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Rod Humble Would Like You to Meet Linden Lab 2.0

The creators of Second Life and the former leader of The Sims are going to release four new games in the next month. The goal? Empower the player.

It’s been almost two years since Rod Humble quit Electronic Arts, and left The Sims behind. There was genuine wide-eyed surprise when Humble revealed his new home at Linden Lab, creators of virtual world Second Life.

Humble became the man in charge of The Sims, starting with The Sims 2 and into The Sims 3.

Humble isn’t just a designer at Linden Lab, either--he’s the CEO. Only now, however, can we see what Humble is working towards. Linden Lab isn’t leaving behind the bread-and-butter that is Second Life, which generated $75 million in 2011, but it’s growing beyond it.

That shift is coming with four brand-new games all in the next month, each with Humble’s fingerprints on them. His involvement with each games varies project-to-project, but the big idea to finally move past Second Life, and establish a new identify, was his.

“When I was thinking about leaving EA,” said Humble during a recent meeting. “I was going to do my own company, and it was going to be around creative spaces--games that emphasize creativity tools more. When the opportunity came up and Linden Lab got in touch...first of all, Second Life? Is that still around? [laughs] I looked, and it was really, really healthy. Also, it was a company that was ready made to do a whole bunch of other products, which I wanted to do.”

Second Life is not going away, though, and most of the company is still working on it. But empowering users with robust tools to foster creativity is the new mantra. Anything the company creates must have this ethos in mind. Humble admits it’s difficult; it’s infinitely easier to craft tools only for a developer and make something magical for the user. Every time that comes up, Humble and the team takes a deep breath, and focuses back on the users.

“There’s nothing, frankly, more rewarding than when you release something and people are like ‘hey, this is mine!’ as opposed to looking at your content,” he said.

It’s not a surprise to hear this from Humble, a protegee of Will Wright, and someone who previously worked on EverQuest and SubSpace. Yeah, SubSpace.

The first game that underscores this new approach is Patterns. Already launched in “genesis” form, which was described as pre-alpha, Patterns has much in common with the object creation of Minecraft. There’s one very key distinction with Patterns, though. Minecraft lets you build anything without consequence, and there are no physics. With Patterns, you must take into account structural integrity, especially as it relates to design and building materials, and the game is constantly providing you feedback. Don’t listen to the feedback and it all falls apart.

Play Patterns with your 10-year-old son, as Humble recently did, and you’ll learn the lesson quickly.

“My son loves Minecraft, he loves all those kinds of games,” he said. “One of the things that physics brought home is that it turns out architects know what they’re doing! [laughs] First thing we did was build a house, right? So we made it in a typical style. [But] when you’re building it with actual physics and weight, the bottom collapses!”

Patterns has--shocker--players collecting material in order to build stuff. There are some smart additions, though. In addition to unlocking new pre-made objects the game’s creators have put together, you can go into a Spore-like object creator and make whatever you want with whatever you’ve harvested. Don’t have access to a wedge yet? Make your own, save it, and use that to make sturdier bridges and more complicated creations. The developers hadn’t yet built in support for spheres and other s objects, but players have already found a way to make it happen.

Humble told a similar story from Spore. The development team didn't design tools to support the creation of humans because it would look silly. One day after the tools were in the wild, users found a way to make humans anyway.

Roughly a year from now, Patterns will launch into version 1.0--again, pretty similar to Minecraft. Multiplayer is later this year, an avatar editor is coming soon, and feature lists are collected from users on the game’s site all the time. There is an internal roadmap at Linden Lab, but it’s also built to twist and turn based on the whims of the players.

The Minecraft comparison is not a coincidence, and it’s also not something that Humble shies away from. It wasn’t always that way, though. When Patterns was first being shown, Humble was worried about what Minecraft creator Markus “Notch” Persson might think about invoking his game so often.

“The Minecraft question is an ethical issue for us,” he said. “I was really concerned beforehand. How do we address that? Clearly, we’ve been inspired by Second Life, but also a lot by Minecraft. I don’t want to talk about the guy’s games, trading off his name, but I also don’t want to pretend like Minecraft doesn’t exist.”

Through a mutual friend, Humble was able to reach out to Persson, who gave a thumbs up, and even mentioned the game on Twitter.

The other game Humble was ready to show, Creatorverse, won’t be ready for your PC or Mac until a bit yet, but anyone with an iPad will be able to try soon, pending approval from Apple. Creatorverse is more of a toolkit to create Rube Goldberg-like interactive toys than anything else.

Humble loaded up the app, which starts with a white screen. First, he drew a box, colored it in and tried to convince me it was a car. He made a better argument when two circles were underneath it, but when he clicked “play,” everything fell apart. By tapping the left side of the screen and pulling up his toolbox, Humble added joints that merged the “wheels” with the “car,” and gave the wheels a movement ability. Finally, he added a squiggly green line beneath everything, and clicked play again. The car roared to life...and then quickly fell off, tumbling into oblivion.

Each creation can be uploaded into the cloud, and both played and edited by anybody. The goal is to bring some Second Life sensibilities to Creatorverse eventually, too, such as giving users the ability to charge for them. (That can't happen on iOS, though.) One of the more ambitious toys created by pre-release users was a pinball machine.

It all reminded me of LittleBigPlanet, except not restricted to a platform directed at hardcore players.

In the next few weeks, the other two games will launch. Dio is a room creator, in which players can do everything from construct a choose-your-own adventure to develop an interactive wedding album. One user made a guide to their horse stables. The other game is, perhaps, the most fascinating. Versu, the result of acquiring LittleTextPeople earlier this year, comes from interactive fiction author Emily Short and The Sims 3 AI designer Richard Evans. It’s a storytelling toolset, and players assign characters a set of motivations. Characters then react to the actions of the player, and the story is procedurally generated. The first release is aimed at murder mystery and romance stories.

By launching all four so close to one another, Humble hopes to change the perception of Linden Lab, and begin to have people who wrote the company off as just “the Second Life company” to come back and have another look.

“Second Life is one of those things that probably had too much PR at some point, and it was of a certain variety,” said Humble.

To most, Second Life is a thing places like CNN reported on every few months about how users can make money selling virtual real-estate. It’s not on the radar of most “hardcore” players, if I’m to use a broad and reductive term. Patterns, Creataverse, Dio, and Versu are of a different variety, while still channeling Second Life's creative virtues.

“I’ve sat through an awful lot of company vision statements in my time, and I loathe them with such a passion,” he said. “But the only ones I think are vaguely effective are ones where you can say ‘okay, what design choice should I make?’ And this one, at least, has that.”

Patrick Klepek on Google+
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Posted by patrickklepek

It’s been almost two years since Rod Humble quit Electronic Arts, and left The Sims behind. There was genuine wide-eyed surprise when Humble revealed his new home at Linden Lab, creators of virtual world Second Life.

Humble became the man in charge of The Sims, starting with The Sims 2 and into The Sims 3.

Humble isn’t just a designer at Linden Lab, either--he’s the CEO. Only now, however, can we see what Humble is working towards. Linden Lab isn’t leaving behind the bread-and-butter that is Second Life, which generated $75 million in 2011, but it’s growing beyond it.

That shift is coming with four brand-new games all in the next month, each with Humble’s fingerprints on them. His involvement with each games varies project-to-project, but the big idea to finally move past Second Life, and establish a new identify, was his.

“When I was thinking about leaving EA,” said Humble during a recent meeting. “I was going to do my own company, and it was going to be around creative spaces--games that emphasize creativity tools more. When the opportunity came up and Linden Lab got in touch...first of all, Second Life? Is that still around? [laughs] I looked, and it was really, really healthy. Also, it was a company that was ready made to do a whole bunch of other products, which I wanted to do.”

Second Life is not going away, though, and most of the company is still working on it. But empowering users with robust tools to foster creativity is the new mantra. Anything the company creates must have this ethos in mind. Humble admits it’s difficult; it’s infinitely easier to craft tools only for a developer and make something magical for the user. Every time that comes up, Humble and the team takes a deep breath, and focuses back on the users.

“There’s nothing, frankly, more rewarding than when you release something and people are like ‘hey, this is mine!’ as opposed to looking at your content,” he said.

It’s not a surprise to hear this from Humble, a protegee of Will Wright, and someone who previously worked on EverQuest and SubSpace. Yeah, SubSpace.

The first game that underscores this new approach is Patterns. Already launched in “genesis” form, which was described as pre-alpha, Patterns has much in common with the object creation of Minecraft. There’s one very key distinction with Patterns, though. Minecraft lets you build anything without consequence, and there are no physics. With Patterns, you must take into account structural integrity, especially as it relates to design and building materials, and the game is constantly providing you feedback. Don’t listen to the feedback and it all falls apart.

Play Patterns with your 10-year-old son, as Humble recently did, and you’ll learn the lesson quickly.

“My son loves Minecraft, he loves all those kinds of games,” he said. “One of the things that physics brought home is that it turns out architects know what they’re doing! [laughs] First thing we did was build a house, right? So we made it in a typical style. [But] when you’re building it with actual physics and weight, the bottom collapses!”

Patterns has--shocker--players collecting material in order to build stuff. There are some smart additions, though. In addition to unlocking new pre-made objects the game’s creators have put together, you can go into a Spore-like object creator and make whatever you want with whatever you’ve harvested. Don’t have access to a wedge yet? Make your own, save it, and use that to make sturdier bridges and more complicated creations. The developers hadn’t yet built in support for spheres and other s objects, but players have already found a way to make it happen.

Humble told a similar story from Spore. The development team didn't design tools to support the creation of humans because it would look silly. One day after the tools were in the wild, users found a way to make humans anyway.

Roughly a year from now, Patterns will launch into version 1.0--again, pretty similar to Minecraft. Multiplayer is later this year, an avatar editor is coming soon, and feature lists are collected from users on the game’s site all the time. There is an internal roadmap at Linden Lab, but it’s also built to twist and turn based on the whims of the players.

The Minecraft comparison is not a coincidence, and it’s also not something that Humble shies away from. It wasn’t always that way, though. When Patterns was first being shown, Humble was worried about what Minecraft creator Markus “Notch” Persson might think about invoking his game so often.

“The Minecraft question is an ethical issue for us,” he said. “I was really concerned beforehand. How do we address that? Clearly, we’ve been inspired by Second Life, but also a lot by Minecraft. I don’t want to talk about the guy’s games, trading off his name, but I also don’t want to pretend like Minecraft doesn’t exist.”

Through a mutual friend, Humble was able to reach out to Persson, who gave a thumbs up, and even mentioned the game on Twitter.

The other game Humble was ready to show, Creatorverse, won’t be ready for your PC or Mac until a bit yet, but anyone with an iPad will be able to try soon, pending approval from Apple. Creatorverse is more of a toolkit to create Rube Goldberg-like interactive toys than anything else.

Humble loaded up the app, which starts with a white screen. First, he drew a box, colored it in and tried to convince me it was a car. He made a better argument when two circles were underneath it, but when he clicked “play,” everything fell apart. By tapping the left side of the screen and pulling up his toolbox, Humble added joints that merged the “wheels” with the “car,” and gave the wheels a movement ability. Finally, he added a squiggly green line beneath everything, and clicked play again. The car roared to life...and then quickly fell off, tumbling into oblivion.

Each creation can be uploaded into the cloud, and both played and edited by anybody. The goal is to bring some Second Life sensibilities to Creatorverse eventually, too, such as giving users the ability to charge for them. (That can't happen on iOS, though.) One of the more ambitious toys created by pre-release users was a pinball machine.

It all reminded me of LittleBigPlanet, except not restricted to a platform directed at hardcore players.

In the next few weeks, the other two games will launch. Dio is a room creator, in which players can do everything from construct a choose-your-own adventure to develop an interactive wedding album. One user made a guide to their horse stables. The other game is, perhaps, the most fascinating. Versu, the result of acquiring LittleTextPeople earlier this year, comes from interactive fiction author Emily Short and The Sims 3 AI designer Richard Evans. It’s a storytelling toolset, and players assign characters a set of motivations. Characters then react to the actions of the player, and the story is procedurally generated. The first release is aimed at murder mystery and romance stories.

By launching all four so close to one another, Humble hopes to change the perception of Linden Lab, and begin to have people who wrote the company off as just “the Second Life company” to come back and have another look.

“Second Life is one of those things that probably had too much PR at some point, and it was of a certain variety,” said Humble.

To most, Second Life is a thing places like CNN reported on every few months about how users can make money selling virtual real-estate. It’s not on the radar of most “hardcore” players, if I’m to use a broad and reductive term. Patterns, Creataverse, Dio, and Versu are of a different variety, while still channeling Second Life's creative virtues.

“I’ve sat through an awful lot of company vision statements in my time, and I loathe them with such a passion,” he said. “But the only ones I think are vaguely effective are ones where you can say ‘okay, what design choice should I make?’ And this one, at least, has that.”

Edited by WonderboyCoz

What is this? hmm, these videos are pretty cool.

Posted by Rowr

Rod humble is awesome and i will look at anything he is involved in.

Posted by stalefishies

I saw the trailer for Patterns and immediately went out and bought it.
 
It's been a long time since a trailer like that sold me on a game so hard, but as soon as I saw it, I was immediately reminded, not necessarily of the Minecraft of now, but the old, free Minecraft (back when it was awkwardly similar to Infiniminer, which is a game more people should be aware of). I vastly preferred the raw building and creating aspect of the free Minecraft to the version that exists now, and Patterns looks like it's riffing off that a lot more than Minecraft does. So I'm super excited too see what becomes of it, and I'm totally OK with investing $10 to find out first-hand.

Posted by Jayzilla

This has promise. I was similarly excited for Spore when I saw Will Wright speak at a panel for Spore at ComiCon in 2008. The creature creator turned out to be the best thing about that game though and the actual game itself was about creation while trying to explain evolution which was funny. Hopefully, Patterns' systems are more fleshed out.

Posted by Mikular

Versu sounds interesting, I'll definitely give that a look.

Edited by Eviternal

I don't mean to be rude to but there are a number of typos: "Tthe", "an a toolkit" and "gnerated".

An interesting article, nonetheless.

Posted by AlmostSwedish

This article deserves more comments.

@stalefishies said:

I saw the trailer for Patterns and immediately went out and bought it.

It's been a long time since a trailer like that sold me on a game so hard, but as soon as I saw it, I was immediately reminded, not necessarily of the Minecraft of now, but the old, free Minecraft (back when it was awkwardly similar to Infiniminer, which is a game more people should be aware of). I vastly preferred the raw building and creating aspect of the free Minecraft to the version that exists now, and Patterns looks like it's riffing off that a lot more than Minecraft does. So I'm super excited too see what becomes of it, and I'm totally OK with investing $10 to find out first-hand.

I'm not quite sure what you're refering to. Sure, the survival mode has become less creator friendly since the hunger mechanic was added, but there's still the pure creative mode. Any way, I'm also super interested in what they're doing. I hope we will se a QL of Patterns, since I'm currently a little short on money.

Btw, we shoukd think of a name for this genre of games (Minecraft, Patterns, possibly Kerbal Space Program) so people would stop throwing around the term "Minecraft clone".

Posted by Ravenlight

Oh good. Another videogame for the girlfriends of the world to play.

Posted by chiablo

I am so goddamned sick of minecraft clones and pixel art platformers.

Posted by ImHungry

Versu sounds incredibly interesting. Any announcements for platforms for it?

Posted by patrickklepek

@Eviternal said:

I don't mean to be rude to but there are a number of typos: "Tthe", "an a toolkit" and "gnerated".

An interesting article, nonetheless.

Not rude, appreciated. Always.

Posted by psylah

I spent some time in Second Life. And just like the internet itself, Second Life is for porn.

It was part of a business technology course in college, and we spent the whole semester having meetings in second life.

I showed up as a woman with devil horns, hooves and a giant mass of tentacles growing out of my back.

Ah, college.

Posted by Unequivocable

Patterns looks pretty cool--and that's a classy move reaching out to Notch ahead of it. I think we actually need more variation in the "Minecraft clone" space, and it's cool to hear innovation being done correctly.

Posted by Ricerx

More FMV games, Less Minecraft clones

Posted by TheVideoHustler

I wonder what this means for The Sims? I was figuring (like with the Sims 1 and 2) this most recent release was going to mark the end of The Sims 3, and we would start hearing about The Sims 4 soon. But with Rod Humble gone, I'm unsure as to what will happen next.

Posted by dvorak

Patterns looks cool, but Linden Labs is one of the shittiest game developers there is. You only need to look at the absolute wasteland that is Second Life to know that.

Posted by ArbitraryWater

Is it weird that the only thing that comes to mind whenever Second Life is mentioned is Shawn Elliot talking about it on GFW Radio?

Posted by Ben_H
@psylah said:

I spent some time in Second Life. And just like the internet itself, Second Life is for porn.

It was part of a business technology course in college, and we spent the whole semester having meetings in second life.

I showed up as a woman with devil horns, hooves and a giant mass of tentacles growing out of my back.

Ah, college.

Hey! There's a song for that! 
   
Posted by Elwoodan

@AlmostSwedish said:

Btw, we shoukd think of a name for this genre of games (Minecraft, Patterns, possibly Kerbal Space Program) so people would stop throwing around the term "Minecraft clone".

eventually they will be "sandbox games" or "construction games" or some such, all "new" (or newly exploited) genres go through this phase; such as when FPS were DOOM clones, or ARPGs were Diablo clones.

Posted by Nonentity

God dammit, Rod Humble just got me to give money to Linden Labs.

I am legitimately excited about Patterns.

Edited by Hef

I saw Patterns on youtube the other day. Never thought it was from Rod Humble

Posted by Itwastuesday

i think these guys suck so much

Posted by Gaga_Gracious

I think the 1st three games are great for children up to 25 years of age but only the last game, Versu holds the remotest interest for me personally. I will watch out for that one but the rest I will leave on the shelf.

Edited by vinsanityv22

How the fuck did Second Life generate $75 million in 2011? Who the fuck plays Second Life besides weirdos? And there's nothing they moved onto since it came out? It looks like shit, like Everquest 1. How are those weirdos still playing Second Life?

I can't even read the rest of the article yet. That information is staggering. I need a minute here, Patrick...

EDIT: Okay, read on. Patterns looks legitimately interesting. It's no GameGlobe, but it looks interesting in it's own right. Don't agree with this statement though, Pat: "It all reminded me of LittleBigPlanet, except not restricted to a platform directed at hardcore players.". Sackboy and friends are Sony's most Nintendo-like IP; they attract all audiences. The editor maybe hardcore, but the LBP games are for everyone.

Posted by GwynethLlewelyn

Oh great article. It will take some time for people to realise that Linden Lab is "not just the company which created Second Life a decade ago", but it's thanks to articles like yours that this will eventually happen. Eventually. It's like WordPress: it powers half of all US domains and a sixth of all websites in the world, but people still think "oh WordPress? That's a free tool to create blogs, isn't it?" :) Changing the perception we have of a company takes really a long time.

I have just a stupid comment to make. While it's nice to place a picture of Second Life on the article... why did you choose something that seems to have been rendered on an Intel GMA 950 in 2006? It gives your audience — like — the totally wrong idea of what Second Life looks like. Even in 2006 it looked better than that! I give an example on my own profile page here (it's the background image) which shows how 6-year-old non-gamer hardware can render Second Life in 2012. Now imagine what extra things one could add with some serious, contemporary hardware.

To I can only answer that with 25 million registered users or so, Second Life truly has a lot of weirdos ;) And — prepare to get shocked — a lot of them actually play MMORPGs, designed by themselves, inside Second Life. The most insane weirdos like myself just log in to Second Life to debate philosophy and do meditation classes. So it's not "just about weirdos" — it's about the amazing variety of millions of different types of weirdos that log in to Second Life every day, and have been doing so for over nine years now. There is something for all of us, no matter what kind of weirdo one is :)

Posted by HansKaosu

Patterns is awesome.

Posted by justonemoreloon

Rod has abandoned SL and sucked all the cash out of Linden Labs for his stupid games.

Posted by justonemoreloon

@psylah said:

I spent some time in Second Life. And just like the internet itself, Second Life is for porn.

Tell that to independent musicians making a living performing live music. Getting on live tours because of the exposure.

Performing to the world.

Is there porn there? Sure. There's a whole adult "continent" now, where all the porn goes. If all you found was porn it's because that's all you looked for.

Proudly,

JustOneMore Loon

Posted by psylah

@justonemoreloon said:

@psylah said:

I spent some time in Second Life. And just like the internet itself, Second Life is for porn.

Tell that to independent musicians making a living performing live music. Getting on live tours because of the exposure.

Performing to the world.

Is there porn there? Sure. There's a whole adult "continent" now, where all the porn goes. If all you found was porn it's because that's all you looked for.

Proudly,

JustOneMore Loon

I actually spent spare time in SL idling at a sim called Blue Heron, and once a week they would have a live performance. It was my job to stop folks from spawning 40-story tall penises during the performances. I was volunteering, but I felt like I was trying to help out in SL.

I was still the hooved demon tentacle lady though.

Posted by justonemoreloon

@psylah said:

I actually spent spare time in SL idling at a sim called Blue Heron, and once a week they would have a live performance. It was my job to stop folks from spawning 40-story tall penises during the performances. I was volunteering, but I felt like I was trying to help out in SL.

I was still the hooved demon tentacle lady though.

Griefing is down in SL- sure there are still kids out there who think that it's fun to upset a performance. Bullies are bullies... in any world.

Feel free to login and find me- I'd be happy to show you lots of great live music.

Posted by envane

@justonemoreloon said:

@psylah said:

I spent some time in Second Life. And just like the internet itself, Second Life is for porn.

Tell that to independent musicians making a living performing live music. Getting on live tours because of the exposure.

Performing to the world.

Is there porn there? Sure. There's a whole adult "continent" now, where all the porn goes. If all you found was porn it's because that's all you looked for.

Proudly,

JustOneMore Loon

isnt it cute .. the second life ppl learned how to use the internet but still use an old letter writing format ... they think they are people

Posted by BitterAlmond

Just take my money already, Patterns!

Posted by Gaga_Gracious

Second Life is far from old school and can still be a great platform to build your own games on. It just costs too much at $1000 setup fee for a single 256X256 region with 15000 prim's. Then you got to find $295 a month for tier. So, if you have got the money to spend or you fancy trying your hand at making stuff to sell then the cost can be off-set.

Personally, I moved on to Open Simulator which is a look alike clone of SL some time ago which costs a lot less - like I can have 16 regions with a 100,000 prim's for as little as a $100 a month if I use a virtual dedicated server and learn how to run the software. You see, OpenSim is open sources and free!

Anyone can use it to build their own game world and, just like Gary's mod, construct just what you want then invite others to join you in your world. I added an OpenSim attachment to the Second Life Overview if it interests anyone.

I also added a bog post to my wall which shows my own endeavors building the Steam Corsairs of the Barbary Coast RPG.

The forum post is Steam Corsairs of the Barbary Coast and explains my own RPG plans and provides information about the OpenSim platform.

Posted by yoshikofazuku

Very interesting I would say for those interested in minecraft style games

Posted by SickHippie

Well, he's got my interest piqued. Looking forward to this one too.

Posted by DarriusGothly

While you and others may be excited by the "New Games" implemented by Mr. Humble, your comments about Linden Lab not abandoning Second Life are incorrect and under-informed. Linden Lab has cherry-picked from their SL staff to flesh out the developers for their new offerings, yet they retain the same management that has pushed SL into the death-watch holding pattern it has been hovering in for the past few years. Rod came on board LL and crowed how excited he was to find a ready-made platform with such a vibrant, dedicated and diverse customer base .. then promptly vanished into the fog to cannibalize whatever he could to create something new.

LL has the right to do with SL as they please, but their strict adherence to silence, misdirection and customer-hostile support has been quietly killing it off while sucking every penny possible to finance their new ventures. I'm not a big fan of companies that deceive the existing customers while abandoning established and thriving micro-businesses .. the self-same businesses that made LL the success it is and even today continue to keep their doors open with our cash flow into their coffers.

The new customer base they're chasing is generally more prone to hit-n-git game play, typified by following the "Thing of the Day" .. and far less willing to work hard to make the game a success. IMO they've tossed out the solid business they had because the twinkle of the new suckered them in. They've exchanged a solid, reliable income earning platform for a non-stop game of chasing the ever-changing and elusive golden ring. Short-term success will inevitably lead to medium-term faceplants as the newness wears off and their "New" turns into "Been there, bored with that."

If anything will finally kill off Second Life, it is the clear path toward rapid decline that will result from sinking so much into games that have no longevity, no user loyalty .. and no end to the boatloads of money they will require to stay somewhere near the front of the curve. As they dig deeper and deeper into their various income streams to chase this new dream, they will eventually carve so much out of SL that it too will buckle under the lack of support. And shortly after that will come the back-page epitaphs in trade mags reviewing the great things Linden Lab did before they turned into the weeds to follow the rainbow.

Posted by Giantstalker

This sounds insane, but after seeing Patterns, I may actually interested in something from Linden Labs.

You know what, that phrase still sounds weird. But still... I had no idea this stuff existed at all!

Edited by DeviTiffany

Second Life has always been a lot like EVE Online to me, I'm way too intimidated by it to actually want to install and play it but all the stories I hear come out of it are fascinating. However, EVE seems to have less three dicked shemale fox people in bondage gear. EVE really needs to step up their game.

Posted by YukoAsho

Linden Lab already doesn't maintain Second Life, not sure how that's going to change. Yes, I'm fucking bitter.

Posted by VirtualE

This looks like its going in a good direction. Can't wait to play it. Power to the people.