Giant Bomb News

141 Comments

Ouya Finally Responds to Free the Games Criticism, Upsets Everyone

Founder Julie Uhrman's blog post has caused developers to speak loudly about their dissatisfaction.

Ouya is “surprised” at the response to its Free the Games promotion, founder Julie Uhrman wrote in a blog post yesterday.

“This response surprised us--we thought this was going to be great--how could it not be?” said Uhrman. “We launched the Free the Games Fund to find great games from the very platform that gave us life.”

Pulling from a million dollar pool, the Free the Games promotion promised financial backing to Kickstarter games if they were Ouya exclusive for six months (afterwards, they could go wherever). If the Kickstarter projects raised at least $50,000, Ouya would match that, and that financial matching would continue as high as $250,000. An additional $100,000 was promised to the project that raised the most money during this program.

So far, two of the projects have been embroiled in speculation about their funding efforts, with Elementary, My Dear Holmes being straight-up shut down by Kickstarter late last week. Both have been dealing with accusations of friends and family pumping in funds to hit Ouya’s target.

“We wanted to get on top of this and did not want anything to do with any of what was happening as it was an extremely negative campaign for us” wrote Elementary creator Sam Chandola. “Strong personal accusations were going up against us, and it was a huge drain on our time, energy and resources. We had been hoping that the suspicious accounts would have been suspended so that we could keep on going strong and without controversy, but instead it was the project that got so. We are, naturally, deeply saddened by this. But if this is what it takes to put an end to the negativity, so be it.”

Gridiron Thunder, a project that has since closed with $171,009 in funding prior to what Ouya kicks in, faced similar criticisms as Elementary. According to Kicktraq, the average backer pledge was $934, well outside the norm. In Gridiron Thunder’s case, the developer, MogoTXT, didn’t deny friends, family, and supporters from its Silicon Valley roots had pledged big. Many of these pledges came from brand-new accounts that hadn’t supported anything on Kickstarter before. Furthermore, MogoTXT was promising to release the game in September (this month!), raising questions about what a project clearly in the final stretch needs with a program that, in spirit, was designed to help scrappy upstarts. But it hit the goal, so Ouya will have to back it.

When I originally asked developers about Free the Games, many were skeptical of Ouya’s approach.

“I mean hey,” said Dan Marshall, creator of Ben There, Dan That! and the recent Gun Monkeys, “if you've got a million bucks to blow, take it to some indie devs you admire, and whose style of games you desperately want on your system and say ‘Here! Look! Here's $100k, make something spectacular for us that'll make our system a must-have.’ THAT would be a tactic I'd respect them for. Six months exclusivity on a hundred games that'll be out on Steam eventually doesn't feel like a particularly wise way to spend that money and get systems selling, I'm afraid.”

The blog post contains only vague references to the conversation around the Free the Games program.

“In launching this campaign, we’ve been called everything from naive and foolish to crazy and idealistic,” she said. “This is not the first time we’ve been called any of that. Maybe we’re naive…and YES we’re definitely idealistic. It’s gotten us this far. We believe (still) that great games from great developers can be discovered this way--by you. If we can put aside the doubt and embrace the spirit of this fund as it is meant, and of OUYA as it is meant, we might just be surprised by what a little positivity can produce.”

Developer Sophie Houlden is pulling down her game, Rose and Time, due to Ouya's blog post and other recent missteps.

Asking people to stop being jerks is, perhaps, not the best way to inspire developer confidence. This becomes clear in the comments section, in which several well-known developers weigh in with their own problems with Ouya, and Uhrman’s decision to seemingly ignore the underlying issues with the Free the Games deal.

“This post makes me sad, for a lot of reasons to be honest, but mainly for the wording,” said Mike Bithell, developer of Thomas Was Alone and the upcoming Volume. “This isn't an acceptance of criticism, or an explanation of how clearly dodgy as hell schemes are being supported by you publicly (in PR at least, I really hope you weasel out before giving the Gridiron Thunder guys a penny). This reads like a press release from a console company locked into a foolish policy and using aspirational language to shift the blame, weirdly, onto its critics.”

Bithell was not alone.

“I said the Gridiron thing was the final straw but in reality this blog post was,” said Richard Perrin, developer of Kairo and the upcoming Journal. “We've all been waiting for how you guys were going to deal with this and your response is to post a blog entry that ducks and doges around the one central issue. We've all been watching very concerned, and you've basically made it clear you're either not listening or are not willing to engage with us. That being the case I can't work with you guys and I won't work with you guys. Thankfully we seem to be in a new era with game development where companies like Sony are taking the time to engage with smaller developers and are willing to admit mistakes and try to make things better. That your small plucky start up is coming across more impersonal and corporate than Sony should worry you deeply.”

"I know what honesty looks like, I know what dealing with problems looks like, and I sure as shit know what putting developers first should look like, and this isn’t it.”

Ouch.

In the case of Sophie Houlden, developer of Rose and Time, she’s actually pulling the game down from Ouya’s store.

“A real indie has more faces than just ‘look at how well things are going for me,’ we have to deal with all kinds of problems and we respond when people come to us with them,” said Houlden. “Responses like the one I read last night (weeks after the problem became apparent) feel entirely empty and dishonest to me. I know what honesty looks like, I know what dealing with problems looks like, and I sure as shit know what putting developers first should look like, and this isn’t it.”

Patrick Klepek on Google+
150 Comments
  • 150 results
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
Posted by mrsmiley

I really enjoy my OUYA. It has some great group games that let you use smartphones as controllers (one has up to 8 players!). XBMC is awesome, and the OUYA works great as emulator so I don't have to constantly hook up my old consoles when I want to play classic games. Doesn't get as much use as my normal consoles, but that's not what it's designed for. I constantly smile at all the people spitting shit on the the OUYA without ever having touched one. The internet sure loves to hate things they don't understand. Granted, I think this Kickstarter contest idea is horrible, but the people talking about how the OUYA is a "failed" console make me laugh.

Posted by GalacticPunt

You want to really see some shit, it's very possible someone's going to find proof that it was OUYA who was making AstroTurf contributions to "Elementary." And have acted oblivious when it was announced that Kickstarter shut it down, throwing the developer under the bus. Chandola has been alluding to that but can't make that accusation openly.

If OUYA people did that, and are as terrible at covering their tracks as they are at most things, it is going to be a legal/PR apocalypse.

Online
Posted by DonPixel

Having personally meet the head of Elementary Dear Holmes while working in Vancouver, really not a surprise here...

Anyway... I'm happy I have not a Kickstarter account yet, and most likely never will.

Posted by Flappy

@originalyellow: Even if that may be the case, I still laugh at the in-depth conversations that those handful of people had. It's nice to have hope, but c'mon...

Edited by Acornactivist

I feel like I'm missing something here. Why are developers getting so angry with Ouya over this, rather than (just) the developers allegedly gaming the system? Is it because they saw it as Ouya enabling them to do so?

I agree, it's not the best laid plan, but it's also far from the worst, at least from a developer perspective. I definitely see reason for concern, and even lack of faith in the platform (there's plenty of that to go around), but I feel like the responses here seemed a but extreme, and overly focused on Ouya's fault.

Can someone help me figure this out?

Posted by Marcsman

Oi vey for Ouya

Edited by Ravenlight

@circlenine said:

I think I've gotten more entertainment reading about the Ouya's (and its managements) failings more than most people who've actually bought Ouyas.

Sadly, I've got to agree.

@donpixel said:

Anyway... I'm happy I have not a Kickstarter account yet, and most likely never will.

That's a weird thing to say. It's not Kickstarter's fault that the Ouya turned into such a shitshow. There are plenty of legitimate projects on Kickstarter worth a look.

Posted by Fram

"Bithell was not alone."

Jesus Patrick, I almost did a spit-take at that line

OMG

Posted by RedRocketWestie

I still think these Android (or whatever) mini consoles that are focused around indie games and homebrew are a good idea that could find a niche to thrive in. They'll never be mainstream but I don't think that's what they should aim for. However, the people running Ouya really don't seem to understand how to work with indie developers or what makes the indie community different from the "mainstream." They're acting extremely corporate, putting the gross PR varnish over all the many problems this system has had, despite funding this thing through Kickstarter which you would think, would have taught them how to interact with the types of communities that consume this stuff. I really think they need to re-think how they message and present themselves if they want to get taken seriously. 2013 really seems to be quickly becoming the Year of Flubbed PR.

They present an image of wanting to be the plucky underdog, but their actions seem more in line with a company chasing the validation and legitimacy of the big companies. They were trying to sell the Ouya in brick-and-mortar stores, for goodness' sake! It's like they don't understand (or care) who their market is, and are only using early adopters as a stepping stone to "show the big guys" that they can compete.

There's room for a console like the Ouya to succeed, but it's not where they're trying to force it to fit currently.

Posted by Itwongo

And my one other friend who had heard of the Ouya laughed when I said the Ouya would fail. He got blinded by hype.

Edited by Coolarman

If i had a hundred dollars to spend i would rather buy the new Vita TV (provided it comes out in North America) then the Ouya.

I love how Ouya is giving this lip service of how they are so open to indie developers and that they love indies yet they haven't really attracted some of the big name indies out there. Whereas Sony not only has been saying that and backing it up by attracting the big name indies to their platform.

Granted Sony is a much larger company than Ouya. But Ouya has not made the case to indies as to why they need to be on their platform. This "free the games" campaign I guess was their attempt to shell out money to get indies on their platform but they still haven't made a compelling reason to be on their platform.

Posted by darukaru

What is the endgame for Ouya here? It certainly isn't to run a functional company. It isn't to sell software, since the average Ouya store title is several grades below iOS App Store filler. It isn't to ship product, either, since many backers still haven't received their devices.

The company itself is chronically mismanaged and out of touch. I can only assume at this point that they're looking to get their brand out there as much as possible with publicity stunt after publicity stunt until some larger, more competent manufacturer buys them and everyone gets a big payday. It is a company run by a marketing executive; of course the plastic smiley face is never going to come off.

Posted by Brodehouse

@coolarman: You also have to remember that the Ouya Kickstarter launched way before Sony amped up their indie promises, and it may in fact be that Sony made that a priority after they saw the money the Ouya received. When the Ouya Kickstarter launched, it _was_ the best/easiest way for indie devs to get their games playable on televisions. It's just that in the time since, Adam Boyes pulled the rug from under them and ate their lunch. And drank their rum.

Posted by metalsnakezero

As much as people don't want to hear about this Ouya stuff again, it is important to hear about it since it is a new thing in the industry and helps us understand what is going wrong and is there a possible way of doing it right.

Still I wonder what the team was thinking when they put up their idea on Kickstarter about a console with free games and pray that people would pay for stuff.

Posted by EpicVandal

@fwpx said:

Ouyouch.

Brilliant.

Edited by GalacticGravy

...y'know...forget it. I posted some big thing but, honestly, I don't care.

Posted by MonkeyKing1969

I think as OUYA has seen backing Kick starters with more money, just doesn't work. But, is it their fault that thieves and shysters got around the rules so fast? Yes, OUYA should just fully fund some games and untie themselves form this KS stuff maze of removing fact form fiction, but I think blaming them for not funding very sketchy KS is a bit much.

OUYA was never really destine to work as a fully supported & functional console. It as not pitched on KS at first to be one in reality, if you look at teh original pitch on day one of the KS they goals were small. It was meant to be a tinkerers toy that might get 3,000 backers, it was meant to be an open platform to play with with by people who wanted something with more power than a Raspberry pi. But with 60K backers it was forced to turn into something else, something consumer level and there just was not the time, money, resources, ....or business plan to do that. So, yes I blame the backers as much as I blame OUYA for the trubles taht occured. If you join a mob, expect mob like results.

Posted by cooljammer00

So what's the main problem here, exactly? Why does anyone care how OUYA is spending/wasting their money on funding fraudulent titles? These people who pulled their own games off the OUYA marketplace, does that make their game any more or less popular by comparison?

I'm not saying I disagree with their decision to have integrity and to "never work with OUYA again", but I just don't see why you would deny yourself the sales of your indie game when this stuff sorta doesn't affect you. Unless the Free the Games funds are being taken out of your hand and given to someone else, there will always be haves and havenots. These other games are being funded by rich people which in turn gets their funds doubled by even more rich people. The only gatekeepers here seem to be Kickstarter themselves, keeping the Sherlock game from being funded due to funny business that the developers seem either unwilling or unable to refute.

Posted by enemymouse

The more you give me, the more I ouya.

Posted by McGhee

I don't really see what all the fuss is about here. Why should I care if a project gets backing from friends and family? And what does that have to do with Ouya anyway? What's wrong with them offering money to developers for six months exclusivity? All of that aside, the Ouya looks like shit.

Posted by Irvandus

Excellent read.

Posted by OurSin_360

I don't see the problem? So what if friends and family add to the kickstarter, is that illegal? Even if they fluff the numbers in their favor with ghost accounts etc, ouya is still only paying for exclusive rights for 6 months so I don't see how any of it is a fault on ouya's end?

If anything is at fault wouldn't it be kick starter itself then? Ouya just tried to help themselves out and help out developers at the same time. Maybe it's not working out as planned with unforeseen issues with how kickstarter allows funding, but it seemed a pretty legit and well meaning idea to me. And at the end of the day if mom wants to drop 100grand on my kickstarter i'm not going to say no, and probably nobody else is either lol.

Edited by Xristophoros

The Ouya was a fundamental mistake from day one. Surely they would have known that it would only appeal to a very small minority. Right? With the exception of a couple exclusives, it brings nothing to the table and gives no reason for people whatsoever to re-purchase games which they already own on their tablets and phones. The fact Amazon is making their own Andorid gaming console after the fact is beyond idiotic.

Edited by Brodehouse

I don't see the problem? So what if friends and family add to the kickstarter, is that illegal? Even if they fluff the numbers in their favor with ghost accounts etc, ouya is still only paying for exclusive rights for 6 months so I don't see how any of it is a fault on ouya's end?

It goes like this.

I start a 'Free the Games' Kickstarter.

I put 250k into it myself.

Ouya puts 250k into it, as per the contract.

The Kickstarter ends and I take my 250k back.

I use the 250k Ouya gave me to build a game.

I finish the game.

I release the completed game onto their stores.

It has 0 demand because 0 people wanted it.

Ouya just paid 250k for something no one wanted.

-----

The Kickstarter matching pledge wasn't there just to secure exclusivity of a game, it's to secure exclusivity of a game the market wants. The 250k number was a threshold they wanted met as a signifier of demand. Ouya gains absolutely nothing by paying for the production of games the market does not want.

Edited by Sooty

There is no reason for the Ouya to continue existing the moment the PS Vita TV becomes available.

@mrsmiley said:

but the people talking about how the OUYA is a "failed" console make me laugh.

The people in denial are funnier. You think the Ouya isn't a failed console because you can stream media to it (what console can't?) and can use emulators to play old games from other consoles? Well, that makes sense.

It isn't even a good purchase as a media box anymore as stuff like this has hit the market: http://www.ebuyer.com/274064-cyclone-micro-2-mkv-player-cyclone-micro-2-player

Posted by Xeiphyer

Ouya? Ouno!

Posted by melodiousj

I come not to defend the Ouya, but for simple clarification. Why are developers so mad about this?

I'd be more inclined to side with the devs if I had a clearer understanding of what the problem is, but I just don't. I'm not seeing the bigger picture here, and I wish I was.

Edited by Draxyle

I'm still confused by the direction they're trying to take this console. I thought this was supposed to be just be a box that let you play Android games on a TV; not a new console trying to compete against every other console on the market.

Edited by zyba27

ouya is a good console it's just the software of the console is a little bad linux distro like some games crash and take you back to the menu stuff like that the hardware is nice but the software and the lack of knowledge this team has about most thing's could be the death blow if an ouya 2 comes id be fucking amazed at this point

Posted by melodiousj

@oursin_360 said:

I don't see the problem? So what if friends and family add to the kickstarter, is that illegal? Even if they fluff the numbers in their favor with ghost accounts etc, ouya is still only paying for exclusive rights for 6 months so I don't see how any of it is a fault on ouya's end?

It goes like this.

I start a 'Free the Games' Kickstarter.

I put 250k into it myself.

Ouya puts 250k into it, as per the contract.

The Kickstarter ends and I take my 250k back.

I use the 250k Ouya gave me to build a game.

I finish the game.

I release the completed game onto their stores.

It has 0 demand because 0 people wanted it.

Ouya just paid 250k for something no one wanted.

-----

The Kickstarter matching pledge wasn't there just to secure exclusivity of a game, it's to secure exclusivity of a game the market wants. The 250k number was a threshold they wanted met as a signifier of demand. Ouya gains absolutely nothing by paying for the production of games the market does not want.

Okay, now I get it. Thank you for breaking this down for me.

Edited by Sooty

@zyba27 said:

ouya is a good console it's just the software of the console is a little bad linux distro like some games crash and take you back to the menu stuff like that the hardware is nice but the software and the lack of knowledge this team has about most thing's could be the death blow if an ouya 2 comes id be fucking amazed at this point

The hardware is only nice if you consider the insides of a year and a half old smartphone acceptable for a console.

Posted by l4wd0g

This is why it had to be kickstarted. No venture capitalist would be caught dead investing their money, there wasn't a market.

Edited by ProfessorEss

Sadly, indie complaining has become the whitest of industry white noise.

Good luck Sony. I can't help but envision your head on the chopping block in about a year or so when the indies flock to your platform, get comfortable, reap the benefits and then inevitably decide what you're doing also isn't good enough.

(PS: The title should've read "upsets indies" as opposed to "upsets everyone" as that is two completely different things.)

Edited by Brodehouse

@sooty said:
The people in denial are funnier. You think the Ouya isn't a failed console because you can stream media to it (what console can't?) and can use emulators to play old games from other consoles? Well, that makes sense.

The 360 and PS3 do not play .mkvs. The files I want to watch are .mkvs. Should I just wish hard enough at my PS3 until it plays them? Should I spend my time reconverting my files or should I press two buttons and watch it on an Ouya?

You apparently don't like emulators. Some people do. Do you believe your valuation is applicable for everyone else?

Your link is a decent solution for my problem, except that I might want a solution with a little bit more market penetration, so I know software devs will keep it better updated. It's why I buy iPhones instead of Android. I'm sure I'll need something new in 3-4 years anyway when there's some new file format that makes .mkvs look like .movs.

Edited by TOXICSHLOCK

OUYA is good for two very specific things at a reduced price, if interested. Older game emulation - being able to sideload MAME emu's on it from android. This opens a lot in that old school gaming arena on the cheap. For media streaming - XBMC is also well done on this platform with native HDMI at a low price point. Both of these things can be had on many platforms but harder to implement from scratch at a $99 price point. When compared side to side a well armed Rasberry PI is going to cost you more (after shipping and HDMI additions) and arguable run much slower without a uniform implementation than a stock OUYA. For these few reasons it has been pretty cool, II guess I am getting what I intended from it. If I was taking into stock its own direct games and implementation of its published games - I can understand the frustration easily. I would not recommend to anyone that this is a sound, relevant new gaming platform, its a very decent lil MAME, SNES, NES, XBMC media player at an all in one price point that's hard to match; with HDMI in such a small form factor. One of the more cleaver things I have seen with it is someone pulling the MB and mounting it to the inside of a arcade fight stick, sort of a arcade in a joystick ready to go. Bending it to your specific use outside its intended is where this thing is interesting.

Posted by believer258

@sooty said:

There is no reason for the Ouya to continue existing the moment the PS Vita TV becomes available.

@mrsmiley said:

but the people talking about how the OUYA is a "failed" console make me laugh.

The people in denial are funnier. You think the Ouya isn't a failed console because you can stream media to it (what console can't?) and can use emulators to play old games from other consoles? Well, that makes sense.

It isn't even a good purchase as a media box anymore as stuff like this has hit the market: http://www.ebuyer.com/274064-cyclone-micro-2-mkv-player-cyclone-micro-2-player

There was no reason for the Ouya to exist... ever, really. Everything it does, I can do with my modified original Xbox and better. Anyone without the know-how or the interest in softmodding an original Xbox to emulate games and stream media can just plug a laptop and a 360 controller into a TV and get the same thing. Even a softmodded PSP is pretty much a portable version of the Ouya and still does everything better than the Ouya. It even controls properly!

Posted by Corvak

Ouya's god awful shipping never delivered me my console when the other backers got theirs, so forgive my horrible cynicism.

But who in their right mind would adopt microsoft's dumb timed exclusive business model?

Edited by zeekthegeek

Julie Uhrman has got to be the most shallow, disingenuous executive in all of gaming. And that's really saying a lot in the world of Don Mattricks and Bobby Koticks. She never makes a statement that actually says ANYTHING of note, just buzzwords and playing the victim while avoiding any real issues.

Edited by Sooty

@brodehouse said:

@sooty said:
The people in denial are funnier. You think the Ouya isn't a failed console because you can stream media to it (what console can't?) and can use emulators to play old games from other consoles? Well, that makes sense.

The 360 and PS3 do not play .mkvs. The files I want to watch are .mkvs. Should I just wish hard enough at my PS3 until it plays them? Should I spend my time reconverting my files or should I press two buttons and watch it on an Ouya?

You apparently don't like emulators. Some people do. Do you believe your valuation is applicable for everyone else?

They do with a free, easy to use piece of software that has a home on Windows and OS X, well, the PS3 certainly does and it works great. Rather use that than an Ouya any day of the week. Look at TVersity or 'PS3 Media Server'. For local files only, then I guess you're SOL with those two consoles.

I have nothing against emulators. I don't consider "Oh but I can play emulators!" as a valid argument for backing up the Ouya not being a failed console, if you are arguing it's not a failure because you can play games from other consoles illegally then you're clutching at straws. (and I use illegally loosely because I emulate myself and give no shits)

Posted by wumbo3000

Maybe I'm not understanding this entire thing correctly, but why are the developers mad? It looks like to me that the Ouya people are the ones losing the money. Aren't developers getting the money they need to make the game?

Perhaps my reading comprehension is just awful, but I'm still not sure I understand everything about this.

Posted by the_purgatory_station

Hey Patrick, thanks for putting this up. I'm not dialed in much so I don't know much about these things going on. Maybe it's just me but it seems a lot of unscrupulous stuff have been going on.

On off topic rant about kickstarter. Remember that Casey Malone post on how kickstarter let that project go through. I didn't even know about it until I saw it by chance on Brad's tweet on the side column on Giant Bomb.

Without getting too long I was upset and not satisfied how that concluded. Kickstarter states that they're creator biased for obvious reasons. I don't think you can create a morality board to screen projects because "morality" is such a relative term. There are definitely stuff I would find ok but others don't.

I don't know it just seems kickstarter is happy to sit back and count the money that rolls in. I've reported a project and it still going on. Again that "morality" thing.

I think there are good projects out there but some just.... And for kickstarter not to care really bothers me.

There is that line from Matchstick Men where Nicolas Cage says I don't take people's money. People give me their money.

Sorry about this. Just had to get that off my chest.

Posted by SLowrAM

I think a large problem is that limiting a Kickstarter to Ouya if even for just 6 months would limit the pool of interested consumers immediately. I would expect Ouya owners to fall into 2 categories: those that buy many gadgets and have some excess cash, and those that can't afford a 360, ps4, or wiiu. I don't see the first group buying in as they'd rather play a game on a better platform like the 360 or pc. I don't see the second group being large enough for a kickstarter game to reach a reasonable target, unless it were something major in which case it wouldn't be targeting Ouya.

Edited by Brodehouse

@sooty said:

as a valid argument for backing up the Ouya not being a failed console

I don't know what a 'failed' or 'victorious' console is, I just know whether or not a product is applicable for me at the price. Straight up, I don't think it's earned its money back for me yet, but it's still early.

My video/streaming solution until the Ouya was Universal Media Server onto either the 360 or PS3, and while that worked fine for 480 stuff, my Wifi situation sucked too hard to stream 720 stuff or anything with subtitles (so my gf couldn't watch anime on the big TV). Situation resolved, home life better.

Posted by bkfountain

it sucks that the ouya is ran by morons, but I bought it as a $100 emulator and xbmc box. It's worth it for that to me, too bad the indie gaming side of it isn't going to live up to its promise.

Posted by sissylion

I love how the entire Ouya business model has been them thinking that there is literally nowhere else for indie developers to get their games published. There's a lot of (rightful) criticism about people like Kotick running their companies like general product CEOs and not really understanding video games, but everyone in charge of the Ouya seems like a gross parody of people like them.

Posted by porjos

Excellent article, here's to hoping Ouya will follow it's own advice, take in meaningful feedback, and rebound thoughtfully with a marketing/policy change.

Edited by Brodehouse

I love how the entire Ouya business model has been them thinking that there is literally nowhere else for indie developers to get their games published.

The thing was, at the time, it was the best option for people to play indie games on their TV. Steam Greenlight and Big Picture were still unproven, and Microsoft, Sony and ... ha, Nintendo, weren't talking about indie games. Things have changed and the market must seem awful crowded for the Ouya.

  • 150 results
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3