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The Past, Present, And Future of GameStop's California Used Games Settlement

How one customer's purchase of Dragon Age: Origins forced GameStop's hand, and whether it means anything for used games going forward.

Unless an unexpected hiccup occurs, for the next two years, GameStop locations in California will have to better inform customers about downloadable content tied to new games when they purchase used, and, over the next several months, must pay $15 to anyone who bought a used game believing everything on the box was on the disc.

James Collins is the one who got the ball rolling on this.

It’s unlikely Collins is the only person who has dreamed of suing GameStop, but on March 23, 2010, Collins made the step that most people don’t: he lawyered up and filed a class action lawsuit against the Texas-based retailer.

“GameStop tricks consumers into paying more for a used game than they would if they purchased the same game and content new,” reads the original class action filing from late March.

Dragon Age: Origins is one of many games that now ship with content free only if the game's new.

Collins purchased a used copy of Dragon Age: Origins for $54.99, roughly $5 less than what it would have cost to purchase it brand-new, from a GameStop in Hayward, California on January 6. The game’s box promises free downloadable content for buying the game, when in reality, it’s only free if you’re purchasing a new copy with an unused redemption code found inside. Collins claimed to have no knowledge of this, and played the game until “on or around” January 19, when he returned to GameStop to complain about having to pay more money to access said additional content.

The DLC would cost Collins $15, meaning he only saved $5 from the used game purchase--a $10 loss. Since it was more then seven days, per GameStop policy, GameStop refused his return.

So he filed a lawsuit.

Matthew Proctor and Danoby Ortiz have a similar story. For Proctor, the game was The Saboteur. For Ortiz, it was Resident Evil 5: Gold Edition. Since the lawsuits were filed as class actions, meaning the outcome can benefit more than just the individuals who filed the claim, the lawsuits were combined.

The first details on the settlement were announced in a press release last week by law firm Baron & Budd.

GameStop has not responded to my requests for comment on the settlement.

What happened is a preliminary ruling by the courts on the settlement agreement. There will not be a trial, though a trial was the original goal of Collins’ lawsuit. There’s an unlikely chance the settlement dies, as there is a period between now and September 17 for objection from outside parties. Those parties do not include GameStop, who has already agreed to the terms of the settlement.

If you purchased a used game from GameStop between March 23, 2006 and April 9, 2012, you’re affected.

And because it’s a settlement, GameStop doesn’t have to admit it did anything wrong.

“Neither this Agreement, nor any exhibit or document referenced herein nor any act performed or document executed pursuant to this Settlement Agreement [...] shall be construed as, or deemed to be evidence of, an admission or concession by GameStop.”

What happens next? For starters, there’s a website: www.gamestopsettlement.com.

Since the preliminary approval, GameStop has handed over applicable customer information to the claims administrator handling the case. The aforementioned website will (soon) have claims forms, but if GameStop has your details, that's coming via mail or email. GameStop has information for customers who have used its PowerUp program, but if you aren’t part of that program, you can still get your money. That’s where it gets a little weird.

For example, the used games affected by the lawsuit will not be disclosed. Games affected, according to the law firm, include ones “that offered free downloadable content to consumers of a new copy that was not available without additional payment to people who purchased a used copy of the game.” If your game fits that, you're good.

Used games have and probably will remain a common scapegoat for the industry's problems.

The other strange thing? Consumers can, should they chose to then be legally liable, make claims on purchases that may or may not have happened. You only have to enter the game name, date of purchase, location of purchase and whether the extra content would have been available through Xbox Live or PlayStation Network.

“Option Two Claim: Settlement Class members may elect to receive a $5 payment and a $10 Store Credit. Settlement Class members who elect to make an Option Two Claim shall not be required to provide proof of purchase, nor shall it be required that GameStop verify their purchase through GameStop’s own records.”

To protect against fraud, the claim form underscores you’re making statements under penalty of perjury.

“With the understanding that many people do not save receipts from relatively small consumer purchases like video games, and that not everyone who may have purchased a qualifying used game is a member of GameStop’s PowerUp rewards program," the law firm told me in a statement, "the parties came up with Option 2 as a way for those people to be compensated.

That said, you can’t rack up hundreds of dollars in claims. Even if you bought dozens of used games, it only amounts to one payout.

Going option two entitles you to $5 in real-world money and $10 in GameStop credit towards used products. If you provide a PowerUp number, they can verify the purchase and offer $10 in real-world money and just $5 in GameStop credit. Again, it's only a single payout, and even in the event that consumers are actively defrauding GameStop, keep this in mind: most of the money being paid out will probably go right back to GameStop.

Claims must be postmarked by July 19, and the claim forms are below. Do not use these claim forms, as they are not final. The correct claim forms will eventually be available on the website.

In addition to the pseudo refunds, GameStop stores in California must also have “shelf takers” (you know, this stuff) near used games, warning consumers about possible additional purchases related to used games, counter mats that include similar warnings, and a disclaimer on GameStop’s official website. All of this will last for two years.

Having established a legal framework, the law firm is already seeking individuals with similar stories in states other than California, but lawyer Andrew Ehmke of Texas-based Haynes and Boone is hesitant to read too much into it.

“That seems unlikely,” Ehmke told me. “What might happen, though, is that GameStop might be sued in a handful of the larger states. On the flip side, GameStop could also be considering options to minimize the risk from these future lawsuits by preemptively providing a similar settlement offer to any of its customers, but that’s speculation on my part.”

One scenario could involve GameStop getting ahead of the problem, rather than untangling a series of legal battles.

“I would not be surprised to see GameStop adjust its marketing, advertising and pricing across the country for used games that contain the first-time buyer one-time use codes,” said Ehmke. “It may be too much of an administrative hassle to have different pricing and advertising in different states.”

Want to read more? Get your legal on.

Patrick Klepek on Google+
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Posted by patrickklepek

Unless an unexpected hiccup occurs, for the next two years, GameStop locations in California will have to better inform customers about downloadable content tied to new games when they purchase used, and, over the next several months, must pay $15 to anyone who bought a used game believing everything on the box was on the disc.

James Collins is the one who got the ball rolling on this.

It’s unlikely Collins is the only person who has dreamed of suing GameStop, but on March 23, 2010, Collins made the step that most people don’t: he lawyered up and filed a class action lawsuit against the Texas-based retailer.

“GameStop tricks consumers into paying more for a used game than they would if they purchased the same game and content new,” reads the original class action filing from late March.

Dragon Age: Origins is one of many games that now ship with content free only if the game's new.

Collins purchased a used copy of Dragon Age: Origins for $54.99, roughly $5 less than what it would have cost to purchase it brand-new, from a GameStop in Hayward, California on January 6. The game’s box promises free downloadable content for buying the game, when in reality, it’s only free if you’re purchasing a new copy with an unused redemption code found inside. Collins claimed to have no knowledge of this, and played the game until “on or around” January 19, when he returned to GameStop to complain about having to pay more money to access said additional content.

The DLC would cost Collins $15, meaning he only saved $5 from the used game purchase--a $10 loss. Since it was more then seven days, per GameStop policy, GameStop refused his return.

So he filed a lawsuit.

Matthew Proctor and Danoby Ortiz have a similar story. For Proctor, the game was The Saboteur. For Ortiz, it was Resident Evil 5: Gold Edition. Since the lawsuits were filed as class actions, meaning the outcome can benefit more than just the individuals who filed the claim, the lawsuits were combined.

The first details on the settlement were announced in a press release last week by law firm Baron & Budd.

GameStop has not responded to my requests for comment on the settlement.

What happened is a preliminary ruling by the courts on the settlement agreement. There will not be a trial, though a trial was the original goal of Collins’ lawsuit. There’s an unlikely chance the settlement dies, as there is a period between now and September 17 for objection from outside parties. Those parties do not include GameStop, who has already agreed to the terms of the settlement.

If you purchased a used game from GameStop between March 23, 2006 and April 9, 2012, you’re affected.

And because it’s a settlement, GameStop doesn’t have to admit it did anything wrong.

“Neither this Agreement, nor any exhibit or document referenced herein nor any act performed or document executed pursuant to this Settlement Agreement [...] shall be construed as, or deemed to be evidence of, an admission or concession by GameStop.”

What happens next? For starters, there’s a website: www.gamestopsettlement.com.

Since the preliminary approval, GameStop has handed over applicable customer information to the claims administrator handling the case. The aforementioned website will (soon) have claims forms, but if GameStop has your details, that's coming via mail or email. GameStop has information for customers who have used its PowerUp program, but if you aren’t part of that program, you can still get your money. That’s where it gets a little weird.

For example, the used games affected by the lawsuit will not be disclosed. Games affected, according to the law firm, include ones “that offered free downloadable content to consumers of a new copy that was not available without additional payment to people who purchased a used copy of the game.” If your game fits that, you're good.

Used games have and probably will remain a common scapegoat for the industry's problems.

The other strange thing? Consumers can, should they chose to then be legally liable, make claims on purchases that may or may not have happened. You only have to enter the game name, date of purchase, location of purchase and whether the extra content would have been available through Xbox Live or PlayStation Network.

“Option Two Claim: Settlement Class members may elect to receive a $5 payment and a $10 Store Credit. Settlement Class members who elect to make an Option Two Claim shall not be required to provide proof of purchase, nor shall it be required that GameStop verify their purchase through GameStop’s own records.”

To protect against fraud, the claim form underscores you’re making statements under penalty of perjury.

“With the understanding that many people do not save receipts from relatively small consumer purchases like video games, and that not everyone who may have purchased a qualifying used game is a member of GameStop’s PowerUp rewards program," the law firm told me in a statement, "the parties came up with Option 2 as a way for those people to be compensated.

That said, you can’t rack up hundreds of dollars in claims. Even if you bought dozens of used games, it only amounts to one payout.

Going option two entitles you to $5 in real-world money and $10 in GameStop credit towards used products. If you provide a PowerUp number, they can verify the purchase and offer $10 in real-world money and just $5 in GameStop credit. Again, it's only a single payout, and even in the event that consumers are actively defrauding GameStop, keep this in mind: most of the money being paid out will probably go right back to GameStop.

Claims must be postmarked by July 19, and the claim forms are below. Do not use these claim forms, as they are not final. The correct claim forms will eventually be available on the website.

In addition to the pseudo refunds, GameStop stores in California must also have “shelf takers” (you know, this stuff) near used games, warning consumers about possible additional purchases related to used games, counter mats that include similar warnings, and a disclaimer on GameStop’s official website. All of this will last for two years.

Having established a legal framework, the law firm is already seeking individuals with similar stories in states other than California, but lawyer Andrew Ehmke of Texas-based Haynes and Boone is hesitant to read too much into it.

“That seems unlikely,” Ehmke told me. “What might happen, though, is that GameStop might be sued in a handful of the larger states. On the flip side, GameStop could also be considering options to minimize the risk from these future lawsuits by preemptively providing a similar settlement offer to any of its customers, but that’s speculation on my part.”

One scenario could involve GameStop getting ahead of the problem, rather than untangling a series of legal battles.

“I would not be surprised to see GameStop adjust its marketing, advertising and pricing across the country for used games that contain the first-time buyer one-time use codes,” said Ehmke. “It may be too much of an administrative hassle to have different pricing and advertising in different states.”

Want to read more? Get your legal on.

Staff
Posted by Phatmac

Gamestop is in a lot of trouble.

Posted by YOUNGLINK

whoa

Posted by csl316

Meh, that's why I just stick to Amazon. No tax (yet), free shipping, and usually a discount or credit on my next purchase. It ends up costing less than a newer used game.

But then again, I never trade in games and don't mind waiting a few days, which are the two reasons Gamestop hasn't been relevant to me in half a dozen years.

Posted by Lucien21

He was only saving $5....I'd have bought a new copy.

Posted by SockemJetpack

Easy fix. Buy new. Support the people that bring the games to you rather than the people that force unwanted pre orders, used games and other crap down your throat. Sure you save the 5 or 10 but aren't there other luxury items you could cut from your budget? Don't get bacon and cheese on the next few burgers you order. Make coffee in the morning instead of buying it for a week. Besides you can find cheaper new games online.

Posted by Deusoma

I am suddenly reminded why Alex should really leave the article-writing to Patrick. This is well worded, professional, even respectful. This is exactly what a gaming news article should be. Good show, old boy. 
 
I wonder if this settlement also applies to EB Games, they don't have GameStops around here. Worth looking into.

Posted by Dallas_Raines

Woo, $5.00 savings, what a fantastic deal. Totally worth buying used over new.

Edited by deerokus

Shops here in the UK (even GameStop's equivalent, Game) just put a sticker on the box saying something like 'DLC/Online Pass not included, please ask staff'. I don't see why that was so hard for GameStop, and why they weren't doing that already.

Shady.

Posted by seannao

@Dallas_Raines:

Sheesh. I bet he could've found it on Amazon at LAUNCH for 10 bucks cheaper.

Posted by IAmNotBatman

Seems like an insane amount of trouble being caused by something that can be solved SO easily.

Posted by SpudBug

How is it they find morons who are willing to "save" $5 on a used game purchase when almost any new release these days goes on sale for $40-$45 within weeks of release? If you look around amazon and a lot of other stores even offer $10-$20 promotional credit or pre-release deals like the witcher 2 this week for $45 at toys r us online. I have always thought that the only way GameStop thrives is on the stupidity and laziness of the average consumer. No one who spends even the smallest amount of time looking for deals would ever shop there.

Posted by cikame

America.

Posted by Smallville123

Ugggh another example of why we are to fucking reliant on lawyers on this country. Reminds me of the lady who burnt her mouth at Mcdonalds for drinking fucking hot coffee....AND WINNING!

Edited by Kosayn

I usually detective it up on any games I'm likely to buy used when they first come out, to see if they even have multiplayer / have online passes / etc.

But I really do hope this will force Gamestop's hand, and they'll start putting "may lack online / dlc" stickers on the used games it applies to. I say "may" because often the codes do still work - a large portion of customers don't put their machines online.

Their head office or even the shop dudes can do the research. In most cases it is uniform per each publisher, for instance, Sega doesn't do DLC codes or Online Passes ever, but EA almost always does. And to be frank those guys need something productive to do with their day. They rearrange the shelves and alphabetize the used bins at my gamestop on a regular basis.

Posted by Skanker

@Deusoma: Alex and Patrick handle different things. I used to think Alex was always snarky, but pretty frequently lately he's been doing a lot of good work with the news. We were barely getting any news before Alex came back anyway.

Edited by Gregalor

The real crime here is that he paid $55 for a two-year-old used game, regardless of what it included. That's crazy.

The Ultimate Edition (including all DLC) has been on sale on Steam for $10 or less numerous times over the last couple of years. The disparity between PC pricing and console pricing continues to amaze me.

And you know what? My $10 went to Bioware. NONE of James Collins' $55 did. Tell me again how Steam sales are bad for the industry. Nothing compares to sucker customers like this guy.

Also, it's the customer's responsibility to keep informed of whether games have additional DLC. I hate Gamestop, too, but come on.

Posted by Mockduck

Great news work as always, Patrick. You are a real asset to Giant Bomb, and I hope you continue to do this kind of effort. It can't be easy to try to do "hard news" in the games industry, as there's not a ton of it being done like this, but keep it up!

Posted by TyCobb

@Smallville123 said:

Ugggh another example of why we are to fucking reliant on lawyers on this country. Reminds me of the lady who burnt her mouth at Mcdonalds for drinking fucking hot coffee....AND WINNING!

Are you talking about the old bitch? She didn't burn her mouth, the coffee spilled on her and caused 3rd degree burns. Granted it really was her fault and McDonalds shouldn't have been sued for serving the public hot coffee like they ordered.

This was bad enough, but I can't imagine what you described. If you really are talking about another incident... never mind, I don't even want to think about it if that is true.

Posted by AiurFlux

@Dallas_Raines said:

Woo, $5.00 savings, what a fantastic deal. Totally worth buying used over new.

Yeah it seems suspicious why someone would pay that much for a reasonably old game, unless he knowingly did so with the intention of suing Gamestop. Honestly I can't blame him though. I've had to deal with some fuckwits at EB Games here in Canada and they honestly don't know their own ass from a hole in the ground. And overall their business practices are deplorable.

Truthfully both Gamestop AND the game publisher should be required to clearly state that the DLC content is only available with a new copy of the game. But given that it's Gamestop making all the money it's more their responsibility when they're the reseller. It should still be clearly marked on the box by the publisher though.

Posted by LordAndrew

I look forward to when the time comes that the codes can't be used at all, even in new copies, because the publisher has shut down the servers. More lawsuits?

Posted by ValiantGrizzly

$55 (or 60) for DA:O?

In 2012?

That thing goes for €10 used here.

15 for DA2.

Posted by Apparatus_Unearth

I've been done with GameStop for a while now, except to buy their PS2/Gamecube games sometimes. Definitely don't buy any current gen games there anymore.

Posted by Toug

It's weird, because on the micro of this guy suing over $10 sounds completely insane, but the macro issue of making GS be more transparent about these sorts of things is a worthwhile cause.

So it's a good result from a fucking crazy-dumb lawsuit. HOW DO I FEEL?

Posted by Turambar
@Smallville123 said:

Ugggh another example of why we are to fucking reliant on lawyers on this country. Reminds me of the lady who burnt her mouth at Mcdonalds for drinking fucking hot coffee....AND WINNING!

Actually, she spilled said coffee on her lap and got a third degree burn from it.  Essentially, it means the coffee was boiling hot where the adjective boiling is used literally and not figuratively.
Online
Posted by GioVANNI

@Gregalor said:

The real crime here is that he paid $55 for a two-year-old used game, regardless of what it included. That's crazy.

The Ultimate Edition (including all DLC) has been on sale on Steam for $10 or less numerous times over the last couple of years. The disparity between PC pricing and console pricing continues to amaze me.

And you know what? My $10 went to Bioware. NONE of James Collins' $55 did. Tell me again how Steam sales are bad for the industry. Nothing compares to sucker customers like this guy.

Yeah, that is absolutely disgusting. This is why people who games need to be informed. It's not like it's hard either; all it takes is a quick Google search and you at least have some information on where it's cheap to buy games.

Posted by Bruce

@digitalsea87:

He filed the lawsuit two years ago...

Posted by Gregalor

Two years ago? Fair enough. He's still a cheapskate who got the rude awakening he deserved.

Posted by micfiygd

He bought dragon age in 2010. Please read the article entirely before insulting people involved.

Posted by Nethlem

@Bruce said:

@digitalsea87:

He filed the lawsuit two years ago...

Ssshh don't tell them that, you are spoiling all the fun this misinformation can cause!

I think stuff like that is a pretty good check on reading comprehension and similar traits. After all it's an pretty long article with so much complicated text. But the results so far seem to be pretty depressing. So mabye education is the better way to go:

"It’s unlikely Collins is the only person who has dreamed of suing GameStop, but on March 23, 2010, Collins made the step that most people don’t: he lawyered up and filed a class action lawsuit against the Texas-based retailer."

Posted by dvorak

Allow me to answer the question the title poses.

"No."

Posted by leem101

@Lucien21 said:

He was only saving $5....I'd have bought a new copy.

that $5 could have went a long way.........

Posted by Albedo12

In CEX they put *Offline* and/or *No DLC* on the price labels of used games to indicate content is missing. Simple.

Posted by Eaxis

It's so stupid to get a game $5 cheaper and it all goes to Gamestop.

Posted by Dom

hmm... isn't it common sense so think that the previous owner used the DLC code, where's the surprise?

Posted by mabans

I find it amazing how many people are actually suspect of the guy suing gamestop when historically they have shady things. Selling pre-opened games as new, The On-Live situation when Dues Ex, not informing players of DLC, shit I remember seeing a GameStop in Camp Pendalton that was selling a Nerf N-Strike as a Wii-Remote gun attachment, to name a few. How gamestop continues to thrive is amazing to me, but that's what happens when you corner a market.. Should interesting how this affects them

Posted by General_Mapache

About time gamers started taking retailers that rip us off.

Posted by Silver-Streak

@csl316:

Sadly, as Amazon expands, expect to see more and more sales tax areas.

Anywhere Amazon has a physical presence (IE, a distribution center), they're required to do sales tax.

Those of us living in Kansas are subject to sales tax from Amazon, due to them having a shipping center here. Sucks.

Posted by Hef

I just don't get why you would take money from developers and give it to gamestop so you can save $5. Their used game trading is a joke for newer games and is almost never worth it.

Also he's the one who's uniformed. I guess gamestop could have informed him about redemption codes and how they only come in new games. But he's also a moron for not knowing about something that has existed long before 2010. Maybe he doesn't buy video games very often, I don't know. But it seems pretty obvious to me and this just reinforces the idea that you can be a lazy consumer and get away with it.

The customer is almost never right.

Posted by drsalvador

Less and less I find myself going into video game retail stores. It's even rarer for me to buy a used game. Most of my video game purchases are done via a website or digitally now. A story like this just discourages me, something like this shouldn't of happened in the first place.

Edited by subyman

So, this only includes people that purchased a game within California?

EDIT: Yes, it only applies to purchases made in Cali.

Posted by csl316

@Eujin said:

@csl316:

Sadly, as Amazon expands, expect to see more and more sales tax areas.

Anywhere Amazon has a physical presence (IE, a distribution center), they're required to do sales tax.

Those of us living in Kansas are subject to sales tax from Amazon, due to them having a shipping center here. Sucks.

True. Illinois has been safe so far but I know that day's coming. Pressure from places like Wal Mart and Best Buy is changing things, as they say it's unfair because Internet tax stuff was lenient early on to boost the industry.

Regardless, it may just lead to lower prices or more credits if they don't wanna lose their customers down the line. Hopefully!

Edited by Pr1mus

@GioVANNI said:

@Gregalor said:

The real crime here is that he paid $55 for a two-year-old used game, regardless of what it included. That's crazy.

The Ultimate Edition (including all DLC) has been on sale on Steam for $10 or less numerous times over the last couple of years. The disparity between PC pricing and console pricing continues to amaze me.

And you know what? My $10 went to Bioware. NONE of James Collins' $55 did. Tell me again how Steam sales are bad for the industry. Nothing compares to sucker customers like this guy.

Yeah, that is absolutely disgusting. This is why people who games need to be informed. It's not like it's hard either; all it takes is a quick Google search and you at least have some information on where it's cheap to buy games.

@digitalsea87 said:

$55 (or 60) for DA:O?

In 2012?

That thing goes for €10 used here.

15 for DA2.

It's amazing what reading the article can do.

"It’s unlikely Collins is the only person who has dreamed of suing GameStop, but on March 23, 2010, Collins made the step that most people don’t: he lawyered up and filed a class action lawsuit against the Texas-based retailer."

Posted by mrcraggle

@drsalvador: I find myself in this very same situation. While I'll walk into a game store, I'm usually mortified by the prices compared to online and walk out within a couple of minutes. At the beginning of this console generation my dad picked up an Xbox 360 and I wasn't too interested at the time and we didn't know what games to get for it so for the first time we picked up some used games. They were in great condition and really cheap compared to new (got Oblivion for half the price only a few weeks after release). I should note that I bought these at Game Station who were later bought by GAME and then all of a sudden their trade in prices went to shit and were only £5 cheaper nor could they guarantee if a code had been used as I argued with a Game Station store owner over a special edition copy of Mass Effect 2 where his answer was "you never know."

I felt bad for GAME going out of business but mostly for the people who were gonna lose their jobs but now they're fine again, I just wanna say FUCK GAME. 45 quid for Uncharted on Vita! Not that I own one (yet) but that's an absolute outrage. Hand held games should never, ever cost more than a console game and you can see why they were in so much trouble with prices like that.

Posted by Draxyle

I'm really not sure which side to be miffed at more. Gamestop for not being transparent on the issue, or the publishers that force this situation in the first place with DLC and online passes.

The whole situation is just really.. weird.

Edited by YetiAntics

So let me get this straight. Some idiot thought he could get the DLC that gets packed into a new game by buying it used, throwing a fit, sued Gamestop, and won due to his stupidity?

Jesus christ, I know better than to expect a pack-in DLC code from a USED game.

Apology in advance for having sympathy for the devil (Gamestop) here. But this dude must have lacked some serious common sense.

Now if this were a "NEW" game however, and one of these so called gutted copies had no DLC code given to him, then I would completely understand the lawsuit.

Posted by Bubbly

It is cool that they are doing this, but his case was a perfect example of why you should try your best to be an informed consumer and actually do some research on the stuff you are going to buy. In the grand scheme of things $60 isn't that much money, but that does not mean that you should just waste it and go buying things at that price without the tiniest bit of research. I don't wanna discredit the results of this as it has resulted in a positive outcome, but a little research truly goes a long way, folks.

Posted by RoujinX
Posted by MordeaniisChaos

This is kinda bullshit. All they should have to do is put a sign saying "Hey, project 10 dollar, here's what it is" next to the counter. Beyond that it's the publisher's job to put something on the box to make it clear what is and isn't included in a used copy.

Posted by Dezztroy
@MordeaniisChaos said:

This is kinda bullshit. All they should have to do is put a sign saying "Hey, project 10 dollar, here's what it is" next to the counter. Beyond that it's the publisher's job to put something on the box to make it clear what is and isn't included in a used copy.

Why? It's not the publisher selling you a used copy. Publishers don't want used copies being sold at all. If Gamestop wants to run this business of their own, of course they should have to take full responsibility over the products they sell. They're selling their own products, not the products of the publisher.
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