posted by Alex

A man sits hunched over his keyboard. It's some ungodly hour of the morning, and he sits, staring at his computer screen. He subsists on a steady diet of soda and coffee, and appears not to have seen the sun in weeks. He has no social life, though this is largely of his own design. He doesn't have time for people, because he has a game to finish. The strings of code that dominate his computer monitor might as well be gibberish to most, but to the figure slumped in his office chair, it's the foundation of a video game, one that he is furiously trying to finish in order to complete it by an important marketing deadline.

This is an image that's probably all too familiar for those of us who count ourselves as enthusiasts of the video game industry. We at least have some idea of what it takes to make a game, independent or otherwise. But to those who are only tangentially familiar with what goes into these trifling digital entertainments of ours, it's a striking image. The idea of suffering for one's art is hardly anything new, but to those who don't necessarily consider video games to be art, it's an unfamiliar experience to see someone putting so much of their heart and soul into games where sentient meat sacks dodge giant saw blades and fight evil cybernetic babies with top hats and monocles.

This is what makes Indie Game: The Movie, the recently-toured documentary from Canadian filmmakers Lisanne Pijot and James Swirsky, so great and, frankly, important. There aren't very many documentaries about video games in general, a point that James and Lisanne echoed both during a Q&A at a New York City screening I attended, and in a Skype conversation I had with them yesterday. More to the point, there are even fewer documentaries about video games that are able to put the experience of game development in relatable terms to those who don't necessarily have more than a passing interest in gaming. Indie Game: The Movie does exactly that. It shows the pains and struggles of people trying to create something they're passionate about creating. It doesn't matter if they're making a video game or a film or an erotic cake. What they're making means something to these people, and by proxy of the talented filmmakers, what they're making means something to us, too.

Those of you who spend a lot of time perusing video game sites probably already have an idea of the stories contained within Indie Game: The Movie, but for those who aren't aware, a brief refresher. The film follows the development and post-development experiences of three different game makers: Fez creator Phil Fish, Team Meat members Edmund McMillen and Tommy Refenes, and enigmatic Braid designer Jonathan Blow. The three stories are varied in scope and stress--Blow, for instance, has no new game to talk about, while the others are each rushing to meet differing deadlines--but they all offer individual takes on what it takes to create an extension of one's self via video games.

Fish's story is the one that's dominated much of the media coverage, and with good reason. Fish comes off as a live wire pretty much from the moment he appears on screen. He is brutally self-effacing and incredibly anxious during this period, which was filmed about 18 months before Fez was finally released. He talks a great deal about his inspirations for the game, as well as the pressures he's found himself under after splitting with his former business partner (who is represented by a photo obscured by pixels through the entire film) and subsequent attempts to get him to sign off on an official split agreement that would allow him to show the game at PAX East.

Team Meat, on the other hand, are within sight of finishing Super Meat Boy when the film opens. We learn early on of the friendship that binds Edmund and Tommy together. Despite their bi-coastal working relationship--Edmund resides in Santa Cruz, California, while Tommy lives near his family in North Carolina--the two communicate daily, laboring dozens and dozens of hours each week to try and push Meat Boy into the stage of completion so that it can go up as part of an Xbox Live promotion in the fall of 2010. The promotion means additional marketing help that self-starters like themselves desperately need, but the game still has a lot of work to go.

Blow's role in the film is more instructional and introspective. He speaks of the development process of Braid, talking in plainspoken terms about what it meant to him to build a game he viewed as an extension of his own personality and ideas, which aren't necessarily spelled out for the player. He expresses his frustration with the fact that many players simply didn't understand the greater meanings he'd infused the game with, even acknowledging his slightly obsessive tendency to reply to nearly any commentary on the Internet that he believes misunderstands his vision.

Each of these stories contains enough intriguing information and personal drama to easily fill a 90-minute runtime, but it's the emotional elements of each story that make Indie Game: The Movie more than just a documentary about video games. Around the halfway point of the doc, Blow more or less drops out of the equation, and the directors hyper-focus on Meat Boy and Fez's big crunches. During these periods, we see these guys at their most threadbare. Edmund spends so many hours working on the game that he barely sees his wife, who often is literally sitting ten feet behind him. Tommy's only outside contact comes in brief family visits and occasional late night jaunts to a deserted local diner. Phil is an outright mess, tearing his hair out over his former business partner's either inability, or unwillingness to sign the contract that will let him show the game at PAX. In one particularly harrowing interview, Phil sits in his hotel lobby, speaking in hurried bursts of panic and rage at the prospect of coming all this way, only to be derailed by the lack of a single signature. As someone who has suffered from his own anxiety issues, I can see in this scene the makings of a full-blown panic attack occurring right in front of me. It's an uncomfortably familiar thing to watch.

Make no mistake: Indie Game: The Movie can be a very dark story. Phil at one point even confesses that he'd likely kill himself if Fez never made it to market (thankfully, it eventually did.) Whether that's viewed as pure hyperbole or a realistic threat probably depends on how well you know Phil, but from the outside, watching it on film, it felt painfully serious.

That darkness is something some game makers have taken umbrage with in regards to the film. Papo & Yo creator Vander Caballero expressed some concern over the dour tone of the film to Penny Arcade writer Ben Kuchera, saying, "'Oh, if my game doesn't work out I am over! I will kill myself!' No, make another game! Create! This is fun!" Similarly, veteran designer Derek Smart took to Twitter today to tell prospective watchers of the film to "note that not all of us devs are clueless pricks who complain all the time," while also championing Blow's commentary in the film.

While I see both Caballero and Smart's points, I don't necessarily agree that the film's portrayal of its subjects is that of chronic complainers who hate what they do. Yes, Phil and Tommy's expressions of frustration can come off like the rantings of extremely angry people, but they're angry because of situations that impede their progress on creating something they love. If anything, Indie Game: The Movie shows that developing a game is really fucking hard, and not the sort of thing that anyone can just do. That's an important perspective to show, given the current lack of knowledge much of the mainstream world has about our favorite entertainment medium.

And it's not as if there aren't triumphs to be shown. Though Blow seemingly considers his success with Braid something of a blessing and a curse, there's no question that he has the opportunity to work on his newest project mostly unencumbered by publisher meddling because he established himself with that game. When Phil finally breaks through and gets Fez shown, repeated issues with the preview build don't necessarily dampen the excitement he feels seeing people play and enjoy his labor of love. And as for Tommy and Edmund, there is perhaps no sweeter moment than seeing Edmund's wife, Danielle, break down into tears as she sees her husband's hard work pay off. This is a movie that shows both the agony and the ecstasy of game development. Maybe it leans a tad hard on the agony, but it's not as bad as some people might say.

And, of course, there are those who wonder why more perspectives weren't given. It's generally public knowledge that Pijot and Swirsky also filmed a good deal of footage with thatgamecompany's Jenova Chen, Passage designer Jason Rohrer, and Aquaria creators Alec Holowka and Derek Yu. That footage will appear on the special edition DVD and Blu-ray release, which the filmmakers say are still in production and "just need to be pressed," but didn't make it into the film because, quite frankly, it would have been just too much. In Indie Game: The Movie, Pijot and Swirsky narrow their focus to the three most compelling stories that came out of their 300 hours worth of footage, and it's better for that fact. A documentary has to have a tight, engaging narrative. Otherwise, it runs the risk of just turning into an instructional info dump. It's the same reason why it isn't just called Video Game: The Movie. While it might have been nice to get some perspective from those currently working in the more mainstream, big budget game space, it would have diluted the story at the film's core. The laser-like focus on those stories might not make Indie Game an all-encompassing view of the entire industry, but it does make it a genuinely great film.

I recommend Indie Game: The Movie for anyone who has even a passing interest in games, game development, or just the process of artistic creation in general. This is a universally watchable documentary, something the game industry has rarely had before, and desperately needs as the rest of the world becomes more and more aware of the medium. Does the film have its flaws? Certainly, but none of those flaws detract from the movie's central goal of capturing highly personal independent game development experiences, warts and all, and making them into a story anyone can appreciate.

Indie Game: The Movie is now available via iTunes, Steam, and as a DRM-free download from the film's official website. DVD and Blu-ray versions currently do not have a release date, but are in the works. Expect the movie to appear on Netflix and other streaming services sometime in the (hopefully) foreseeable future.

Staff
Posted by liste3r_fi3nd

ANyone seen this yet?

Posted by Gunslinger0130

Nope, really want to though, looks incredibly interesting.

Posted by VoshiNova

I cant wait to see this movie, the trailer alone was pretty moving

Posted by mbkish

I own it from being part of the kickstarter but I won't be able to watch it for a few days.

Posted by csl316

Can't wait to finally see it.

Online
Posted by Video_Game_King
Posted by aurahack

Fun fact: the Super Meat Boy fan art featured in the movie is mine. :)

The movie is terrific. I'm excited to get to watch it again. The screening I saw in Montreal was amazing.

Posted by TEKUMS

@liste3r_fi3nd: I saw it a few weeks ago when they were doing a Canada wide showing and Q&A. There were some technical hiccups ( they were streaming it over satellite to the movie theater and it was a stormy day out) but other than that it was amazing. I can't wait to get home and download my copy of it and watch it again!

Posted by Chippy180

Can't wait to finally watch this! To any Steam duders having trouble getting it(Or not having the option at all), restart Steam. The "Install" option will be available.

Posted by ReddenBlack

When I try to buy the digital copy, it keeps saying "email does not match confirmation" anyone else having this problem?

Posted by mrfluke

done went ahead and bought a copy of that movie, alex is right we need more documentaries like this,

bought it mostly to see the team meat and braid pieces, and to support the people that filmed this documentary

call me ignorant, call me a prick, but i cannot sympathize with phil fish after his slip up, i dont care if your game is the best in the world, you dont go an insult other game creators work. no matter how much it sucks or not,

Posted by Coafi

It looks really interesting.

@aurahack: That's awesome!

Posted by Little_Socrates

@aurahack said:

Fun fact: the Super Meat Boy fan art featured in the movie is mine. :)

The movie is terrific. I'm excited to get to watch it again. The screening I saw in Montreal was amazing.

I actively cooed at reading that. It was such a sweet moment.

@liste3r_fi3nd: This movie is wonderful. I caught it last month with a group of friends. Ed McMillen gets the short shrift in this review, but maybe that's for the best. Catch the movie.

Posted by dvorak

Is it just me, or does 300 hours not sound like that much footage with respect to how many subjects they followed around? Especially considering how long term this project was.

Posted by Alex

@Little_Socrates: I didn't want to give too much away regarding any of the individual plotlines or statements, but yeah, Ed's story I thought was the sweetest and most heartfelt of them all.

Staff
Edited by Grok1122

Yes I saw it in Boston. I echo Alex's thoughts. I went in with reserved expectations. I knew I was going to see a kickstarted documentary about video games, and that it might not be very good but I might enjoy the content. I walked away having my expectations blown away and realizing that this is one of the best documentaries I've seen in years.

Posted by TinyGrenade

Amazing write up Alex, this was really awesome. Glad to hear everyone is portrayed in such a realistic light, makes me feel very comfortable about the movie being open to everyone. Hopefully it'll shed some light on the unknowing and entertain us fans.

Posted by EpicSteve

I don't have Internet capable of streaming and there's no DVD to order!? Bummer.

Posted by Gildermershina

Sunny O))) shirt alert! Woo!

Posted by Bollard

I might have to get this off Steam. I swear it's been on there for ages? Or was that just pre-order?

Posted by GeneralZod37

Saw the first screening in Seattle, and I left just wanting more. Such a great flick. Brad's cameo is a great part of the movie as well.

Edited by HydraHam

I will defiantly rent this later on itunes but i am not expecting a whole lot.

There is far too much hype around the gaming community for it which leads me to believe it will end up mediocre, just like the donkey kong documentary that i really did not enjoy.

Posted by InternetDetective

Saw this at the LA screening a while back. It is good. You guys may hate Phil Fish but he makes a good documentary subject.

Online
Edited by CornBREDX

I am actually really excited to see this. I just hope it takes less artistic license with the footage then King of Kong infamously did (a lot of indy film makers were angry about that Film).

Even though I know what to expect, I'm actually really interested to see this. I think it will be interesting. (I said interesting to much just now : / )

I think developers commenting on this film with perceived negativity are just worried its casting a dour light on the video game making process and aren't taking into account that even if you love your job and put your heart and soul into it- it's not always easy and it's definitely not always fun. The turmoil makes the payoff so much better, though.

I don't know- just a guess.

Posted by Mason_M

Man Alex, you're really good at breaking down movies; you should write for a movie website or something.

But seriously, awesome write up. I've been meaning to see this for a while: glad to know it's available.

Posted by superscott597

@liste3r_fi3nd: I saw a screening about a month ago. It was fantastic. Very moving and an awesome look into the creation of some of the best indie games available. It was cool to see the lead up to the release of Fez as well, because it was still in development by the time the filming ended.

Posted by project343

Everyone should support this--the fact that it's an incredible documentary notwithstanding.

Posted by frythefly

Another great documentary on games. Ft. Jason Rohrer and Chris Crawford.

A documentary has to have a tight, engaging narrative. Otherwise, it runs the risk of just turning into an instructional info dump.

Nope.

Edited by GaspoweR

@Mason_M said:

Man Alex, you're really good at breaking down movies; you should write for a movie website or something.

That comment just made me miss Rorie and Screened. That site is now merely a shadow of its former self. The one doing the What to Watch feature does a horrible job making descriptions and some of the reviews are pretty...hit or miss and I don't like the writing style AT ALL.

Posted by PXAbstraction

Awesome review Alex. I wrote a shorter one on my own blog with similar points but you articulated them much better than I did. I was a Kickstarter backer for this and saw it at a screening here in Ottawa and had all my expectations surpassed. My only wish is that the film could have been longer and told more of the stories but I'm apparently getting a Blu-ray from the KS tier so I'm stoked to see the extra footage.

I agree with your response to comments made by Smart and others who are saying the film's message is being sensationalised. As someone who follows Smart's Twitter feed and his past online antics, I will say that he comes off as just a wee bit hypocritical telling other creators not to bitch so much. I'm sure Team Meat and Phil Fish are super happy now that their games have come out but I think they would also say that if you're not stressed and under pressure when you're making an indie game, you're doing it wrong.

I hate anything that uses the reality TV method of artificially trumping up drama where there really isn't any and I can smell that treatment a mile away. This didn't feel like that at all and it really felt like they were just telling a story as it happened rather than using creative editing to make the narrative into what they wanted. They made a documentary that was actually a documentary!

The film can be had for only $10 and I strongly recommend anyone check it out. It's an incredible effort from two first-time filmmakers and like Alex said, anyone with even a passing interest in this medium should see it. Don't pirate it, pay for it, these guys deserve it!

Posted by Seedofpower

I saw this movie at SXSW. It was pretty good. When I was done watching it, I thought Phil Fish was a very frustrated man who needs to learn to keep his mouth shut.

Posted by DoctorWelch

They should let us buy that 300 hours of footage uncut and straight up, I'd fucking watch it all.

Posted by CharlesAlanRatliff

I downloaded this movie today via the preorder I got when I backed it on Kickstarter a year ago (my name's in the credits!). Can't wait to watch it later tonight. Also got the soundtrack with it.

Posted by Enai

Nice work Alex, I watched this earlier today. Awesome film.

I love documentaries and there none that I know of that cover the industry and game development, let alone indie development, in such a light. The best I could usually watch is behind the scenes stuff that are packed into collectors editions of games, and none that I've seen have shown me such an insight into the industry like 'Indie Game' did.

This documentary isn't just a fascinating insight into game development, but it also touches a very human level. Definitely worth a watch, I just wish it was longer.

Edited by Sooty

Wow that bottom picture is so Hipster it should be illegal.

Posted by tsiro

This movie is so good. I caught it while they were on tour, and loved every minute. Can't wait for force my family to watch it tonight! If you haven't seen it yet, I cannot recommend it enough.

Posted by dr_mantas

The Jonathan Blow parts seem most interesting to me, partly because he appeals to me the most with his ideas about game development.

Posted by SuperJew

My 1080p download just finished. Cannot wait to watch it again. Lisanne and James are from my hometown, Winnipeg. I watched a screening of it as part of the Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival. http://www.hotdocs.ca/. The filmmakers hosted a Q&A via satelite afterwards from Toronto, I believe.

This movie is fantastic. It has such a good vibe, eventhough sometimes they are showing the dark side of independent game development. It really shows what is going on behind the scenes of some of your favorite games. It made me appreciate these games that much more. I'm eager to get my wife's take on this, since she is a documentary fan, but not a video game fan.

Posted by leebmx

Good write up Alex, really miss the stuff you used to write over at screened. Look forward to watching this. Still confused about why I should hate Phil Fish.

Posted by Chet_Rippo

Saw this at an indie theater a few months back while they were on tour. It's REALLY good, definitely worth buying.

Edited by DharmaBum

Just watched this today, it does an excellent job at portraying gaming culture and introducing it to those who might not be familiar at all. Great cinematography that really elevates the subject matter. Several cool Giant Bomb cameos too!

Edited by RobinOttens

Oh wow, a movie review from Alex. I missed those. Makes me think, it'd be great if This Ain't No Game returned, featuring mr. Navarro.
 
I loved the documentary. Would've liked to see more Jonathan Blow, but the other three devs are great to watch too. They've found the perfect balance between in-depth game design talk and more personal stories about people and stuff. And now I can say I've got my name in the credits of a feature-length award winning documentary. Thank you kickstarter.

Posted by ionkinetic

First thing I finished on Steam in a long time, it was good. No achievements thou.

Posted by CameraGuyKurt

@Lebensbaum: 2 Player Productions had nothing to do with Indie Game: The Movie. The company that James and Lisanne created is called "Blinkworks".

Posted by MarkWahlberg

I actually just finished Braid for the first time a couple days ago (yay humblebundle!), interested to see what Blow has to say.

Posted by Artie

Caught this movie in an independent theater (imagine that). It was really good. I thought both Blow and Fish were incredibly interesting to listen to. Blow's contributions are what gives it all meaning, there's a quote from him that ties the whole thing together, it's repeated at the end of the movie. Really great stuff.

I'm probably going to end up buying it on Steam just so I can watch it forever (BTW -- it's on steam)

Posted by algertman

@Sooty said:

Wow that bottom picture is so Hipster it should be illegal.

That's the entire documentary. A bunch of elitist hipsters.

Edited by Helios1337

Can't watch it, PCs are only for spreadsheets apparently. Joking aside, good movie!

Posted by Vegetable_Side_Dish

Is it possible for pictures of pretentious people to also be pretentious? Maybe I'm just projecting.