TKTK.

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#151 Edited by MordeaniisChaos (5730 posts) -

@internetdetective said:

Right now I am designing a game called Micropenis Quest, I just want to show people what it's like to live with this condition. Oh, I do not suffer from this it is for a friend. Seriously. You probably don't know him, he lives in Canada.

I don't want to play a game made by a Canadian. I mean for a Canadian.

#152 Posted by Ceremor (8 posts) -

I wouldn't have gone down this particular rabbit hole if it weren't for you Patrick, and it was really a unique, engaging experience. Not like any other kind of fiction I've read or played or watched. Maybe it's just me, but I could really feel the swaying emotions as the main character had his ups and downs. I could feel the doubt that he had when thinking about telling others about what he was going through and I felt genuinely relieved when he started seeing the therapist, when he finally started to open up to people and when he'd finally found a little bit of contentment with that last holiday with his family it was overwhelming how glad I was that things were finally at least getting a little bit better.

Those strange waves of emotions, coupled with the immersive nature of the medium makes it such a profound, unique experience. Thanks for that.

#153 Posted by MeatXbeatsXman (238 posts) -

Coinciding with depression, are those feelings of derealization/depersonalization; the "unreality" of existence, both "internally" and "externally"; where one's inherent emptiness starts to disclose itself, so that we may comes to grips with it. This truth is of no actual use or purpose beyond its happening, and yet we still find ourselves in pain and discontent. For we are very much still engaged, subjecting ourselves to other people's notions and ideas about life and how to go about living it. It can leave one feeling apathetic and lethargic, to the point where lying on the floor and acting a corpse is a viable way to spend an evening, or even multiple years; you don't even know who you are, let alone what your story is going to be; so what use are you to anyone? and you can't help but wonder "How does anyone get anything done?"

Depression keeps one at odds with themselves, turning about-face the will; severely crippling your sense of freedom, and desire to get up(once again). To the point where you neglect your well-being, never trusting yourself to do what's right for your life, because you're terrified of not knowing what happens after you fail; after something you poured your life into, dies. So, you're left in a state of inaction, holding on instead of letting go.

I still struggle, but that's ok. It's the only way you learn. Be a fool, be kind, and keep going with what has you in love. it's all void anyways. "Life is painful, suffering is optional." Sylvia Boorstein

Once again, Patrick, another compelling read. (fist bump)

#154 Posted by MeatXbeatsXman (238 posts) -

I think a virtual group hug is in order. (squeeeeeze)

#155 Edited by elpurplemonkey (153 posts) -

I love that games like this can exist, and I love that Patrick brings them to light here on GB.

#156 Edited by LiquidPrince (16020 posts) -

I understand that it's a somewhat naive proposition, but wouldn't it be better to create a game that gives players hope through other means then "hey you're depressed, don't worry you're not alone!"

Why create a game that has no endgame and just leaves the player in a down mood afterwords? Wouldn't be more clever to have a character who is suffering from depression, and goes through hardships, but by the end finds some measure of peace in a way that is beneficial.

I mean yeah, it's not the most realistic thing when you have your game character who is suffering from depression, overcome it to some degree by the end, but it's smarter and sends a better message. I mean like the article says, depression is something that most people have or aware of; 1 in 10 people in fact. So it's not like people are unaware of the problem.

I think it's smarter to come up with a story that draws empathy from the player and makes them aware of the issues, but tries to present a hopeful outcome. If not a solution, then a message, "this character was able to find some peace, and perhaps you can to." It's harder, but smarter. I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing, when so many people know from experience that it is a thing. How about trying to make those people feel better.

#157 Posted by TehPickle (509 posts) -

The real-world methodology of depression diagnosis is no less wishy-washy than how this game chooses to try and express it (which I commend, at the very least).

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/interactive/interactivetests/goldberg.php

I've taken this above test (or something very, very similar to it) many times in the past, under the advice of doctors, to test if I'm depressed. How is that any more objective?

#158 Posted by optimusprime223 (399 posts) -

I know I am not going to play this, but I really appreciate the fact that someone has made it. That may sound hypocritical, but I simply do not have much time to play games so dont get to play as much indie stuff as I would like.

I appreciate it because I went through a period of...well I guess it is depression, and I ended up in therapy because of it. It is my firm belief that therapy sucks, not in that it is bad and has no effect, but it forces you to confront what your feeling with a stranger, which is a strange scenario. It made me snap out of myself and want to get better because I absolutely didn't want keep going to therapy.

Maybe if I had thought to look for a game on this subject I would have found Depression Quest and that would have helped just as much...I dunno, hindsight is a bitch after all. I am glad this game exists, and I hope it has helped more than just Jennifer. My issues aren't as bad as those depicted in the article, but it is still something I have to deal with everyday and while I have learned things aren't as bad as I thought, I can still struggle. Definitely going to recommend this to anyone who I talk to about this matter, it might just help them out.

#160 Edited by Fallen189 (5036 posts) -

@fallen189 said:

It's kind of stupid how any loser who is addicted to the internet throws around the term "I'm so depressed" when they really mean lethargic/apathetic

if you're generalizing most/everyone who is depressed as "simply" a lazy person that's pretty sickening.

lethargy is a clear symptom of depression. people idle away their time if they feel stuck somewhere in their lives, use it as a means of escape or deferring their troubles. from personal experience i would say a depressed person typically want more than anything to overcome their own lack of willingness to engage life.

but thanks for finally finding the solution to "depression!" you'll make millions happy i'm sure.

I used to have such severe depression and anxiety that I couldnt leave the house, and lost my job, while also failing my first year of university. You're putting words in my mouth by implying that I'm claiming "All depressed people are actually just lazy". I'm referring more to the kinds of people who are just marginally sad, and want ANY EXCUSE to self diagnose themselves with chronic depression. But whatever, jump down my throat more, please.

#161 Edited by Sweep (8927 posts) -

@envane said:

@sweep said:

Just played through Depression Quest and was actually kinda startled by how much of it I could relate to. I don't feel depressed, though? Am I depressed?! I don't think I am. I feel great! Right? Yeah! ....yeah.

I don't know what's real any more!

pretty sure youre just an alcoholic

:(

Moderator
#162 Posted by AlphaDormante (44 posts) -

I understand that it's a somewhat naive proposition, but wouldn't it be better to create a game that gives players hope through other means then "hey you're depressed, don't worry you're not alone!"

Why create a game that has no endgame and just leaves the player in a down mood afterwords? Wouldn't be more clever to have a character who is suffering from depression, and goes through hardships, but by the end finds some measure of peace in a way that is beneficial.

I mean yeah, it's not the most realistic thing when you have your game character who is suffering from depression, overcome it to some degree by the end, but it's smarter and sends a better message. I mean like the article says, depression is something that most people have or aware of; 1 in 10 people in fact. So it's not like people are unaware of the problem.

I think it's smarter to come up with a story that draws empathy from the player and makes them aware of the issues, but tries to present a hopeful outcome. If not a solution, then a message, "this character was able to find some peace, and perhaps you can to." It's harder, but smarter. I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing, when so many people know from experience that it is a thing. How about trying to make those people feel better.

For me personally, this sort of thing wouldn't have helped at all. You have to understand that depression has a habit of making you feel like you're not worth it, like you're a bigger failure than anyone else in existence, like you specifically have no future simply because you are you and not somebody else. It's absolute moon logic, but that's how it is with depression. You're the star of the show, everything is about you, and everything about you sucks.

If the game had ended on a happy-ish note, then I would have undoubtedly sneered and thought "well, how nice for you." I would have resigned myself to the fact that apparently anyone can improve their life but me. That I must have just been too much of an idiot or a coward to pull it off. Again, it's all ridiculous, but at some point you just actively look for reasons to hate yourself. It's an addictive drug that generates itself.

I'm happier that the game ends on an ambiguous note. For me, the solidarity I felt between myself and my character was enough to make me feel better. That's how it is among a lot of depression sufferers. I know the whole "hey, I feel like a worthless human being, too!" mentality doesn't seem like it would be the healthiest basis in the world for a relationship, but it helps more than you might think. Think of depression as a war in which your fellow sufferers are the people fighting at your side through every battle. All the crap you both go through just makes it plain easier to reach out to them.

That's why I don't think an encouraging ending to Depression Quest would work as well. Recovering from depression simply isn't a process that can be encapsulated in a few screens and dialogue choices. It's slow and subtle and it's different for everyone. The most positive ending to Depression Quest actually seems to touch on this, or at least point your character in the general direction of it, and I'm so glad it didn't go any further than that. Quite frankly, if they'd outright talked about how things got better, I'd have felt like I was being fed candy-coated platitudes. Another generic lecture from another generic person who thinks it's "that easy". I like to think that I wouldn't feel such petty resentment towards my real-life fellow sufferers if they were ever to recover; I think it's just the fact that since it's a work of fiction, there's always the concern that it's going to preach condescending feel-good shit at me when I want no part of it.

So in essence: I like the most positive ending of Depression Quest just as it is, even though it's still ambiguously...well, depressing. It feels less condescending towards me personally, as though the person who wrote it really does understand what it's like and isn't just using it as a springboard to lob his positive image bullhorkey in my face. And non-sufferers, the intended audience, are given the chance to understand how sufferers really live and how they tend to see their future. To me, that's far better than an overtly hopeful ending.

Anywho, that's my take on things. I tried to be objective about it...but I don't believe I really succeeded, so definitely take it all with a grain of salt.

#163 Edited by feetoffthesky (37 posts) -

Thank you so much for writing this wonderful article Patrick. Thank you for bringing some positive attention to this game. As a person who lives with depression this game was one of the deciding factors in me seeking more extensive counseling to help me with some of my issues. When playing through this I found many of the similarities between the character and myself to be startling. It allowed for some stark realizations and profound re-contextualization of my daily activities. I was finally able to admit to myself that my anxieties about being around other people and my lethargy towards my loved ones was an actual problem because I was able to see that someone else had had those exact same issues. I no longer felt like I was making something up in my mind and finally was able to see the problem for what it was. Understanding that others were in the same place as me had never been as apparent as it had been until I checked this thing out. I was finally able to stop thinking the problems I was dealing with were a joke and that I should just "get over it"

#164 Posted by dvorak (1497 posts) -

@optimusprime223: you should not recommend this article to people with depression for a multitude of reasons listed here by many people in the comments.

#165 Posted by AssInAss (2669 posts) -

I've been mentioning this game to others for a while, glad to see it get coverage. It's probably the most nuanced examination of depression we're going to get in a video game. I've felt many of the same things that are mentioned in it, especially the procrastination part and sleeping problems.

Great article, and a game worth talking about. Thanks, Jennifer, Zoe Quinn, and @patrickklepek.

#166 Posted by dvorak (1497 posts) -

@mordeaniischaos said:

I hope at the very least it was made by people who truly understand depression (ie people who suffered from depression for more than a couple weeks after a bad fucking breakup or whatever. That's not at all the same thing as chronic depression, which is mad bad.)

The problem is that people think that being really down in the dumps for a few weeks is actual depression. Which is to say that it's not. That's just going through the human experience.

#167 Posted by MordeaniisChaos (5730 posts) -

@dvorak said:

@mordeaniischaos said:

I hope at the very least it was made by people who truly understand depression (ie people who suffered from depression for more than a couple weeks after a bad fucking breakup or whatever. That's not at all the same thing as chronic depression, which is mad bad.)

The problem is that people think that being really down in the dumps for a few weeks is actual depression. Which is to say that it's not. That's just going through the human experience.

"Problem" is probably the wrong word, as it's probably for the best lol. But yes, most people are pretty quick to announce "UGH I'M SUFFERING FROM DEPRESSION."
I've suffered from depression for most of my life. Chronic depression is way different from just being unhappy.

#168 Posted by Kaowas (124 posts) -

Good stuff Patrick!

I'm sure that Depression Quest is an amazing and well-thought game; however, I'll probably never play it. Like a lot of people I suffer from depression (I've been diagnosed with depression), and recently I've been feeling insanely burned out by school and work and all the other things I do. To battle this, I surround myself with friends, play a crazy amount of videogames, and do other escapist activities like writing. I do a lot of writing. I'm working on my novel and doing script work for a show my friend is looking to get off the ground. Also I write poetry... which is really quite typical when I think about it (depressed poet writing about infinity and beauty, etc.). Depression Quest may hit too close to home for my tastes, like why I can't get past the first season of Breaking Bad; but I do want to play the game. It's just that I don't think I could get into it without sinking further into worries. I think when my head is in a better place I'll play this game.

#169 Edited by nERVEcenter (183 posts) -

Glad this exists. After going through a thankfully short period of depression while at college, which I mostly solved by extricating myself and working in my hometown, it's a relief to see someone trying to convey what it's really like to live with such a psychological...disorder. And that's really what it felt like.

The reason I can appreciate such an effort is because I know plenty of the kind of people who will NEVER understand it. Extroverted people who party hard, work hard, always push the limits, who I made a big mistake in asking for help to adapt to a lifestyle more "healthy" like theirs. Not only did they completely fail to understand the situation I was in, but by trying to pull me out, they put me in extremely uncomfortable situations in which I floundered and made them look bad; eventually they dismissed it as some freak abnormality that I was failing to pull out of because I wasn't "being positive and just doing," and proceeded to berate me for being such a hopeless wreck.

Seek professional help when trying to solve depression, or this could be you. Thankfully, I didn't have many connections while up in college, so I was able to almost completely remove myself from that situation like a life that's passed me by, and at my two jobs at home I've made good friends and have improved my mood and outlook drastically.

#170 Posted by Branthog (5583 posts) -

I've been thinking about making a game about what it's like to have OCD. This stuff is inspiring.

Go look at @video_game_king 's posting count. Build your game around that concept. I imagine that is a lot like what OCD must be like. :P

#171 Posted by SomeJerk (3305 posts) -

I wish I could create a game demonstrating fibromyalgia.

#172 Posted by mrpandaman (866 posts) -

I understand that it's a somewhat naive proposition, but wouldn't it be better to create a game that gives players hope through other means then "hey you're depressed, don't worry you're not alone!"

Why create a game that has no endgame and just leaves the player in a down mood afterwords? Wouldn't be more clever to have a character who is suffering from depression, and goes through hardships, but by the end finds some measure of peace in a way that is beneficial.

I mean yeah, it's not the most realistic thing when you have your game character who is suffering from depression, overcome it to some degree by the end, but it's smarter and sends a better message. I mean like the article says, depression is something that most people have or aware of; 1 in 10 people in fact. So it's not like people are unaware of the problem.

I think it's smarter to come up with a story that draws empathy from the player and makes them aware of the issues, but tries to present a hopeful outcome. If not a solution, then a message, "this character was able to find some peace, and perhaps you can to." It's harder, but smarter. I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing, when so many people know from experience that it is a thing. How about trying to make those people feel better.

The game exists to have people understand what it is like to have depression. The point is not to show that "happy ending" because in a way it makes it seem that depression is easily beatable. Depression isn't easily beatable, and it can be very hard to overcome. Having that more hopeful positive ending you seem to want, downplays in a way all the hardships before.

Basically what @alphadormante said.

#173 Posted by Throat (48 posts) -

I "played" depression quest. It was just like my life except the guy had a girlfriend and got invited out to social activities.

Imagine depression quest without any social interaction and you get my life. yay :/

FML

#174 Posted by mac1975 (1 posts) -

I have been suffering from depression for 8 years now. At first I didn't belive it when my doctor said I needed some anti-depressants. I was overwhelmed!. But after that I have come to see that I have been overworked. That took me the most of my middle life.After that I enjoy the simpler forms of life, like being out for a walk and I have noticed a big improvement. That said, i like to give all the support to the people who need.

#175 Posted by MisterSims (19 posts) -

Just about everything in this game was accurate to my life, and i guess solidified the fact that i am depressed - due to the similarities of the actions presented in the game, in contrast with the decisions i make in my own life. To be honest, it feels like someone has hijacked my brain and created a game from it. I can only say, that this knowledge had to come from experience, and therefore, i commend the creators on finally working and completing their creative passion project... a task that many with depression struggle to do. I've emailed the link to a friend, in the hopes that they might complete the game, and without explaining my own personal feelings, they can understand me better. It certainly was an experience.

#176 Edited by TomA (2531 posts) -

Fuck ya!!! I beat depression, +100 points. G G G G GIRLFRIEND BONUS!!!

#177 Posted by masternater27 (918 posts) -

Thanks for this Patrick. Played through the game this morning and it definitely made me tear up from how accurate certain scenarios were. I feel a lot of the frustrations presented about communicating my depression to partners and close friends. Going to send this out to a couple of them and have a discussion afterwards.

#178 Posted by Generic_username (629 posts) -

Thanks for this, Patrick. Pointing me towards this game might be the thing that leads to me actually getting the help I didn't realize I needed until playing it.

#179 Edited by eccentrix (1594 posts) -

@sor_eddie said:

I'm also not really sure why you kept referring to your character's boyfriend, since he's a straight guy and Alex is a girl.

I don't remember anything in the game saying the character was male. "You are a mid-twenties human being."

@rebgav said:

The 'game' seems well-meaning and all but the writing has a one-note amateurish feel and the music is quite overbearing.

I think it was meant to be. It said it was linked to the "gameplay" and I don't remember it ever changing, so I think it was supposed to make it difficult to concentrate, etc. It worked for me; I had to mute it just to get through the reading.

#180 Posted by CaptainTightPants (2834 posts) -

It starts a bit rough, limiting you to the more "depressing" choices, but things start getting better for the character towards the end, and that gradual change got a bit of a response from me.

The thing is, I don't know if it really helped me to understand depression all that much. The overall presentation just sort of makes it fall flat.

I think depression is an interesting subject to tackle in video games, but I don't think that a text game, or this one for that matter, is really going to do it justice.

#181 Edited by LiquidPrince (16020 posts) -

@alphadormante: @mrpandaman: I'm not saying the game should have a happy ending. I'm saying that I think it would be more beneficial if it ended in a way that gave people hope. It's tough to accomplish without sounding pedantic, but that is what would make it better. Coming up with a way to express the difficulties of depression, but having a hopeful conclusion.

I just don't think people need another thing to tell them they're depressed. Enough people suffer from depression. 1 in 10. Like I said, I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing, when so many people know from experience that it is a thing. How about trying to make those people feel better.

#182 Edited by rebgav (1429 posts) -

@rebgav said:

The 'game' seems well-meaning and all but the writing has a one-note amateurish feel and the music is quite overbearing.

I think it was meant to be. It said it was linked to the "gameplay" and I don't remember it ever changing, so I think it was supposed to make it difficult to concentrate, etc. It worked for me; I had to mute it just to get through the reading.

I found that the music made it difficult to concentrate on the text too, and while I understand that is probably the point it's a little counterproductive when the entire experience is text-based. As a stylistic decision it makes sense, from a usability perspective it does not.

#183 Edited by BiohazardBlaze (41 posts) -

@alphadormante: @mrpandaman: I'm not saying the game should have a happy ending. I'm saying that I think it would be more beneficial if it ended in a way that gave people hope. It's tough to accomplish without sounding pedantic, but that is what would make it better. Coming up with a way to express the difficulties of depression, but having a hopeful conclusion.

I just don't think people need another thing to tell them they're depressed. Enough people suffer from depression. 1 in 10. Like I said, I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing, when so many people know from experience that it is a thing. How about trying to make those people feel better.

I think personally, the type of ending that you are talking about would have invalidated the entire game for me.

Had the player character ended on a more positive note, I think it would have thoroughly gone of the rails for me because that's simply not what my experiences with depression have been like. The sombre ending that lacks any obvious hope is a much more appropriate and poignant ending than what you're talking about.

I feel that a more uplifting ending would have strayed into an area of almost fantasy. The ending of Depression Quest is comparable to what it can feel like for a person with depression. I think of the people with depression who play this, more will have an experience similar to the games ending as it stands than they would otherwise.

When you say:

Enough people suffer from depression. 1 in 10. Like I said, I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing...

I think you've stumbled across an active point the game is trying to make. That frustration(?) or feeling of futility or pointlessness is a very real feeling many people with depression have.

In my opinion, the lack of resolution and it's open ended experience that lacks too fine a point, is a far more realistic simulation of depression, which by the games own admission is one of its goals.

A more uplifting ending may feel like it would be more inspirational, but is ultimately an idea that I feel opposes the illness the game is trying to articulate. Sometimes, a lot of the time, you do not get better.

#184 Edited by mrpandaman (866 posts) -

@liquidprince: As with the other 9 in 10 people who don't suffer from depression and might not have ever experienced depression, it's important to understand that depression is not as easy to get rid of as just playing the game. Knowing that someone made a game about depression and it's a game that a lot of people are really connecting and responding to, it can let a person suffering from depression know that they're not alone; someone who understands what they are going through. While the more hopeful ending may seem more beneficial, I think it may cheapen what the game is actually trying to achieve.

That is why the game's most positive ending still has room for an instance of relapse and that most hopeful and positive solution the game offers is enough. That ending the player is able to achieve, the character is handling and managing his/her depression better and is making strides toward recover. You want people to know that it is a long battle, but if you can find the help you need and the people to support you it is a lot more manageable. It's really not trying to make people feel good, it's really just about what depression can feel like and having people understand that.

As I keep saying, the game is about understanding not trying to make people feel better. You have to leave the book open for relapse, because it is always possible. A person may think they have beaten depression, but maybe a few months later they fall into the same pattern that triggered their depression without realizing it. That is another reason why I don't think it could have the more positive message/ending that you seem to want.

#185 Posted by linus_south (148 posts) -
@milkman said:

@tjuk said:

OK that's it, I have to say it:

Fuck this kind namby-pamby indie game.

I'm sick of all the games in recent years that want to make me "feel" something. Just shut up. I'm 33 years old, I've been been playing video games my whole life and am certainly a million miles from being a "bro gamer". I'm looking for interesting game mechanics as much as the next gamer.

I swear it's crap like this that makes people crave a game that just gives them a gun and something to shoot at.

FUCK FEELINGS LET'S SHOOT SOME SHIT WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

If it's not the video game equivalent of the sex scene from Tetsuo: The iron man, The lawn mower scene from Dead Alive, Or A bloodier more explosion filled version of saving private ryan mixed with transformers, I DON'T WANT IT! FEELINGS ARE FOR ASSHOLES! *I've shot shit for nearly 3 decades now I'd like something new...

#186 Posted by ripelivejam (4315 posts) -

@ripelivejam said:

@fallen189 said:

It's kind of stupid how any loser who is addicted to the internet throws around the term "I'm so depressed" when they really mean lethargic/apathetic

if you're generalizing most/everyone who is depressed as "simply" a lazy person that's pretty sickening.

lethargy is a clear symptom of depression. people idle away their time if they feel stuck somewhere in their lives, use it as a means of escape or deferring their troubles. from personal experience i would say a depressed person typically want more than anything to overcome their own lack of willingness to engage life.

but thanks for finally finding the solution to "depression!" you'll make millions happy i'm sure.

I used to have such severe depression and anxiety that I couldnt leave the house, and lost my job, while also failing my first year of university. You're putting words in my mouth by implying that I'm claiming "All depressed people are actually just lazy". I'm referring more to the kinds of people who are just marginally sad, and want ANY EXCUSE to self diagnose themselves with chronic depression. But whatever, jump down my throat more, please.

ok i didn't mean to marginalize your situation and i'm sorry, though you weren't very clear in your first post. i've been to therapy a few years back and was prescribed antidepressants (didn't take with me, but i regret not sticking with it), and i suppose i haven't been officially diagnosed but i'm fairly certain i would be if i went to a psychiatrist today. for some very real illnesses some people try to dismiss it as trying to make a medical diagnosis out of everything, like as you said laziness/lethargy or the like, or with ADD and a child's inability to hold their attention on schoolwork. i think depression is a very real thing for a lot of people and with my supposed personal experience i'm probably overly sensitive about it, so sorry that i misconstrued your comment as some sort of generalization. here's hoping you were able to overcome the worst of it.

#187 Posted by LiquidPrince (16020 posts) -

@liquidprince said:

@alphadormante: @mrpandaman: I'm not saying the game should have a happy ending. I'm saying that I think it would be more beneficial if it ended in a way that gave people hope. It's tough to accomplish without sounding pedantic, but that is what would make it better. Coming up with a way to express the difficulties of depression, but having a hopeful conclusion.

I just don't think people need another thing to tell them they're depressed. Enough people suffer from depression. 1 in 10. Like I said, I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing, when so many people know from experience that it is a thing. How about trying to make those people feel better.

I think personally, the type of ending that you are talking about would have invalidated the entire game for me.

Had the player character ended on a more positive note, I think it would have thoroughly gone of the rails for me because that's simply not what my experiences with depression have been like. The sombre ending that lacks any obvious hope is a much more appropriate and poignant ending than what you're talking about.

I feel that a more uplifting ending would have strayed into an area of almost fantasy. The ending of Depression Quest is comparable to what it can feel like for a person with depression. I think of the people with depression who play this, more will have an experience similar to the games ending as it stands than they would otherwise.

When you say:

Enough people suffer from depression. 1 in 10. Like I said, I see no benefit in merely informing people that depression is a thing...

I think you've stumbled across an active point the game is trying to make. That frustration(?) or feeling of futility or pointlessness is a very real feeling many people with depression have.

In my opinion, the lack of resolution and it's open ended experience that lacks too fine a point, is a far more realistic simulation of depression, which by the games own admission is one of its goals.

A more uplifting ending may feel like it would be more inspirational, but is ultimately an idea that I feel opposes the illness the game is trying to articulate. Sometimes, a lot of the time, you do not get better.

And so what is the game ultimately achieving? People who have depression know that they have deppression and what that feels like. Someone who doesn't have depression will look at this "game" and most likely say "well that's ridiculous" or they won't even try and play it. And the game doesn't try to present any solutions. So what is the ultimate goal of this "products" existence? To make people with depression feel better by saying "hey don't worry, there are other depressed people in the world as well?"

I'm not being snide here. I'm actually trying to get it. I just don't see the point in a product that doesn't attempt to say anything.

#189 Edited by mrpandaman (866 posts) -

And so what is the game ultimately achieving? People who have depression know that they have deppression and what that feels like. Someone who doesn't have depression will look at this "game" and most likely say "well that's ridiculous" or they won't even try and play it. And the game doesn't try to present any solutions. So what is the ultimate goal of this "products" existence? To make people with depression feel better by saying "hey don't worry, there are other depressed people in the world as well?"

I'm not being snide here. I'm actually trying to get it. I just don't see the point in a product that doesn't attempt to say anything.

I think you're just really missing the point. It's to provide perspective to those who have not experienced it, not to self-diagnose or to make someone feel better about depression. You're criticizing it for something it never intended to be or what you wanted it to be and because of that, I don't think you can see the point.

From Depressionquest.com first screen it says:

You are given a series of everyday life events and have to attempt to manage your illness, relationships, job, and possible treatment. This game aims to show other sufferers of depression that they are not alone in their feelings, and to illustrate to people who may not understand the illness the depths of what it can do to people.

#190 Edited by JackiJinx (3091 posts) -

Glad I saw this article. That Jennifer girl is quite similar to myself. And I have a family member that just completely denies depression is a thing. The world is wonderful.

I'm just glad I've been able to cope with it so well the past so many years without any therapy or medication. Been there, done that, but just am not doing that right now.

#191 Edited by MATATAT (341 posts) -

The people I've shown this game who've struggled with depression have given me amazing feedback on this game. Thanks for bringing more light to it Patrick.

#192 Posted by agemyth (93 posts) -

@tjuk said:

@rebgav: The game doesn't offend me, I don't need to play it if I don't want to. No video game offends me regardless of it's content (well, a game where the aim was to kill my children would offend me, so scratch that).

I mean games like this just aren't what I'm looking for. I see more and more stuff like this these days and it just turns me off.

We don't have to agree on this, I'm just giving my opinion. Most of the comments so far on this article have been very positive. I don't think it hurts the discussion for someone to give an alternative view.

It did offend you because you got so angry about something on the internet simply existing and being discussed in a non-negative manner that you had to come in and write a comment to dish out your own form of internet justice and take a dump on it. A rational and reasonable human being would realize that Depression Quest is not for them and avoid the article and/or comments. You should have just moved on with your life.

And as I type that, I remember that is what I do with people that say terrible things in comments sections on the internet.

Note: I only read page 1 of comments.

#193 Edited by Brenderous (1105 posts) -

@branthog said:

@brenderous said:

I've been thinking about making a game about what it's like to have OCD. This stuff is inspiring.

Go look at @video_game_king 's posting count. Build your game around that concept. I imagine that is a lot like what OCD must be like. :P

Probably:P I only have experience with the "afraid of germs everywhere" kind of OCD. But there's a few different ways it manifests. DLC?

#194 Edited by Dan_CiTi (3379 posts) -

@branthog said:

@brenderous said:

I've been thinking about making a game about what it's like to have OCD. This stuff is inspiring.

Go look at @video_game_king 's posting count. Build your game around that concept. I imagine that is a lot like what OCD must be like. :P

Probably:P I only have experience with the "afraid of germs everywhere" kind of OCD. But there's a few different ways it manifests. DLC?

They beat you to it.

#195 Posted by Brenderous (1105 posts) -

@dan_citi said:

@brenderous said:

@branthog said:

@brenderous said:

I've been thinking about making a game about what it's like to have OCD. This stuff is inspiring.

Go look at @video_game_king 's posting count. Build your game around that concept. I imagine that is a lot like what OCD must be like. :P

Probably:P I only have experience with the "afraid of germs everywhere" kind of OCD. But there's a few different ways it manifests. DLC?

They beat you to it.

DAMNIT

#196 Edited by Carlos1408 (1526 posts) -

Thanks for the article Patrick! I had a go and played the game; would never have heard about it if it weren't for your article. I've been struggling with depression for the last few months myself, when talking to professionals they are quite certain that it has stemmed from my PTSD (amongst other reasons). I've been proactively doing things to smooth things out and am a lot better now.

I was actually having quite an off day today, but playing the game actually made me feel quite a bit better. It gave me hope and reminded me that I'm doing quite well. Anyways, I'm done procrastinating, I'm going to tackle my coursework some more.

#197 Edited by HerbieBug (4212 posts) -

@sweep: Clinical depression is kind of a different thing than the common colloquial (mis)usage of term 'depression'. Feeling sad or dejected is not a necessary component. The things you want to look out for are; loss of interest in activities you normally enjoy, poor concentration, withdrawal from your normal social activities, reduced sex drive, suicidal ideation etc. There are a few depression screening tests online that you can take if you're concerned this may be a problem for you. Or, better yet, consult with your physician.

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