Let's Talk About Assassin's Creed III and Assassin's Creed III: Liberation

  • 53 results
  • 1
  • 2
Posted by Alex (1973 posts) -

Ubisoft has made it a point to repeatedly describe Assassin's Creed III as "one of the most anticipated games of all-time." It's right there at the front of each of the publisher's behind-the-scenes looks at the game. I don't know what basis Ubisoft is using to make that claim--possibly they're examining pre-order numbers and making an educated guess--but regardless as to whether it's true, the publisher has done an excellent job marketing this latest Assassin's sequel as if it is. Assassin's Creed III was one of the stand-out demos at this year's E3, garnering all sorts of awards, mostly for its incredible visual presentation and seemingly fluid assassination gameplay.

I say seemingly only because most of us never actually got to put our hands on the game. Assassin's Creed III's E3 presentation was steered exclusively by developers working on the game, as were all subsequent demos shown to the public. In fact, this past week marked the first occasion on which Ubisoft allowed a wide swath of press types to lay hand to controller in a fully hands-on demo of the game.

What I found in my time with Assassin's Creed III is a game that offers no shortage of ambition. The three years Ubisoft has spent developing AC III is readily apparent in the sheer volume of systems and upgrades and straight-up new features peppered throughout the experience. And yet, with that in mind, this is still very much an Assassin's Creed game. For all the marketing's talk of radical changes from where things have been the last couple of years in this series, the truth is, you could pretty easily slot this game right down in front of Assassin's Creed: Revelations. It feels like a progression, not an overwhelming shift.

For some, that's likely good news. For those who have hoped that maybe this time around, Ubisoft had found a tighter, more comfortable balance between the aerobatic craziness and timing-focused stabbings, you may find Assassin's Creed III an improvement, albeit not a drastic one.

The Final Frontier

Admittedly, I may not have seen all the new combat and gameplay systems on offer, because I, like the rest of the press shown this near-final build of the game, was essentially dropped into the deep end. The missions we played fell somewhere toward the early middle of the game, several chapters into the assassination career of Connor, the series' new protagonist. Looking at Connor's inventory screens, it's apparent right away that there's more to wrestle with here than in previous games. You have more weapons, more ways of taking on the redcoats and Templars that stand in your path.

All sorts of unexpected dangers lurk in the frontier.

I don't mention continual series protagonist Desmond because we were shown no story elements featuring him. Instead, we joined Connor during the formative years of the American Revolution. Connor finds himself in the company of would-be patriots, including the likes of Samuel Adams. Adams and Connor already have a familiarity with each other at this point in the game, though it's unclear how. All I'm told is that Connor's interests overlap with the assassin's goal of rooting out the Templars currently on American soil.

To do this, I found myself wandering between the city of Boston and the new frontier area. To say that Ubisoft has taken some liberties with the design of New England's geography would be an understatement. Just outside the city walls of Boston, we find a massive frontier, full of relatively dense foliage, rock walls, and rivers. Animal life permeates the landscape, including some rather nasty predators like wolves and bears. Connor, given his Native American heritage, is adept at navigating the land and hunting its creatures, which you'll do for pelts and other animal goods that can be sold or consumed.

Navigating the frontier is by far the biggest change longtime fans will find themselves wrestling with. Accustomed to the bustling streets of ancient cities, the frontier provides a great deal more nature than structure. You'll have to get accustomed to figuring out which trees and rocks can be traversed, and which are simply inaccessible. With trees that's easier, but rocks can be tough to size up quickly, while pursuing or being pursued. It's going to take you some time to learn the subtle differences.

Fortunately, the controls are generally responsive when traversing nature's obstacles. Outside of a couple of minor hiccups, I found myself mostly floating from tree-to-tree as I would rooftop-to-rooftop in any of the series' previous cities. It's different and familiar all at once.

The Old Homestead

The frontier also happens to house your base of operations. The homestead, which is managed by an older (possibly freed) slave named Achilles, is where you'll come to discover side missions, as well as populate the surrounding area with tradesmen and other settlers. You'll meet such folk while exploring side missions throughout the frontier. In one case I found myself chasing after poachers who attacked a young frontier woman, and in another I had to rescue a traveling tradesman from a gang of highway bandits. These people, thankful for your help, join your little frontier community, giving you new people to trade with.

Here is also where you'll find one of the many dock ports you can use to take on a naval mission.

Two, if by Sea

Once you get out onto the ocean in Assassin's Creed III, it's like a whole other game opens up. Granted, that game is a strange, sometimes frustrating arcade naval combat simulator, but apart from that, it's cool.

Once you get out to sea, Assassin's Creed III becomes a wildly different animal.

For reasons that were not quite explained in any of the missions I played, Connor has access to a naval warship he can sail up and down the eastern seaboard at his leisure. I took on one of the closer-by missions, which required me to escort a merchant's ship to shore at Martha's Vineyard, while British gunboats closed in on the ship's position. Through this mission, I got to try out two distinct methods of naval combat. When engaging the British gunboats, a more nimble, less overtly powerful gun was used, whereas later, when engaging a well-defended fort, I began firing off the cannons. In either event, you'll have to juggle steering the ship and aiming your guns at the same time. When fighting the ships, accuracy was more imperative, while with the cannons, all I really had to do was line the ship up more or less alongside the fort and just blast away.

This is just one mission in what appears to be a whole plot subsection unto itself. Hopefully there's some good context for why Connor's also a master and commander of a ship in his spare hours, but even without, the naval stuff at least seems to make for a fun, if wildly different gameplay experience. It's certainly an improvement over the tower defense stuff from the last go-around.

The Sacred Art of Stabbing That Guy

One of the biggest alterations Ubisoft has been selling on Assassin's Creed III is a completely overhauled combat system. The goal was to make Connor's ability to navigate the city streets and untouched wilderness with greater deftness, while essentially jumping in and out of combat at the drop of a hat. After fiddling with it over several missions, I'll say that there are definitely moments when the new animations and mechanics make for truly thrilling moments. And yet, there are others where that fluidity doesn't come through at all, and those moments arguably stand out more.

Combat has a way of taking on a life of its own, which has its pluses and minuses.

Without getting too preachy about one man's system over another, I feel like it's safe to say that in a post-Arkham Asylum world, there is an expectation to how combat in a hand-to-hand-focused game like this should feel. Assassin's Creed III lives up to that expectation in fits and starts, if what I've seen is representative of the greater whole.

First, the good. One of the absolute best things about the system is the addition of running assassinations. With this maneuver, you can pretty much just run up on a guy full speed, and if you time your attack, you'll use whatever weapon you have on you to deftly, remorselessly murder whatever guy happens to be in your way, while tossing aside his body in one swift motion. It's a beautifully horrible thing to behold.

On the flip side, straight-up hand-to-hand combat feels good, but not great. Part of the problem admittedly had to do with being dropped in well into the game, where different methods necessary to kill off special types of enemies are undoubtedly briefed to the player. So without that information, I found myself relying on counter attacks and less-focused stabbings and bludgeonings of my enemies. There are tons of different combo moves that can result in incredibly gruesome/frankly hilarious finishing moves. But when they don't, you tend to find yourself in sometimes dull, often brief knife/sword/hatchet battles with guys either shoving or firing muskets at you. It's fun enough when you're pulling off the top flight moves, but the basic combat still feels a bit sluggish at times, as if animations are overtaking the player's control, resulting in maneuvers not coming out quickly enough to avoid attacks. It's not unmanageable, but it does feel inelegant compared with some of the better hand-to-hand combat games of late.

Assassinating With Friends

As is custom nowadays, Assassin's Creed III comes with its own multiplayer component, where teams of Abstergo employees can "train" to fight the assassins by killing randomized targets, or each other. I got to try both the competitive and cooperative modes. Competitively, it's what you'd expect. You choose an avatar and walk around an environment with your competitors. You're given a designated target to kill, but another player has also been given you as a target, thus requiring you to always keep one eye over your shoulder while stalking your own prey. Cooperative is the same idea, except you're all a team working toward the same target.

If you had any affinity for previous Assassin's multiplayer modes, you shouldn't have any issues with this one. It seemingly makes enough smart changes to be a good amount of fun, provided you've got some able assassins around to play against/with.

On Liberation

Ubisoft also gave us brief access to Assassin's Creed III: Liberation, the Vita-only side story featuring Aveline, a female assassin in 18th century New Orleans. Though her plot overlaps with some of AC III's timelines, hers is an entirely separate story. I played through a little of it, and found a game that certainly feels like Assassin's Creed, albeit stiffer in a few key ways.

I'd be lying if I said Aveline's Vita adventure left much of an impression on me.

Once again, I was dropped in a tad too far into the game to precisely glean what was going on in the story, but the basic idea seemed to revolve around Aveline's stalking of a local governor, who after much rabble-rousing from the townspeople, finds himself on the wrong end of a revolution. Aveline, along with a friendly French dandy, began to incite riots among the people, while murdering the occasional guard in the process.

Maybe it's just because I had spent hours prior playing the console game, but in playing the Vita version, I generally found myself thrilled with neither the animation nor the mission designs I saw. While the scaling down of certain things is inevitable given the platform differences, Assassin's Creed doesn't feel quite right if the movements of its lead character don't have a graceful flow to them. Aveline's movements often seemed a bit stiff and labored. And while swinging around a giant port city was certainly fun, the missions I was presented with--at least two of which featured fail conditions if I was spotted--dragged. Even the promise of riding an explosive carriage into a winery for some reason didn't really get me particularly excited. I wish I had a more elegant way of saying the game just felt "off," but that's really all I've got.

But Is it Fun?

With Liberation, I can't say I've seen enough to say one way or the other. But as for Assassin's Creed III?Yes. Assassin's Creed III is lots of fun. When the stars align and you get into the rhythms of the combat and traversal mechanics, the gameplay becomes a sweet mixture of terrific animation and fantastic world design. I think it's necessary to come in with reasonable expectations, of course. Assassin's Creed III does a lot of things new, and not every single one of them works to the game's advantage. And likewise, certain things that might look revelatory in a trailer might not be quite so when you have the controller in-hand. But first and foremost, I had fun while playing Assassin's Creed III, something I didn't have during my brief bouts with AC: Brotherhood and Revelations. Take that for what it's worth.

Staff
#1 Posted by Alex (1973 posts) -

Ubisoft has made it a point to repeatedly describe Assassin's Creed III as "one of the most anticipated games of all-time." It's right there at the front of each of the publisher's behind-the-scenes looks at the game. I don't know what basis Ubisoft is using to make that claim--possibly they're examining pre-order numbers and making an educated guess--but regardless as to whether it's true, the publisher has done an excellent job marketing this latest Assassin's sequel as if it is. Assassin's Creed III was one of the stand-out demos at this year's E3, garnering all sorts of awards, mostly for its incredible visual presentation and seemingly fluid assassination gameplay.

I say seemingly only because most of us never actually got to put our hands on the game. Assassin's Creed III's E3 presentation was steered exclusively by developers working on the game, as were all subsequent demos shown to the public. In fact, this past week marked the first occasion on which Ubisoft allowed a wide swath of press types to lay hand to controller in a fully hands-on demo of the game.

What I found in my time with Assassin's Creed III is a game that offers no shortage of ambition. The three years Ubisoft has spent developing AC III is readily apparent in the sheer volume of systems and upgrades and straight-up new features peppered throughout the experience. And yet, with that in mind, this is still very much an Assassin's Creed game. For all the marketing's talk of radical changes from where things have been the last couple of years in this series, the truth is, you could pretty easily slot this game right down in front of Assassin's Creed: Revelations. It feels like a progression, not an overwhelming shift.

For some, that's likely good news. For those who have hoped that maybe this time around, Ubisoft had found a tighter, more comfortable balance between the aerobatic craziness and timing-focused stabbings, you may find Assassin's Creed III an improvement, albeit not a drastic one.

The Final Frontier

Admittedly, I may not have seen all the new combat and gameplay systems on offer, because I, like the rest of the press shown this near-final build of the game, was essentially dropped into the deep end. The missions we played fell somewhere toward the early middle of the game, several chapters into the assassination career of Connor, the series' new protagonist. Looking at Connor's inventory screens, it's apparent right away that there's more to wrestle with here than in previous games. You have more weapons, more ways of taking on the redcoats and Templars that stand in your path.

All sorts of unexpected dangers lurk in the frontier.

I don't mention continual series protagonist Desmond because we were shown no story elements featuring him. Instead, we joined Connor during the formative years of the American Revolution. Connor finds himself in the company of would-be patriots, including the likes of Samuel Adams. Adams and Connor already have a familiarity with each other at this point in the game, though it's unclear how. All I'm told is that Connor's interests overlap with the assassin's goal of rooting out the Templars currently on American soil.

To do this, I found myself wandering between the city of Boston and the new frontier area. To say that Ubisoft has taken some liberties with the design of New England's geography would be an understatement. Just outside the city walls of Boston, we find a massive frontier, full of relatively dense foliage, rock walls, and rivers. Animal life permeates the landscape, including some rather nasty predators like wolves and bears. Connor, given his Native American heritage, is adept at navigating the land and hunting its creatures, which you'll do for pelts and other animal goods that can be sold or consumed.

Navigating the frontier is by far the biggest change longtime fans will find themselves wrestling with. Accustomed to the bustling streets of ancient cities, the frontier provides a great deal more nature than structure. You'll have to get accustomed to figuring out which trees and rocks can be traversed, and which are simply inaccessible. With trees that's easier, but rocks can be tough to size up quickly, while pursuing or being pursued. It's going to take you some time to learn the subtle differences.

Fortunately, the controls are generally responsive when traversing nature's obstacles. Outside of a couple of minor hiccups, I found myself mostly floating from tree-to-tree as I would rooftop-to-rooftop in any of the series' previous cities. It's different and familiar all at once.

The Old Homestead

The frontier also happens to house your base of operations. The homestead, which is managed by an older (possibly freed) slave named Achilles, is where you'll come to discover side missions, as well as populate the surrounding area with tradesmen and other settlers. You'll meet such folk while exploring side missions throughout the frontier. In one case I found myself chasing after poachers who attacked a young frontier woman, and in another I had to rescue a traveling tradesman from a gang of highway bandits. These people, thankful for your help, join your little frontier community, giving you new people to trade with.

Here is also where you'll find one of the many dock ports you can use to take on a naval mission.

Two, if by Sea

Once you get out onto the ocean in Assassin's Creed III, it's like a whole other game opens up. Granted, that game is a strange, sometimes frustrating arcade naval combat simulator, but apart from that, it's cool.

Once you get out to sea, Assassin's Creed III becomes a wildly different animal.

For reasons that were not quite explained in any of the missions I played, Connor has access to a naval warship he can sail up and down the eastern seaboard at his leisure. I took on one of the closer-by missions, which required me to escort a merchant's ship to shore at Martha's Vineyard, while British gunboats closed in on the ship's position. Through this mission, I got to try out two distinct methods of naval combat. When engaging the British gunboats, a more nimble, less overtly powerful gun was used, whereas later, when engaging a well-defended fort, I began firing off the cannons. In either event, you'll have to juggle steering the ship and aiming your guns at the same time. When fighting the ships, accuracy was more imperative, while with the cannons, all I really had to do was line the ship up more or less alongside the fort and just blast away.

This is just one mission in what appears to be a whole plot subsection unto itself. Hopefully there's some good context for why Connor's also a master and commander of a ship in his spare hours, but even without, the naval stuff at least seems to make for a fun, if wildly different gameplay experience. It's certainly an improvement over the tower defense stuff from the last go-around.

The Sacred Art of Stabbing That Guy

One of the biggest alterations Ubisoft has been selling on Assassin's Creed III is a completely overhauled combat system. The goal was to make Connor's ability to navigate the city streets and untouched wilderness with greater deftness, while essentially jumping in and out of combat at the drop of a hat. After fiddling with it over several missions, I'll say that there are definitely moments when the new animations and mechanics make for truly thrilling moments. And yet, there are others where that fluidity doesn't come through at all, and those moments arguably stand out more.

Combat has a way of taking on a life of its own, which has its pluses and minuses.

Without getting too preachy about one man's system over another, I feel like it's safe to say that in a post-Arkham Asylum world, there is an expectation to how combat in a hand-to-hand-focused game like this should feel. Assassin's Creed III lives up to that expectation in fits and starts, if what I've seen is representative of the greater whole.

First, the good. One of the absolute best things about the system is the addition of running assassinations. With this maneuver, you can pretty much just run up on a guy full speed, and if you time your attack, you'll use whatever weapon you have on you to deftly, remorselessly murder whatever guy happens to be in your way, while tossing aside his body in one swift motion. It's a beautifully horrible thing to behold.

On the flip side, straight-up hand-to-hand combat feels good, but not great. Part of the problem admittedly had to do with being dropped in well into the game, where different methods necessary to kill off special types of enemies are undoubtedly briefed to the player. So without that information, I found myself relying on counter attacks and less-focused stabbings and bludgeonings of my enemies. There are tons of different combo moves that can result in incredibly gruesome/frankly hilarious finishing moves. But when they don't, you tend to find yourself in sometimes dull, often brief knife/sword/hatchet battles with guys either shoving or firing muskets at you. It's fun enough when you're pulling off the top flight moves, but the basic combat still feels a bit sluggish at times, as if animations are overtaking the player's control, resulting in maneuvers not coming out quickly enough to avoid attacks. It's not unmanageable, but it does feel inelegant compared with some of the better hand-to-hand combat games of late.

Assassinating With Friends

As is custom nowadays, Assassin's Creed III comes with its own multiplayer component, where teams of Abstergo employees can "train" to fight the assassins by killing randomized targets, or each other. I got to try both the competitive and cooperative modes. Competitively, it's what you'd expect. You choose an avatar and walk around an environment with your competitors. You're given a designated target to kill, but another player has also been given you as a target, thus requiring you to always keep one eye over your shoulder while stalking your own prey. Cooperative is the same idea, except you're all a team working toward the same target.

If you had any affinity for previous Assassin's multiplayer modes, you shouldn't have any issues with this one. It seemingly makes enough smart changes to be a good amount of fun, provided you've got some able assassins around to play against/with.

On Liberation

Ubisoft also gave us brief access to Assassin's Creed III: Liberation, the Vita-only side story featuring Aveline, a female assassin in 18th century New Orleans. Though her plot overlaps with some of AC III's timelines, hers is an entirely separate story. I played through a little of it, and found a game that certainly feels like Assassin's Creed, albeit stiffer in a few key ways.

I'd be lying if I said Aveline's Vita adventure left much of an impression on me.

Once again, I was dropped in a tad too far into the game to precisely glean what was going on in the story, but the basic idea seemed to revolve around Aveline's stalking of a local governor, who after much rabble-rousing from the townspeople, finds himself on the wrong end of a revolution. Aveline, along with a friendly French dandy, began to incite riots among the people, while murdering the occasional guard in the process.

Maybe it's just because I had spent hours prior playing the console game, but in playing the Vita version, I generally found myself thrilled with neither the animation nor the mission designs I saw. While the scaling down of certain things is inevitable given the platform differences, Assassin's Creed doesn't feel quite right if the movements of its lead character don't have a graceful flow to them. Aveline's movements often seemed a bit stiff and labored. And while swinging around a giant port city was certainly fun, the missions I was presented with--at least two of which featured fail conditions if I was spotted--dragged. Even the promise of riding an explosive carriage into a winery for some reason didn't really get me particularly excited. I wish I had a more elegant way of saying the game just felt "off," but that's really all I've got.

But Is it Fun?

With Liberation, I can't say I've seen enough to say one way or the other. But as for Assassin's Creed III?Yes. Assassin's Creed III is lots of fun. When the stars align and you get into the rhythms of the combat and traversal mechanics, the gameplay becomes a sweet mixture of terrific animation and fantastic world design. I think it's necessary to come in with reasonable expectations, of course. Assassin's Creed III does a lot of things new, and not every single one of them works to the game's advantage. And likewise, certain things that might look revelatory in a trailer might not be quite so when you have the controller in-hand. But first and foremost, I had fun while playing Assassin's Creed III, something I didn't have during my brief bouts with AC: Brotherhood and Revelations. Take that for what it's worth.

Staff
#2 Edited by Triumvir (459 posts) -

first?

This looks much cooler than I had expected. But as cool as this game may look, I still don't know if I can be persuaded to pick up a Vita, considering the lack of support from 3rd party devs and even Sony itself. A price drop wouldn't hurt either.

#3 Posted by DigTheDoug (178 posts) -

@Triumvir said:

first?

Ha ha. Serves you right.

#4 Posted by wumbo3000 (937 posts) -

Holy crap, I'm so excited for this game that I'm deliberately not reading this. I don't want anything spoiled and I want AC III to be a totally fresh experience. But I'm sure it's a great write up Alex. :D

#5 Posted by Clubvodka (411 posts) -

Can't wait for this game but I only really care about Desmond's story and how it's going to end. That's all I've cared about since AC I.

#6 Posted by ZenZuke (3 posts) -

@Triumvir: Well, if no one buys a Vita why would 3rd parties support it? If a lot of people buy Vitas everyone and their mothers will support it.

#7 Posted by GunsAreDrawn (309 posts) -

Alex Navarro! Seems like you hardly write for this site anymore.

#8 Posted by Phat2 (22 posts) -

@Triumvir said:

first?

This looks much cooler than I had expected. But as cool as this game may look, I still don't know if I can be persuaded to pick up a Vita, considering the lack of support from 3rd party devs and even Sony itself. A price drop wouldn't hurt either.

lol u fucked it up

#9 Posted by Brodehouse (9587 posts) -

So I bet Connor and Aveline have sex to create Desmond's next ancestor. I bet Aveline is related to Ezio/Altair (Connor is explicitly said that he is not).

#10 Posted by Parsnip (1077 posts) -

No interest in the Vita game, but so excited for 3.

#11 Posted by morrelloman (606 posts) -

I love the AC series. I even played that dumb ass facebook game. So for def I will play both of these.

#12 Posted by HT101 (1151 posts) -

I am definitely excited for AC3 to finally come out.

#13 Posted by TheHT (10888 posts) -

Man, video games look so good these days.

#14 Posted by RE_Player1 (7549 posts) -

I got both pre-ordered so I hope they turn out good. Even if Liberation is a less memorable side story I'm up for that.

#15 Posted by huntad (1930 posts) -

I hope 3 turns out good. I was hoping for some more drastic improvements, so we'll see.

#16 Posted by Brandino (246 posts) -

Great article! Picking up both day 1.

Hoping Liberation is decent because my Vita has been collecting dust for about 2 months.

#17 Posted by jerseyscum (862 posts) -

I'll deal with a little janky gameplay for the slew of cool shit AC3 looks like it's offering.

#18 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (912 posts) -

Is the girl in the Vita game a Brit? If so I will get it, other than that no deal for ether game.

#19 Edited by AhmadMetallic (18955 posts) -

@Alex said:

Ubisoft has made it a point to repeatedly describe Assassin's Creed III as "one of the most anticipated games of all-time." It's right there at the front of each of the publisher's behind-the-scenes looks at the game. I don't know what basis Ubisoft is using to make that claim--possibly they're examining pre-order numbers and making an educated guess

No no, Ubisoft pull statistics out of their ass. According to a recent article by Patrick, Ubisoft said that 675% of PC gamers are pirates or something.

You'll have to get accustomed to figuring out which trees and rocks can be traversed, and which are simply inaccessible. With trees that's easier, but rocks can be tough to size up quickly, while pursuing or being pursued. It's going to take you some time to learn the subtle differences.

I can't fucking wait :D

Edit: I stopped reading there because this is my most anticipated game in a long time and I don't wanna know anything about it!

#20 Posted by iAmJohn (6108 posts) -

@Jonny_Anonymous said:

Is the girl in the Vita game a Brit? If so I will get it, other than that no deal for ether game.

That's a pretty stupid condition to put on your purchase of two related but ultimately distinct games.

The answer is no, by the way. She's French-Creole.

#21 Posted by JackW (4 posts) -

Assassins Creed III: Liberation is like the only reason I am going to buy a vita.

#22 Posted by chose (272 posts) -

Osti, l'hiver s'en vient.

#23 Posted by Nightriff (4915 posts) -

I'm more interested in the Vita game, even preordered it from Amazon, but that is mainly because I recently beat Brotherhood and as every AC game is to me, I need a break between them. For some reason I think the Vita release will be different enough for me to enjoy AC again but it will probably mean a longer break in between playing Revelations, then getting to play 3.

#24 Posted by panvixyl (325 posts) -

So fucking excited for these games. As much as I loved Ezio it was about time we got some new characters, locations, and times - never thought the Renaissance could bore me.

Also, the fact that our protagonists in these money-raking, world-renowned, big-budget blockbuster games are a Native dude and a Creole lady? Fierce.

#25 Posted by altairre (1127 posts) -

I played and loved every AC game (maybe the original not so much) even Revelations so I'm fucking stoked about this.

#26 Edited by NTM (7266 posts) -

I'm already really excited to play Assassin's Creed III, but just reading this makes me more excited.

@Clubvodka: Yeah, Desmond's aspect is very important, and I really do love the whole sci-fi aspect of it all, but I wouldn't say it as you do, 'cause that's almost like saying the game's not really fun and their take on the historical aspects doesn't really matter, and I'm just as excited to see all of that just as I am to see where Desmond's story is going. I've said it before, but Assassin's Creed is very interesting because it blends sci-fi (present/future) with history (past). While none of the games are perfect, I really love them, not so much the first one though...

#27 Posted by DJJoeJoe (1317 posts) -

@TheHT: Yea I was going to say maybe not in that last image but I'd skimmed this article and didn't realise that was of the Vita version, and for that it looks pretty dang great (especially everything that isn't the environment).

Video games you guys, this long generation has seemingly forced a lot of games to focus on presentation stuff more. We are also coming up on what hopefully will allow a good jump forward as well, take Watch Dogs as an example of hopefully the low end of coming visuals (Watch Dogs really just looks like a well done game from this gen, for PC, not anything from proper next gen).

#28 Edited by PillClinton (3290 posts) -

All those screenshots are so obviously from the PC version, which I'm quite eager to play. Looks great!

@DJJoeJoe: Agreed. Watch Dogs, while fantastic looking, really just looks like a current-gen console game running at a higher res with better settings. Star Wars 1313, on the other hand, appears to be a true taste of what next gen systems have to offer.

#29 Posted by steelerzfan101 (270 posts) -

I am interested to see what the Wii U version of the game offers. I would be pretty interested if they offer some cool exclusive features for the Wii U version. But, I will be disappointed if they offer a dumbed down version of the game!

#30 Posted by Viking_Funeral (1736 posts) -

@Triumvir said:

first?

This looks much cooler than I had expected. But as cool as this game may look, I still don't know if I can be persuaded to pick up a Vita, considering the lack of support from 3rd party devs and even Sony itself. A price drop wouldn't hurt either.

Ouch. Somebody doesn't know about the rule.

#31 Posted by Nettacki (1317 posts) -

Am still more interested in the Vita game than the console one. Mainly because it's the sort of game that I'm planning to get on Vita if/when I get one.

#32 Posted by Triumvir (459 posts) -

@ZenZuke: That's the thing. It's a vicious cycle. Why would you buy a system that you would hardly use because of a lack of content? The onus is on hardware manufacturers to support a platform, to provide consumers with a value proposition and a library of software. The onus is not on the consumer to take a leap of faith.

#33 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (912 posts) -
@iAmJohn said:

@Jonny_Anonymous said:

Is the girl in the Vita game a Brit? If so I will get it, other than that no deal for ether game.

That's a pretty stupid condition to put on your purchase of two related but ultimately distinct games.

The answer is no, by the way. She's French-Creole.

Thanks for sharing 
#34 Posted by Landon (4130 posts) -

@JackW said:

Assassins Creed III: Liberation is like the only reason I am going to buy a vita.

Thats a dumb reason.

#35 Posted by Orange_Pork (583 posts) -

@JackW said:

Assassins Creed III: Liberation is like the only reason I am going to buy a vita.

Same. I'll pick some other stuff up for it too but, seriously, that thing's going to be a Liberation machine for a longass time.

#36 Posted by PrioritySeven (322 posts) -

After being disappointed with AC:Rev, I'm relieved to read that ACIII is looking pretty good. All aboard the hype train!

#37 Posted by SuperPickle (28 posts) -

I do not give a fly fuck about this game the first game was ass and the other 2 almost sucked as much so this is "one of the least anticipated games of all-time" to me./

#38 Posted by EverydayOdyssey (171 posts) -

I was hoping for a more positive write-up of Liberation, considering Playstation Blog thought it played pretty well. Hopefully Liberation will be worth a purchase - I really want to play some good games on my Vita.

#39 Posted by sthusby (382 posts) -

@ZenZuke: The Wii begs to differ.

#40 Posted by GERALTITUDE (2923 posts) -

Good write up Alex. I appreciate the objectivity shinning through your indifference. All in all sounds like what we've been expecting: more of the same with some new tweaks.

#41 Posted by csl316 (8114 posts) -

Good write up, which will help me keep my expectations in check.

#42 Posted by Ace20A (25 posts) -

But still, the tomahawk, hidden-blade dagger, dual muskets and bow and arrows aren't the only weapons you can use, right? Cause that would be too few. The secondary weapons like smoke bomb or throwing knives in previous ACs are actually useful because they give you more tactical choices.

#43 Posted by Delta_Ass (3255 posts) -

So I guess Assassin's Creed III is a thing.

#44 Posted by siLVUR (113 posts) -

Woot woot, ACIII.

Everything I see about it makes me wish October 30 would come sooner.

#45 Posted by Kear (109 posts) -

I find the "most anticipated game of all time" thing to be pretty funny. At the same time, I've never played an Assasin's Creed game, and I'll probably play this one. The american revolution is an interesting and untapped place to set a video game. Can't wait to stab those tea-taxing mother fuckers.

#46 Posted by DeF (4801 posts) -

AC: Rev is still sitting on the shelf ...I hope I can get to that before AC III comes out.

#47 Posted by probablytuna (3539 posts) -

Finished with Revelations a few months ago in preparation for ACIII. Bring on the the frontier!

#48 Posted by Nentisys (886 posts) -

I hope this sells well for Ubisoft.

Although I have zero interest in ever playing a AC game, Ubisoft does publish a decent amount of games that I do like.

#49 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

Heavily touched up screenshots and/or downscaled, but that's to be expected for promo shots. Still a bit misleading.

#50 Posted by Meltac (1999 posts) -

I'll get Far Cry 3 instead, and then buy this when it gets cheaper.

This edit will also create new pages on Giant Bomb for:

Beware, you are proposing to add brand new pages to the wiki along with your edits. Make sure this is what you intended. This will likely increase the time it takes for your changes to go live.

Comment and Save

Until you earn 1000 points all your submissions need to be vetted by other Giant Bomb users. This process takes no more than a few hours and we'll send you an email once approved.