Giant Bomb News

100 Comments

The Walking Dead's Faces of Death, Part 3

Telltalle Games breaks down the major deaths in Long Road Ahead, the surprising ways players reacted, and the conversations that shaped their decisions.

(If you have not played The Walking Dead up through episode three, do not read this. Spoilers abound!)

We’re now more than halfway through what’s hopefully the first of many seasons for The Walking Dead from Telltale Games, but even if this is the only season we ever get, it’s been a hell of a memorable one so far.

It’s been a few weeks since we spoke with Telltale about the series, in which we talked about the moments in each episode where the player is handed a decision about the death of a character. There are plenty of other weight decisions in The Walking Dead, but the moments where a life hangs in the balance tend to be ones that stick around.

With the Gary Whitta-penned episode four, Around Every Corner, not far off (no, I don’t know when, but it’s very soon), it seemed like the right time to sit down with Telltale to reflect on episode three, Long Road Ahead.

That moment with Duck is starting to come back to you now, right? Damn. Damn.

I recently chatted with project lead Jake Rodkin (co-project lead Sean Vanaman was busy with a recording session), designer Harrison Pink, and director Eric Parsons about those moments and more. The team has taken great joy in watching YouTube playthroughs of the last episode, especially when players are confronted with Carley’s death.

The panel for The Walking Dead was one of the most popular events at PAX back in August.

“Whenever a new one of those comes out,” said Rodkin, “it immediately gets sent [around] and you can see it on everyone’s computer. ‘We got another one!’ We take a fair amount of thrill watching people who are hit as hard by that one, by the deaths that are going on in this game.”

The tonal shift between episode two and three is significant. Episode two is akin to a horror film, with our heroes pitted against a suspicious foe that turns against them. In episode three, the team didn’t want to release the tension, but focused on pressing a different set of buttons. The player had much less control over who lives and died, and instead had another set of challenges.

“Arcs are beginning and ending all throughout the series,” said Pink. “[With episode three], it’s the episode where many arcs ended and some arcs began. It was a conscious decision to say ‘alright, in this episode, you won’t get any control over any of that stuff.’ But the idea that a lot of these things in world are out of Lee and the player’s control and this is just how the world is is a conscious decision for sure.”

It’s also an episode where early design decisions made became more entrenched. The Walking Dead often allows players to say nothing, usually represented with an ellipses (“...”) as a dialogue choice. When asked to make a decision about the future with Clementine, 4% of people were totally silent.

“In three, I consistently had people coming up to me and say this was the first time they just really didn’t know what to say,” said Pink. “Especially with Clementine, when she asks these really difficult things about what’s going on in the world or what we’re going to do and all sorts of stuff like that.”

One moment of Telltale catering to the whims of passive players was a moment where the player, as Lee, could choose to be engage in a fight with Kenny aboard the train. Then, for whatever reason, they could also back down. The sequence Rodkin describes next never happened to me, and, for a while, I thought he was joking.

“When you’re in the train car with Kenny and he’s trying to get you to fight him,” said Rodkin, “if you just dilly-dally and don’t confront Kenny and you just keep trying to play it down the middle, he eventually throws you out of the engine cab and back out onto the walkway. When you go back into the box car, you realize you’ve spent so long doing jack shit with Kenny that Duck has already died, turned, and killed everyone in the train, and kills you. Apparently it’s referred to as the Duckpocalypse.”

I’ll have to go back and try that, but that’s for another day. Let’s kick things off with the episode’s first big decision.

GB: When the episode opens, the first one you’re presented with is a fairly classic horror trope of “do you let this girl continue to scream and distract the zombies while you loot and plunder, or do you take her out?” This one actually ended up 60/40, so while not 50/50. The vibe I got from it was the game telling me “you should just leave here. C’mon, she’s gonna die anyway.” I’m curious how much of that was my own projection.

Rodkin: For me, I actually always got the opposite read.

Pink: Yeah, Kenny tells you to leave her.

Rodkin: At that point, especially when we were working on episode three, I had just come off of working on episode two, and kind of had gotten tired of Kenny. Kenny telling me to leave her personally made me want to say “go fuck yourself.” I don’t know if that was the intent or not in that scene, but me personally, I was feeling a little overexposed on Kenny, so him telling me to do anything made me mad at him. For us, it was a little bit of--if you put a video game crosshair on top of a character in a video game and give you a shoot button, how many people aren’t going to shoot? We’ve thought about it in terms of the dog who’s trained to sit there salivating while there’s a bone resting on its nose, and that didn’t quite play out in that way as much as we thought. It’s probably good. I think we thought everyone would shoot that girl.

Parsons: The balance we were hoping for was the instinct to pull the trigger when there’s a crosshair on a person’s head versus somebody behind you yelling “don’t do it, don’t do it, don’t do it!” I guess it got sort of close.

Pink: I remember it being somewhat different way earlier. I think it was this exact point of “if you give someone a gun, they’re going to want to shoot it in a video game.” And making sure that didn’t seem like the right [choice]. Obviously, we don’t want there to be a right or a wrong choice, but what is it that the don’t shoot her choice means? What does it mean to Lee? What does it mean to the player? We definitely sat and spun on how to make sure the not shoot her [option] actually felt like a real choice, and it wasn’t just Kenny going “don’t do it! That’s a bad thing to do! You should let her escape!” but making Kenny more pragmatic. ”If we leave her alive, this is what it will mean to us, this is what it’ll to our survival. It’s better for our survival.” But, then, Lee sort of being the more emotional side. “Well, we should put her out of her misery.” It’s the emotional versus pragmatic, which always leads to really interesting choices.

GB: When these moral quandaries come up, it seems the game’s very deliberate to make sure the characters aren’t by themselves, they’re always with someone else. It seems to serve a dual purpose. A, it’s more interesting when there are more opinions. B, it allows you guys, as designers and writers, to voice both viewpoint the player finds themselves presented with. If it was just Lee trying to figure out if he should shoot that girl, it wouldn’t be nearly as compelling if there wasn’t Kenny to the side.

Rodkin: I think if we get to a point where Lee’s going back-and-forth with himself, the game might have gone to a weird place.

In this situation, 60% of players took the shot, while the other 40% allowed her to keep living.

Rodkin: I don’t remember where I read this, but it was about stores that started putting a picture of a set of eyes on the front of all their cash registers, and they noticed it reduced shoplifting.

Pink, Parsons: [laughs]

Rodkin: People act differently when they think they’re being watched, and that’s really interesting. Especially with some of the stuff we’re doing in episode four, it’s come up a lot, actually, in meetings and reviews for these things. When is someone watching you? When are you acting alone? It’s a thing that we ask ourselves a lot across these different situations of “how is the player going to feel in the game if someone is standing over their shoulder watching them do this?” versus “are they thinking there’s no one there and they’re going to get a way with it?”

In episode two, we talked about that when you kill that brother with a pitchfork, and the camera suddenly whips over and shows Clementine watching you. People feel so differently about it when they think they’re alone in the barn versus someone is there who matters.

Pink: That guilt shift is really interesting to see. Now, everyone is really paranoid that Clementine is sneaking through to watch them. Playing through episode three, there were tons of decisions where [you go] “if I’m alone, I’ll pick this, but I don’t know if Clementine is going to whip around and show me Clementine again, so I have to consider if she’s sulking in the shadows watching me do this stuff.” It’s really interesting. Even if she’s not, even the threat--well, threat is the wrong word to use. Even the idea that she could be nearby and observing this, even if the camera’s not showing it, really makes people second guess. “This the right decision for now, but I don’t want Clementine to see it, so what does it mean to Lee and me?”

GB: The second major moment is when you have the unfolding conflict between Carley, Lily, and Ben--or Doug, depending on your decisions. The shock value of that moment is pretty incredible. I turned off the notifications that tell you when a character is impacted by a decision, but I was watching the different YouTube playthroughs, and realized the game says, just before Carley gets shot, “Carley will remember that.” Then you fucking kill her! I have to imagine that was a very deliberate choice to have one last sleight of hand.

Everyone: [laughs]

Rodkin: That was kind of choice notification trolling on our part for sure. I didn’t know that was there because I also don’t often play with choice notifications on, but I was really happy. I thought that was a really good use of that system to pacify people for a half-second longer than they might have otherwise been because it goes against what was going on. It’s the weird game UI version of the Joss Whedon thing where he puts a character in the credits of Buffy the Vampire Slayer two episodes before they die.

Pink: I remember putting that in. Even with Katjaa, the stuff with her and giving her water for Duck, it says “she’ll remember that” and she’ll appreciate your kindness. I thought it would be really weird [to not have it]. It’s such an emotionally charged moment. To not be getting feedback that people are remembering would just feel dead and weird and suspicious. I don’t think I put that in there to troll everyone. I felt that if I didn’t know what the story was going to go, this is where I would put in a choice notification with Carley remembering stuff, so I tried to play it that I was ignorant of what was going to happen after 10 seconds of gameplay. You just said something really mean to Carley, and and she goes “What the fuck, Lee?” That’s true, Carley is going to remember that. I don’t think it was a “ha ha, I’m going to get the player with this!” but a thing where you’ve built the player to expect these notifications to pop up, and what that’s going to mean going into further episodes. I don’t think that was the original intent, but I’m glad that it shook out like that.

Rodkin: I’m actually really glad that it went in there. I feel like act one of the game, for people who know how these sorts of stories work, when Duck suddenly becomes a wacky crime investigator and Carley plants a kiss on your cheek, if you know what’s going on, you know these characters are going to eat it by the end of the episode because they just became nice to me. I like that the choice notification, for a lot of people, was maybe the moment where their initial suspicion was gonna be proven true.

Pink: I wonder if that’s where people all thought they could save Carley. Everyone at PAX came up to us and said “seriously, though, how do you save Carley?” Maybe that helped [make people think] “there’s gotta be a way to save her, there’s gotta be!”

45% of players abandoned Lily after she took a shot at Carley, while 55% brought her along.

GB: I was reading through the comments section of an IGN story, and there was this really long discussion over “well, they wouldn’t have put that in there unless there was some combination of dialogue choices to save her.”

Rodkin: Yes. [laughs]

GB: Another thing that struck me as interesting was how the game plays with the time mechanic. If you dilly-dally on making a choice, the game will either make a choice for you due to a timer or it’ll happen in the background as a way of surprising you. That’s what ended up getting me in the moment with Carley. I was immediately convinced that “oh, if I’d just done this a different way, I would have saved her.” Because I chose to be indifferent, this was a moment where the game said “go fuck yourself, you chose to not take a side, so we’re going to choose one for you.”

Rodkin: The Carley choice is definitely a choice where Carley--or Doug, if Doug’s alive in your playthrough--is a pretty heavy fixed point in the story. It’s a place where we had this trade-off of the mechanics of “do we support a character alive for a while, or is is more interesting to us to say Carley or Doug dead is a fixed point in the story because what’s interesting is using that as the mechanism to put the characters into a new and interesting place and move everything forward.” I’m having trouble phrasing what I’m trying to say.

GB: What happens after this, and as the setup for Duck becomes pretty obvious, you’re basically pressing reset on a lot of these characters. A bunch of the hangups they’ve had for the last two episodes no longer exist, and you can make this clean break to a new characters, new sets of challenges.

Rodkin: It’s safe to say that their short-term effects maybe had a reset hit, but I don’t think we’re wiping the slate on characters, even if it seems that way. In the course of episode three, everybody gets a pretty heavy jolt because of what happens, but over the rest of the season, a lot of that stuff--characters have time to deal with it in the context of everything else that’s happened. It may feel like in the short term that these guys got knocked pretty hard, but that’s not to say what happened earlier isn’t going to come to bear on the story later on.

For us, with Carley, we knew it was going to be a fixed point in the story, but we went out of our way, or at least tried very hard, to make sure that even though that point was going to be the same--Carley was always going to get a bullet in her head--the things that you did and the things that you said leading up to it really make that feel unique to you. Like you said, “I felt like because I was indifferent, Carley got shot.” I know that you can, then, rewind and find out “oh, because you did it a different way, Carley got shot,” we still want to make sure that moment tightens itself up around the choices that you’ve made and the way you’ve been playing so that when you get to that moment, it still feels like it’s your own, even though Carley will always eat it. She probably had it coming, not matter what!

GB: Even though my indifference made me feel like I had sacrificed Carley, my indifference continued because I refused to leave Lily on the side of the road. It felt like the game, then, was deliberately saying “well, if you’re going to continue to be indifferent, we’re going to let this bite you in the ass again because she’s going to take your van.” It’s a situation where, yeah, I can go back and look at how it can play out, but of my own playstyle, at least in the very moment, it feels real.

Rodkin: That’s very much the way we think about it when we make these. Given that we know there are some things that are going to happen no matter what, we want it to feel like “if the player did this and this and this, what is it going to mean when this happens?” Even within those fixed points, when the characters actually discuss them and contextualize them in the game, you would probably find them surprisingly different in a few places. Even though the big events don’t change, all of the flavor around them is [different]. We thought to ourselves “what would Patrick Klepek do?”

GB: As most good game developers do.

Rodkin: We tried to write just to you! But, hopefully, I could be doing this interview with a lot of different people and use that same joke and it would work.

Everyone: [laughs]

GB: I’m going to start going through every interview you’ve done in the last six months.

Rodkin: I’m going to blow your mind in episode five when Clementine turns to the screen and says “Hello, Patrick.”

Everyone: [laughs]

GB: The way the last big moment plays out is not telegraphed, but the moment Duck starts to get sick, you know where this is going. You’re not sure if this is going to play out in this episode, but you know things are going to go bad, decisions are going to have to be made. I’m curious how you guys figured to tip your hand on Duck being sick. From that point, it gets the player mind rolling in a certain direction.

Rodkin: We’ve known since before we wrote a single line of dialogue in episode one that Duck was going to get bit and die within episode three. That was one of the really, really early pieces that we had. Episode two’s lynchpin moment that we knew was there from day one was Larry getting his head bashed in a meat locker, and we knew that episode three was going to be all about everyone being super bummed and, over the course of the episode, Duck was dying. As far as within the specifics of episode three, I don’t really remember when we started figuring that out.

Pink: Honestly, the way that played out was pretty fluid. Not all the way to the end, we locked it down at some point, but there was a time [where] the amount of time that passes between the initial bite and the discovery of the bite to the group and, obviously, the event in the clearing when you have to make the decision--how all this played out was fluid, making sure it had its own place in the story. We didn’t want it to be Carley got shot in the head, oh man! Duck got bit, oh man! We definitely wanted to make sure each of those events could emotionally wrap up, and give time for Lee and the player to digest them and go “holy crap” before we smacked them over the head with another insane thing. We definitely moved them around to make sure each important thing had its due. It took a while to get right.

Parsons: It also didn’t change all that much. All those pieces were pretty well established.

Rodkin: We knew we wanted all those things to happen, but the order of...Duck gets bit, then the RV breaks down, then you discover the train, then Duck gets killed.

Parsons: I think there’s post-it notes shuffled around somewhere. [laughs]

Rodkin: When is Duck bit? And how do we present that so that it’s feels it’s something that starts pressing on your mind, but isn’t an immediate emergency, so it still feels like it’s okay for Lily to have her crazy breakdown and shoot someone. And it also feels okay to wander around and get a train going, and only once you’re on the train does Duck take his final turn. Having that order of events...we freaked out about that quite a lot over the course of development, and there were probably earlier story structures where it was just deal with Duck then deal with Lily or deal with Lily then deal with Duck. Getting all that stuff interwoven was actually a fair amount of story juggling.

Pink: We definitely had a discussion about how we allow the player to wander around a broken train while Duck is dying and feel okay. [laughs] That was definitely several days worth of a conversation.

81% of players took the gun into their own hands, while 19% of them made Kenny pull the trigger.

GB: In terms of the actual moment, where the player can choose to take care of Duck for Kenny, was it always the intent that the player would have control over a reticule?

Rodkin: The short answer to that is no. Duck’s death is actually a scene [that] we knew from the beginning was going to be the biggest moment in the episode, or, at least, was the one we had been thinking about the longest. Actually, because of that, it meant for a really long time, it had a tendency, as a lot of moments that have been around for a long time do, to just become auto-piloted. It existed unchanged in design for almost a year. We started the story for this a ways before episode one, and it wasn’t actually until we started getting the game built we realized Lee, as a completely passive observer, was not actually all that interesting.

Pink: Originally, you do pretty much the same thing, but once they go off, you just hear it happen. Obviously, the discussions you had were mostly the same, but once the actual event happens, it was very much [that] Lee wasn’t a part of it at all.

GB: It’s handed off to a cutscene, and the player just implies everything else.

Pink: That’s how it was for a long time.

Parsons: It was also a lot more vague. Katjaa and Duck walk out into the woods, and you hear a gunshot and nothing happens for a second, and then zombie Duck walks back out.

Rodkin: That was it!

Parsons: And then Kenny gets sad and everyone gets back on the train, and that was the end of the scene. The two big critiques, now very rightfully so, were that “wow, that was way too vague, and the player has nothing to do in this scene.” So all the stuff about making the first decision of who is going to go out and do this, and the second decision about who has the gun in their hands, all came relatively late compared to the knowledge that Duck was going to die.

Rodkin: That’s a pretty good example of [where] we knew that story moment was there from day one, but how it actually plays out in detail got pretty heavily shuffled around. We’re pretty happy with how that turned out, but it’s a pretty big overhaul from what was originally just a sad cutscene moment, where you could talk to Clementine a little bit, and then Kenny cried.

GB: When I was presented with the reticule, it wasn’t as easy as “oh, okay, I guess I’ll just pull this trigger.” It was a lot different than the axe moment, where a lot of people were like “oh, hell yeah, I’m gonna chop that leg off!” At least if you’re taking the game semi-seriously, this is a moment of pause. I played the game co-op with my wife, and we sat there for a while thinking, “well, maybe if we wait long enough, he’ll turn into a zombie and we’ll feel less bad if he’s attacking us. Otherwise, yeah, he’s getting sick, but he hasn’t undergone the transformation into this evil creature.”

Rodkin: That’s actually a detail that we also talked about and went back-and-forth on a lot. Where we ended up settling was that we thought about letting Duck go to the point that he turns, but that actually came off as “can’t we spare players and let Duck turn?” And the answer is no because you’ll feel less bad because you’re killing a zombie. Where we ended up landing was that if you do wait long enough, Duck stops breathing. When he stops breathing, you still get a second to pull the trigger if you want, but if you wait too much longer, they just say “we can’t do it,” and leave, which very few people did. And then no one shoots Duck.

GB: When I was looking at the stats, it only has Lee shooting Duck or Kenny shooting Duck, and didn’t realize there was another option.

Rodkin: It’s another one where there’s a very small percentage of people who do it, but the game does support it. If you wait long enough, either Kenny or Lee says “let’s just go,” with Duck just laying there versus zombie Duck, who is now amassing a horde of zombies on his quest for world domination.

Pink: There’s a lot of people who say “I don’t like this character, I’m not going to feel bad when he goes” and to the extent of “I can’t wait to kill that kid!” But when you actually put a gun in someone’s hand and you’ve said “Kenny, I’ll do it,” a lot of people that I spoke to said “I was ‘no problem, I can handle this’ until the reticule came up and I went ‘whoa, this feels a lot different than I thought it would.’” Or they would shoot, and then walk away saying that, either right before or right after. “I thought I was totally okay doing that, but actually being presented with the reticule and this little sad boy’s face, I thought it would feel like a video game, and I felt not the way I thought I would about that.” That was always really interesting to hear.

Rodkin: I’m sure there’s always a silent contingent somewhere that doesn’t mind blowing away Duck’s face, but we hear pretty often from the people who have suspension of disbelief going on to the point that it actually matters that they’re pointing a gun at this little kid. It’s kind of cool.

Parsons: I got more confident about my ability to execute this scene after hearing feedback from episode two. The people that in episode one who said “oh, man, Larry, the first chance I get, I’m taking that guy out,” and when episode two rolls around [they said] “oh, man, I couldn’t do that.” Hearing that, I was like “okay, I think Duck’s safe.”

Patrick Klepek on Google+
100 Comments
  • 100 results
  • 1
  • 2
Posted by patrickklepek

(If you have not played The Walking Dead up through episode three, do not read this. Spoilers abound!)

We’re now more than halfway through what’s hopefully the first of many seasons for The Walking Dead from Telltale Games, but even if this is the only season we ever get, it’s been a hell of a memorable one so far.

It’s been a few weeks since we spoke with Telltale about the series, in which we talked about the moments in each episode where the player is handed a decision about the death of a character. There are plenty of other weight decisions in The Walking Dead, but the moments where a life hangs in the balance tend to be ones that stick around.

With the Gary Whitta-penned episode four, Around Every Corner, not far off (no, I don’t know when, but it’s very soon), it seemed like the right time to sit down with Telltale to reflect on episode three, Long Road Ahead.

That moment with Duck is starting to come back to you now, right? Damn. Damn.

I recently chatted with project lead Jake Rodkin (co-project lead Sean Vanaman was busy with a recording session), designer Harrison Pink, and director Eric Parsons about those moments and more. The team has taken great joy in watching YouTube playthroughs of the last episode, especially when players are confronted with Carley’s death.

The panel for The Walking Dead was one of the most popular events at PAX back in August.

“Whenever a new one of those comes out,” said Rodkin, “it immediately gets sent [around] and you can see it on everyone’s computer. ‘We got another one!’ We take a fair amount of thrill watching people who are hit as hard by that one, by the deaths that are going on in this game.”

The tonal shift between episode two and three is significant. Episode two is akin to a horror film, with our heroes pitted against a suspicious foe that turns against them. In episode three, the team didn’t want to release the tension, but focused on pressing a different set of buttons. The player had much less control over who lives and died, and instead had another set of challenges.

“Arcs are beginning and ending all throughout the series,” said Pink. “[With episode three], it’s the episode where many arcs ended and some arcs began. It was a conscious decision to say ‘alright, in this episode, you won’t get any control over any of that stuff.’ But the idea that a lot of these things in world are out of Lee and the player’s control and this is just how the world is is a conscious decision for sure.”

It’s also an episode where early design decisions made became more entrenched. The Walking Dead often allows players to say nothing, usually represented with an ellipses (“...”) as a dialogue choice. When asked to make a decision about the future with Clementine, 4% of people were totally silent.

“In three, I consistently had people coming up to me and say this was the first time they just really didn’t know what to say,” said Pink. “Especially with Clementine, when she asks these really difficult things about what’s going on in the world or what we’re going to do and all sorts of stuff like that.”

One moment of Telltale catering to the whims of passive players was a moment where the player, as Lee, could choose to be engage in a fight with Kenny aboard the train. Then, for whatever reason, they could also back down. The sequence Rodkin describes next never happened to me, and, for a while, I thought he was joking.

“When you’re in the train car with Kenny and he’s trying to get you to fight him,” said Rodkin, “if you just dilly-dally and don’t confront Kenny and you just keep trying to play it down the middle, he eventually throws you out of the engine cab and back out onto the walkway. When you go back into the box car, you realize you’ve spent so long doing jack shit with Kenny that Duck has already died, turned, and killed everyone in the train, and kills you. Apparently it’s referred to as the Duckpocalypse.”

I’ll have to go back and try that, but that’s for another day. Let’s kick things off with the episode’s first big decision.

GB: When the episode opens, the first one you’re presented with is a fairly classic horror trope of “do you let this girl continue to scream and distract the zombies while you loot and plunder, or do you take her out?” This one actually ended up 60/40, so while not 50/50. The vibe I got from it was the game telling me “you should just leave here. C’mon, she’s gonna die anyway.” I’m curious how much of that was my own projection.

Rodkin: For me, I actually always got the opposite read.

Pink: Yeah, Kenny tells you to leave her.

Rodkin: At that point, especially when we were working on episode three, I had just come off of working on episode two, and kind of had gotten tired of Kenny. Kenny telling me to leave her personally made me want to say “go fuck yourself.” I don’t know if that was the intent or not in that scene, but me personally, I was feeling a little overexposed on Kenny, so him telling me to do anything made me mad at him. For us, it was a little bit of--if you put a video game crosshair on top of a character in a video game and give you a shoot button, how many people aren’t going to shoot? We’ve thought about it in terms of the dog who’s trained to sit there salivating while there’s a bone resting on its nose, and that didn’t quite play out in that way as much as we thought. It’s probably good. I think we thought everyone would shoot that girl.

Parsons: The balance we were hoping for was the instinct to pull the trigger when there’s a crosshair on a person’s head versus somebody behind you yelling “don’t do it, don’t do it, don’t do it!” I guess it got sort of close.

Pink: I remember it being somewhat different way earlier. I think it was this exact point of “if you give someone a gun, they’re going to want to shoot it in a video game.” And making sure that didn’t seem like the right [choice]. Obviously, we don’t want there to be a right or a wrong choice, but what is it that the don’t shoot her choice means? What does it mean to Lee? What does it mean to the player? We definitely sat and spun on how to make sure the not shoot her [option] actually felt like a real choice, and it wasn’t just Kenny going “don’t do it! That’s a bad thing to do! You should let her escape!” but making Kenny more pragmatic. ”If we leave her alive, this is what it will mean to us, this is what it’ll to our survival. It’s better for our survival.” But, then, Lee sort of being the more emotional side. “Well, we should put her out of her misery.” It’s the emotional versus pragmatic, which always leads to really interesting choices.

GB: When these moral quandaries come up, it seems the game’s very deliberate to make sure the characters aren’t by themselves, they’re always with someone else. It seems to serve a dual purpose. A, it’s more interesting when there are more opinions. B, it allows you guys, as designers and writers, to voice both viewpoint the player finds themselves presented with. If it was just Lee trying to figure out if he should shoot that girl, it wouldn’t be nearly as compelling if there wasn’t Kenny to the side.

Rodkin: I think if we get to a point where Lee’s going back-and-forth with himself, the game might have gone to a weird place.

In this situation, 60% of players took the shot, while the other 40% allowed her to keep living.

Rodkin: I don’t remember where I read this, but it was about stores that started putting a picture of a set of eyes on the front of all their cash registers, and they noticed it reduced shoplifting.

Pink, Parsons: [laughs]

Rodkin: People act differently when they think they’re being watched, and that’s really interesting. Especially with some of the stuff we’re doing in episode four, it’s come up a lot, actually, in meetings and reviews for these things. When is someone watching you? When are you acting alone? It’s a thing that we ask ourselves a lot across these different situations of “how is the player going to feel in the game if someone is standing over their shoulder watching them do this?” versus “are they thinking there’s no one there and they’re going to get a way with it?”

In episode two, we talked about that when you kill that brother with a pitchfork, and the camera suddenly whips over and shows Clementine watching you. People feel so differently about it when they think they’re alone in the barn versus someone is there who matters.

Pink: That guilt shift is really interesting to see. Now, everyone is really paranoid that Clementine is sneaking through to watch them. Playing through episode three, there were tons of decisions where [you go] “if I’m alone, I’ll pick this, but I don’t know if Clementine is going to whip around and show me Clementine again, so I have to consider if she’s sulking in the shadows watching me do this stuff.” It’s really interesting. Even if she’s not, even the threat--well, threat is the wrong word to use. Even the idea that she could be nearby and observing this, even if the camera’s not showing it, really makes people second guess. “This the right decision for now, but I don’t want Clementine to see it, so what does it mean to Lee and me?”

GB: The second major moment is when you have the unfolding conflict between Carley, Lily, and Ben--or Doug, depending on your decisions. The shock value of that moment is pretty incredible. I turned off the notifications that tell you when a character is impacted by a decision, but I was watching the different YouTube playthroughs, and realized the game says, just before Carley gets shot, “Carley will remember that.” Then you fucking kill her! I have to imagine that was a very deliberate choice to have one last sleight of hand.

Everyone: [laughs]

Rodkin: That was kind of choice notification trolling on our part for sure. I didn’t know that was there because I also don’t often play with choice notifications on, but I was really happy. I thought that was a really good use of that system to pacify people for a half-second longer than they might have otherwise been because it goes against what was going on. It’s the weird game UI version of the Joss Whedon thing where he puts a character in the credits of Buffy the Vampire Slayer two episodes before they die.

Pink: I remember putting that in. Even with Katjaa, the stuff with her and giving her water for Duck, it says “she’ll remember that” and she’ll appreciate your kindness. I thought it would be really weird [to not have it]. It’s such an emotionally charged moment. To not be getting feedback that people are remembering would just feel dead and weird and suspicious. I don’t think I put that in there to troll everyone. I felt that if I didn’t know what the story was going to go, this is where I would put in a choice notification with Carley remembering stuff, so I tried to play it that I was ignorant of what was going to happen after 10 seconds of gameplay. You just said something really mean to Carley, and and she goes “What the fuck, Lee?” That’s true, Carley is going to remember that. I don’t think it was a “ha ha, I’m going to get the player with this!” but a thing where you’ve built the player to expect these notifications to pop up, and what that’s going to mean going into further episodes. I don’t think that was the original intent, but I’m glad that it shook out like that.

Rodkin: I’m actually really glad that it went in there. I feel like act one of the game, for people who know how these sorts of stories work, when Duck suddenly becomes a wacky crime investigator and Carley plants a kiss on your cheek, if you know what’s going on, you know these characters are going to eat it by the end of the episode because they just became nice to me. I like that the choice notification, for a lot of people, was maybe the moment where their initial suspicion was gonna be proven true.

Pink: I wonder if that’s where people all thought they could save Carley. Everyone at PAX came up to us and said “seriously, though, how do you save Carley?” Maybe that helped [make people think] “there’s gotta be a way to save her, there’s gotta be!”

45% of players abandoned Lily after she took a shot at Carley, while 55% brought her along.

GB: I was reading through the comments section of an IGN story, and there was this really long discussion over “well, they wouldn’t have put that in there unless there was some combination of dialogue choices to save her.”

Rodkin: Yes. [laughs]

GB: Another thing that struck me as interesting was how the game plays with the time mechanic. If you dilly-dally on making a choice, the game will either make a choice for you due to a timer or it’ll happen in the background as a way of surprising you. That’s what ended up getting me in the moment with Carley. I was immediately convinced that “oh, if I’d just done this a different way, I would have saved her.” Because I chose to be indifferent, this was a moment where the game said “go fuck yourself, you chose to not take a side, so we’re going to choose one for you.”

Rodkin: The Carley choice is definitely a choice where Carley--or Doug, if Doug’s alive in your playthrough--is a pretty heavy fixed point in the story. It’s a place where we had this trade-off of the mechanics of “do we support a character alive for a while, or is is more interesting to us to say Carley or Doug dead is a fixed point in the story because what’s interesting is using that as the mechanism to put the characters into a new and interesting place and move everything forward.” I’m having trouble phrasing what I’m trying to say.

GB: What happens after this, and as the setup for Duck becomes pretty obvious, you’re basically pressing reset on a lot of these characters. A bunch of the hangups they’ve had for the last two episodes no longer exist, and you can make this clean break to a new characters, new sets of challenges.

Rodkin: It’s safe to say that their short-term effects maybe had a reset hit, but I don’t think we’re wiping the slate on characters, even if it seems that way. In the course of episode three, everybody gets a pretty heavy jolt because of what happens, but over the rest of the season, a lot of that stuff--characters have time to deal with it in the context of everything else that’s happened. It may feel like in the short term that these guys got knocked pretty hard, but that’s not to say what happened earlier isn’t going to come to bear on the story later on.

For us, with Carley, we knew it was going to be a fixed point in the story, but we went out of our way, or at least tried very hard, to make sure that even though that point was going to be the same--Carley was always going to get a bullet in her head--the things that you did and the things that you said leading up to it really make that feel unique to you. Like you said, “I felt like because I was indifferent, Carley got shot.” I know that you can, then, rewind and find out “oh, because you did it a different way, Carley got shot,” we still want to make sure that moment tightens itself up around the choices that you’ve made and the way you’ve been playing so that when you get to that moment, it still feels like it’s your own, even though Carley will always eat it. She probably had it coming, not matter what!

GB: Even though my indifference made me feel like I had sacrificed Carley, my indifference continued because I refused to leave Lily on the side of the road. It felt like the game, then, was deliberately saying “well, if you’re going to continue to be indifferent, we’re going to let this bite you in the ass again because she’s going to take your van.” It’s a situation where, yeah, I can go back and look at how it can play out, but of my own playstyle, at least in the very moment, it feels real.

Rodkin: That’s very much the way we think about it when we make these. Given that we know there are some things that are going to happen no matter what, we want it to feel like “if the player did this and this and this, what is it going to mean when this happens?” Even within those fixed points, when the characters actually discuss them and contextualize them in the game, you would probably find them surprisingly different in a few places. Even though the big events don’t change, all of the flavor around them is [different]. We thought to ourselves “what would Patrick Klepek do?”

GB: As most good game developers do.

Rodkin: We tried to write just to you! But, hopefully, I could be doing this interview with a lot of different people and use that same joke and it would work.

Everyone: [laughs]

GB: I’m going to start going through every interview you’ve done in the last six months.

Rodkin: I’m going to blow your mind in episode five when Clementine turns to the screen and says “Hello, Patrick.”

Everyone: [laughs]

GB: The way the last big moment plays out is not telegraphed, but the moment Duck starts to get sick, you know where this is going. You’re not sure if this is going to play out in this episode, but you know things are going to go bad, decisions are going to have to be made. I’m curious how you guys figured to tip your hand on Duck being sick. From that point, it gets the player mind rolling in a certain direction.

Rodkin: We’ve known since before we wrote a single line of dialogue in episode one that Duck was going to get bit and die within episode three. That was one of the really, really early pieces that we had. Episode two’s lynchpin moment that we knew was there from day one was Larry getting his head bashed in a meat locker, and we knew that episode three was going to be all about everyone being super bummed and, over the course of the episode, Duck was dying. As far as within the specifics of episode three, I don’t really remember when we started figuring that out.

Pink: Honestly, the way that played out was pretty fluid. Not all the way to the end, we locked it down at some point, but there was a time [where] the amount of time that passes between the initial bite and the discovery of the bite to the group and, obviously, the event in the clearing when you have to make the decision--how all this played out was fluid, making sure it had its own place in the story. We didn’t want it to be Carley got shot in the head, oh man! Duck got bit, oh man! We definitely wanted to make sure each of those events could emotionally wrap up, and give time for Lee and the player to digest them and go “holy crap” before we smacked them over the head with another insane thing. We definitely moved them around to make sure each important thing had its due. It took a while to get right.

Parsons: It also didn’t change all that much. All those pieces were pretty well established.

Rodkin: We knew we wanted all those things to happen, but the order of...Duck gets bit, then the RV breaks down, then you discover the train, then Duck gets killed.

Parsons: I think there’s post-it notes shuffled around somewhere. [laughs]

Rodkin: When is Duck bit? And how do we present that so that it’s feels it’s something that starts pressing on your mind, but isn’t an immediate emergency, so it still feels like it’s okay for Lily to have her crazy breakdown and shoot someone. And it also feels okay to wander around and get a train going, and only once you’re on the train does Duck take his final turn. Having that order of events...we freaked out about that quite a lot over the course of development, and there were probably earlier story structures where it was just deal with Duck then deal with Lily or deal with Lily then deal with Duck. Getting all that stuff interwoven was actually a fair amount of story juggling.

Pink: We definitely had a discussion about how we allow the player to wander around a broken train while Duck is dying and feel okay. [laughs] That was definitely several days worth of a conversation.

81% of players took the gun into their own hands, while 19% of them made Kenny pull the trigger.

GB: In terms of the actual moment, where the player can choose to take care of Duck for Kenny, was it always the intent that the player would have control over a reticule?

Rodkin: The short answer to that is no. Duck’s death is actually a scene [that] we knew from the beginning was going to be the biggest moment in the episode, or, at least, was the one we had been thinking about the longest. Actually, because of that, it meant for a really long time, it had a tendency, as a lot of moments that have been around for a long time do, to just become auto-piloted. It existed unchanged in design for almost a year. We started the story for this a ways before episode one, and it wasn’t actually until we started getting the game built we realized Lee, as a completely passive observer, was not actually all that interesting.

Pink: Originally, you do pretty much the same thing, but once they go off, you just hear it happen. Obviously, the discussions you had were mostly the same, but once the actual event happens, it was very much [that] Lee wasn’t a part of it at all.

GB: It’s handed off to a cutscene, and the player just implies everything else.

Pink: That’s how it was for a long time.

Parsons: It was also a lot more vague. Katjaa and Duck walk out into the woods, and you hear a gunshot and nothing happens for a second, and then zombie Duck walks back out.

Rodkin: That was it!

Parsons: And then Kenny gets sad and everyone gets back on the train, and that was the end of the scene. The two big critiques, now very rightfully so, were that “wow, that was way too vague, and the player has nothing to do in this scene.” So all the stuff about making the first decision of who is going to go out and do this, and the second decision about who has the gun in their hands, all came relatively late compared to the knowledge that Duck was going to die.

Rodkin: That’s a pretty good example of [where] we knew that story moment was there from day one, but how it actually plays out in detail got pretty heavily shuffled around. We’re pretty happy with how that turned out, but it’s a pretty big overhaul from what was originally just a sad cutscene moment, where you could talk to Clementine a little bit, and then Kenny cried.

GB: When I was presented with the reticule, it wasn’t as easy as “oh, okay, I guess I’ll just pull this trigger.” It was a lot different than the axe moment, where a lot of people were like “oh, hell yeah, I’m gonna chop that leg off!” At least if you’re taking the game semi-seriously, this is a moment of pause. I played the game co-op with my wife, and we sat there for a while thinking, “well, maybe if we wait long enough, he’ll turn into a zombie and we’ll feel less bad if he’s attacking us. Otherwise, yeah, he’s getting sick, but he hasn’t undergone the transformation into this evil creature.”

Rodkin: That’s actually a detail that we also talked about and went back-and-forth on a lot. Where we ended up settling was that we thought about letting Duck go to the point that he turns, but that actually came off as “can’t we spare players and let Duck turn?” And the answer is no because you’ll feel less bad because you’re killing a zombie. Where we ended up landing was that if you do wait long enough, Duck stops breathing. When he stops breathing, you still get a second to pull the trigger if you want, but if you wait too much longer, they just say “we can’t do it,” and leave, which very few people did. And then no one shoots Duck.

GB: When I was looking at the stats, it only has Lee shooting Duck or Kenny shooting Duck, and didn’t realize there was another option.

Rodkin: It’s another one where there’s a very small percentage of people who do it, but the game does support it. If you wait long enough, either Kenny or Lee says “let’s just go,” with Duck just laying there versus zombie Duck, who is now amassing a horde of zombies on his quest for world domination.

Pink: There’s a lot of people who say “I don’t like this character, I’m not going to feel bad when he goes” and to the extent of “I can’t wait to kill that kid!” But when you actually put a gun in someone’s hand and you’ve said “Kenny, I’ll do it,” a lot of people that I spoke to said “I was ‘no problem, I can handle this’ until the reticule came up and I went ‘whoa, this feels a lot different than I thought it would.’” Or they would shoot, and then walk away saying that, either right before or right after. “I thought I was totally okay doing that, but actually being presented with the reticule and this little sad boy’s face, I thought it would feel like a video game, and I felt not the way I thought I would about that.” That was always really interesting to hear.

Rodkin: I’m sure there’s always a silent contingent somewhere that doesn’t mind blowing away Duck’s face, but we hear pretty often from the people who have suspension of disbelief going on to the point that it actually matters that they’re pointing a gun at this little kid. It’s kind of cool.

Parsons: I got more confident about my ability to execute this scene after hearing feedback from episode two. The people that in episode one who said “oh, man, Larry, the first chance I get, I’m taking that guy out,” and when episode two rolls around [they said] “oh, man, I couldn’t do that.” Hearing that, I was like “okay, I think Duck’s safe.”

Edited by Hameyadea

How many episodes are planned? 5? 6?

Posted by patrickklepek

@Hameyadea said:

How many episodes are planned? 5? 6?

5!

Posted by Encephalon

I NEED TO SEE THIS DUCKPOCALYPSE

Posted by RecSpec
@Encephalon said:

I NEED TO SEE THIS DUCKPOCALYPSE

Posted by HadesTimes

It's been SO long since I played episode 1. I think I'm just going to start over and play them all again.

Posted by MikeW1980UK

I would love the GB team to do a spoilercast once the season has wrapped. Reading these interviews gets Patricks view, but I would like to hear Vinny's, Brads' and Ryan's view.

Also, how great would it be to have another spilercast, we haven't had once for years.

Posted by crusader8463

Glad they had the balls to kill of Duck, but for some reason that whole episode didn't do anything for me. So far I recall enjoying my time with 2 the most with 1 and 3 just falling flat for me. Wish I could pin point what it was, but they just fell flat.

Posted by Rothbart

Three!

Posted by Milkman

Carley's death was the angriest I've ever been at a video game. And I love this game for that.

Posted by Foggen

I had Doug instead of Carley, and he died because he jumped in front of Ben when Lily fired at him. The whole dynamic shifts because Lily's shooting at a relative outsider and kills your most faithful companion by accident. It made it a lot harder to decide what to do with her than if she'd started an argument and murdered someone like Carley on purpose.

Posted by joshthebear
@patrickklepek Awesome work Patrick. This series of interviews has been my amazing to read.
Posted by Meepasaurus

I had 2 issues with the major decisions in episode 3, and I'm curious if other players were effected by them too...

1) For the girl in the opening scene, I tried to shoot the zombie that was about to grab her. I was perfectly lined up for a headshot, but this causes you to shoot the girl in the head instead. Totally freaked me out. :(

2) When picking who to help first for the train, how the heck is Omid running faster than Christa right after he broke his leg? I picked Christa because she was barely keeping up, but then she yells at me!

Anyhoo, I love this game and I'm looking forward to the last 2 episodes. Thanks for these articles, Patrick!

Posted by Hameyadea

@patrickklepek: Sweet, thanks for the reply.

Edited by Dberg

This will almost certainly get a second season. It's too good not to. The ramifications of that make me very curious to what they have in store for Lee and Clem though. I feel you can't have one without the other, but classic zombie stories would end with one of them dead.

Posted by Zollington

Not going to lie, my suspension of disbelief was so high that it didnt even cross my mind that Carly was going to die. I actually choked up after that scene.

Posted by Mo0man

Would it have been better if she shot Ben in the face?

Posted by nasseh

@Encephalon: It sounds fucking terrifying. I don't think I'd be able to stomach seeing Clementine dead.

Posted by OleMarthin

why would anyone bring Lily along after what she did, people are crazy:P can't wait for ep 4!

Posted by JamesJeux007

@patrickklepek: I love those interviews ! It's a great read everytime ! Can't wait for The Walking Dead Season 2 / Sam & Max crossover...

Online
Posted by Elwoodan

I really did feel as though Carly's death was due to my inaction, I actually had to stop playing for a bit at that point; I was so shocked and angry.

Posted by Olqavtoras

Great interview Patrick, can't wait to read part 4 & 5.

Posted by MildMolasses

What I found most depressing about this game was the scene shortly after Duck's death, where you cut Clem's hair and teach her how to shoot. I found it heartbreaking. I had just literally killed a child and now I was metaphorically killing another by forcing her into to be more grown up. If she hadn't been so well written and acted so that I could see how her implicit trust of Lee outweighed her hesitation, I don't think I would have been bothered at all. But I really hated having to do that to her

Posted by ipaqi

I actually felt really disappointed about the lack of cause-and-effect in episode 3. Regardless of the fact that I took a liking to Carley's character after episode 1, I think her death was really well done (I haven't had a playthrough with Doug).

But I was really disappointed at the fact that no decision I made actually mattered. The only choice that affected anything was who would kill Duck. Nothing else I did throughout the episode felt like it had any consequence, except maybe for training Clem, but that's just supposition, since they might just ignore it for the next episode, for all I know.

Overall, though this episode had some of the best story moments up to now, I still think it's the weakest of the series so far because of its lack of interactivity. The story here, sadly, hasn't been able to match a game like To The Moon for emotional involvement, and so its effectiveness lay mostly with its interactivity.

And this episode may as well have been on rails.

Posted by Phatmac

Poor Duck. :(

Posted by Ravelle

At the start of the game where you shoot the lady or have the option to, I thought " lets shoot at the zombie coming for her" but the game decided the shot was meant for her although it was a mile off.

Posted by The_Ruiner

@Milkman: dude I had my head in my hands at one point..controller on the floor just pissed off

Posted by joesson

I am not sure that 1 and 2 would have the same impact because of the fact that no matter what you do most of the people from one are dead or gone by the end of three. What incentive do I now have to back Lily over Kenny? I was fairly neutral but with the knowledge that no matter what I do she won't be around there is no reason to curry favor with her.

That being said, I like the fact that things can go really bad and the only way to do that is to make definitive choices on the developer end. It stifles long term replay-ability but it makes for a more interesting ride the first time through.

Posted by Buttonbasher

Good read. Noticed two typos though: "Playthrought" and "Rokin".

Posted by Driam

I was also really mad when Carley ate it, but I was mad at the developers for going the cheap route and killing off the two characters that were obviously going to get offed because "yo, voice actors are expensive". Kinda expected it after they made an excuse for Doug/Carley hardly being in ep. 2 but I was hoping they were serious in all their talk about the players' decisions meaning something.

Edited by tristenkw5

@Dberg: I'd love to see a couple years later where Clem takes over in Season 2, with Lee probably biting it at the end of this season. Or the first ep of the next one. Either way, no one seems to be able to live that long in this world, and having Lee live on much longer will work against making Lee feel like a character in the story instead of more as an invincible video game hero.

Posted by Tidel

I took a turn after Lily shot Carley. I felt... cold. Even if I could have, I wouldn't have shot her. Leave her. Leave her and let the world eat her.

Posted by Splid

If Clementine dies im crying my eyes out... I hated Duck with a passion.  
But this episode made me see him  as a child.  
And then there we are...in the woods.  
This game makes me feel bad and i love and respect it for it. I really just sat there starring at that damn reticule for a while. Partly in chock and partly in awe.  
 
This game is art!

Posted by Yorec

I love how Doug is a complete after thought in terms of important characters. Oh yeah Lilly, Carely, Ben and uh... was there somone else?

Nah just those important characters.

I admit Doug didn't really bring much to the table in terms of the overall story but he managed to scratch build a tripwire alarm system to warn of any bandits or zombies! I think that deserves some credit. And he had a laser pointer.

Posted by ExplodeMode

In ep3 I made a lot more non-decision and ellipsis choices. The vibe of the whole episode was confused exasperation.

Posted by Foggen

@Mo0man said:

Would it have been better if she shot Ben in the face?

That's an interesting thought. I think on a sub-rational level I'm more willing to consider the situation ambiguous when the damage she does is not the damage she intends. If she'd just straight up shot Ben I think I might have been more sure what to do with her. On the other hand, there was still a bit of ambiguity about Ben's role in the group. If she'd intentionally shot Doug, though, there would have been no way she got back on the RV. I felt way more loyalty to Doug than almost anyone else besides Clementine.

Posted by Shinmaru007

I thought Duck was an annoying little shit (except when you high five him, because that's hilarious), and even I was like, "Man, this is kinda fucked up" when you have to kill him.

Edited by IronJuJu

@OleMarthin said:

why would anyone bring Lily along after what she did, people are crazy:P can't wait for ep 4!

I brought Lily along because I felt that after she shared Lee's secret with the group that he was a murderer, would Lee be any better than her if he left her on the side of the road to die? Resorting to that type of behavior in a world without any structure seems like a fast way to lose one's humanity.

I thought this would be taking the high road, but it turned out to bite me in the butt in the end.

Posted by joetom

When I had to get Kenny to stop the train, I ended up fighting him, but never hit back. It results in him beating the shit out of you until he breaks down and stops the train. Pretty powerful moment for me.

Posted by Nightriff

Is there any way for Carly NOT to die?

Posted by Random45

@OleMarthin said:

why would anyone bring Lily along after what she did, people are crazy:P can't wait for ep 4!

I had Doug, and she doesn't intentionally kill him like she did Carley. Doug pushed Ben out of the way and got shot instead. Pissed me off, but not enough for me to boot one of the remaining useful members of the group. Wish Ben was the one who got shot though, Doug was one of the few people left I really trusted at all.

Posted by Random45

@Nightriff said:

Is there any way for Carly NOT to die?

Yeah, you got to do a lot of very specific conversation choices in episode 1 and 2 though, and then in the beginning of episode 3, when you talk to her, she will tell you, "Stop asking that god damn question. There is no way to save me."

Posted by Nightriff

@Random45 said:

@Nightriff said:

Is there any way for Carly NOT to die?

Yeah, you got to do a lot of very specific conversation choices in episode 1 and 2 though, and then in the beginning of episode 3, when you talk to her, she will tell you, "Stop asking that god damn question. There is no way to save me."

.....way more work to get a playthrough with her alive than I want, she can die in that case

Posted by myketuna

@MildMolasses said:

What I found most depressing about this game was the scene shortly after Duck's death, where you cut Clem's hair and teach her how to shoot. I found it heartbreaking. I had just literally killed a child and now I was metaphorically killing another by forcing her into to be more grown up. If she hadn't been so well written and acted so that I could see how her implicit trust of Lee outweighed her hesitation, I don't think I would have been bothered at all. But I really hated having to do that to her

I didn't see it that way, but I get what you mean now. I felt quite the opposite. As much as it truly is "making her grow up", I felt like I was doing something to get her ready for the world that is. Which is something I did kind of want out of Lee. I play "my" Lee that way anyway. I try to be very straightforward with her just because the way things are is forcing issues that would have come to light a lot later in life rush into focus now.

But again, I see your point.

Posted by Nightfang

@Phatmac said:

Poor Duck. :(

The kid was annoying and his stupidity got Shawn killed, but he shouldn't have died like that.

Posted by golguin

Can Duck seriously turn during the fight with Kenny? I had never heard of such a thing in the days after the release.

Posted by TheHT

It's also worth mentioning, that scene when Clem turns into a zombie had me freaking out.

Then to realize it's just a dream had me cursing Telltale Games like you wouldn't believe.

Posted by StarvingGamer
@Meepasaurus Well, when Omid doesn't make the jump Christa jumps off the train to help him and sprains her leg. Between the shock and adrenaline I can imagine that both wounds would be similarly hobbling for the first 30 seconds and Christa makes sure to get Omid going before she starts trying to catch up to the train herself. Personally I thought Christa was lagging behind because she was more worried about Omid and wanted to make sure he got on the train first. That's why I helped Omid because Christa looked like she could take care of herself.
Posted by Dtat

I'll be honest. I hated Duck. I was one of those people who said "this will be easy!" and guess what. It was! I really didn't like that character, and it still is just a video game. It's a game that has affected me emotionally, but just not in that moment.

Edited by TwoArmed

Interesting. Had no idea that you could actually wait long enough and not have to shoot Duck.

  • 100 results
  • 1
  • 2