So how exactly was this different from the first 4 games?

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#101 Posted by GunslingerPanda (4859 posts) -

Well it's a lot more juvenile.

#102 Posted by Dixavd (1380 posts) -

I played it for the pretty colours and Ninja Theory's animation. I enjoyed it.

#103 Posted by Oscar__Explosion (2432 posts) -

I've only played the first two stages of DmC but the one thing I really don't like about it compaired to the older games is it's lack of lock-on. Other than that it's been a solid game.

#104 Posted by JBG4 (439 posts) -

DMC was really good...

#105 Edited by Rafaelfc (1470 posts) -

I didn't play much of the old ones. But I really like DmC, thought the action was great, level design was truly inspired and the cinematic aspect of it was really well done (albeit very cheesy).

#106 Posted by dudeglove (8308 posts) -

Some people really just don't like their gay cowboy being messed with. However we're going for outright differences:

- The main biggy is that the depth of DmC's combat is nowhere near either that of DMC3 or DMC4. By "depth", about as far as it goes is, well, jump cancelling (look it up). Luckily, due to the combat mechanics with the demon/angel whip thingies, DmC ends up as a lot more "airborne" compared to previous games and as such it's significantly more agile (by that I mean you're flying all over the place when you get a good rhythm going) than its predecessors.

- Unfortunately, bar usage of the devil trigger, there are some specific enemies in DmC that have to be killed with either angel or devil weapons, and it's fucking infuriating. Luckily, you always have these weapons equipped anyway, but it really goes against the legacy of the series that encouraged (or at least allowed for) some sort of variety in your weapon loadout.

- DmC does have a lock on of sorts, certainly for the firearms, but it's more a 'soft' lock on rather than the hard snap-to of the old which also had a reticule.

- DmC's bosses are more about spectacle than actual skill in that Ninja Theory veered into God of War territory. However, what little there is Quick Time Event-ish stuff, it's nowhere near as bad as the shit Bayonetta tried to pull (i.e. "Press X To Not Die").

- It's nowhere near as punishing or demanding on your reactions as previous titles, and you can get to SSS rank by pretty much just mashing your way through, even on Dante Must Die difficulty. DMC3, on the other hand, was absolutely notorious for its difficulty. Starting off the first level on normal could result in you stunlocked to death in the space of about four successive hits if you weren't careful.

- The level design is far more straightforward, whereas DMC1-4 occasionally suffered from "We're still not sure if we're making Resident Evil or not" syndrome. To add to its many sins, DMC4 literally had you backtrack through the same set of levels in reverse order halfway through the game. With DmC, they threw in a few different things to mix things up (nightclub level was a lot of fun, as well as the matrix time stop car chasey one), rather than just wandering around a dingy Gothic castle.

- It's still not as bad as DMC2.

Thematically, and this is, like, my opinion man but DmC is really not that different to the previous games. There's still a big bad to beat (wait, who or what was the antagonist in DMC2?), Dante throws a bunch of wisecracks at various demons and meets some girl in the process, Vergil does what Vergil does, shit blows up in the second act, and then Dante pulls it together to save the day. Pretty much standard fare across the board for every single DMC game, except DMC2 (seriously I still can't remember what that game was about).

Judging from what I read, if the OP thinks they'll get more of the same after enjoying DmC, he's in for a rather nasty surprise with the previous games. There's a great difference in overall difficulty between the new Dante and the old Dante. That said, DMC3 is still an absolutely fantastic title whose praises can't be sung high enough (except for maybe the tedious boss gauntlet towards the end), and objectively DMC4 is still decent despite the fact I think it's absolutely goddamn horrendous on several levels and Nero should be killed with fire.

The main question is, as a veteran of all the previous games, did I enjoy DmC? Yup.

#107 Posted by TheAcidSkull (763 posts) -

@yummylee said:
  • Vastly different art style. A lot more seedy and colourful as opposed to the older games' more gothic look.
  • Think there's pretty much only a single puzzle in the entire game, whereas puzzles where surprisingly prominent in the older ones.
  • No lock-on.
  • No Styles system, although a lot of those abilities were incorporated into Dante's general moveset.

I think a lot of what it comes down to is the combat that really turned people away, like the lack of a lock-on, enemies that restrict you to using a particular weapon rather than allowing you to consistently mix it up however you want, it being significantly easier to score S ranks, and the boss battles, while they look flashy, are mediocre compared to the stuff found in DMC3 & 4. That, and DmC's unlockable weapons pale against the creativity and personality of the stuff you found in the older games.

I say all this as someone that still enjoyed my time with DmC, though, and think it made a lot of improvements pertaining to the aesthetic, soundtrack, story, and Dante in particular was a huge improvement over the nigh-unbearable DMC4 Dante. But I still vastly prefer the core gameplay in DMC3 & 4 overall. There's a sense of impact in DMC4 especially that I found a little lacking in DmC. Playing as Nero is perhaps the most fun I've had across the whole series.

What was Wrong with Dante in the fourth installment?

#108 Edited by Humanity (10137 posts) -

@yummylee said:
  • Vastly different art style. A lot more seedy and colourful as opposed to the older games' more gothic look.
  • Think there's pretty much only a single puzzle in the entire game, whereas puzzles where surprisingly prominent in the older ones.
  • No lock-on.
  • No Styles system, although a lot of those abilities were incorporated into Dante's general moveset.

I think a lot of what it comes down to is the combat that really turned people away, like the lack of a lock-on, enemies that restrict you to using a particular weapon rather than allowing you to consistently mix it up however you want, it being significantly easier to score S ranks, and the boss battles, while they look flashy, are mediocre compared to the stuff found in DMC3 & 4. That, and DmC's unlockable weapons pale against the creativity and personality of the stuff you found in the older games.

I say all this as someone that still enjoyed my time with DmC, though, and think it made a lot of improvements pertaining to the aesthetic, soundtrack, story, and Dante in particular was a huge improvement over the nigh-unbearable DMC4 Dante. But I still vastly prefer the core gameplay in DMC3 & 4 overall. There's a sense of impact in DMC4 especially that I found a little lacking in DmC. Playing as Nero is perhaps the most fun I've had across the whole series.

What was Wrong with Dante in the fourth installment?

Don't even ask, slowly start backing away before the thread stirs. If we, as the Giant Bomb community, have learned one thing over the years - it's that whenever you discuss Devil May Cry in relation to the newest DmC reboot, no one wins.

#109 Posted by TheAcidSkull (763 posts) -

@humanity: ...........

Okay.............just wanted to confirm whether i should pick it up or...never mind.

#110 Posted by Humanity (10137 posts) -
#111 Posted by TheAcidSkull (763 posts) -

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