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Introduction

From the Evasive Space Website, www.evasivespace.com :
Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder WHERE you are... The universe is going dark and it's up to you Konki, Stellar Guardian, to put things right. Dr. Dark Matter and his roving band of space thieves have stolen many of the Constellation Stones that make up the heavens. Some stones have been sold to unscrupulous space types while others were lost during the getaway. Whatever the situation, you must come through. Suit-up, power-up, and live up to the task at hand. Recover the lost Constellation Stones and once again bring light to the night sky."
A top down shooter with a heavy sci-fi atmosphere, Evasive Space is brought to you by High Voltage Games, developers of Leisure Suit Larry: Magna Cum Laude, and of the Wii first person shooter, The Conduit. The game takes place in a futuristic world where the player must pilot his ship through 20 different time-challenge or item-collection based levels. Players take on the role of Konki, a "Stellar Guardian" who must retrieve the constellation stones which have been stolen by Dr. Dark Matter and his gang of "Space Thieves".

Gameplay

Evasive Space is a top-down shooter with 3D graphics powered by High Voltage Software's Quantum3 game engine. To pilot Konki's ship, the player moves an on screen reticule in the direction they wish to go, and then press the B button to power the ship's throttle. The farther away the reticule is from the ship itself, the faster it will go. In any given level, the player will either have to collect a certain number of objects or make it through the level before time runs out. Piloting the ship does take some practice, though, as certain objects may prove to be deadly to run into, and if the player hits a wall his/her ship will be rendered immovable for a few seconds. The ship also has a "tethering" ability that allows it to tow objects, which can be used to move derelict ships or mines out of its path. Different objects have different functions, and the player will have to know which ones to collect in order to be successful. Your ship needs energy, which can be collected in cells hidden throughout the various levels and is depleted each time you hit a wall or object. In addition to these, players will also collect upgrades for their ship, time extensions that rewind the game clock, and space travelers who are in need of rescuing.

Pickups

  • Energy Cells, which come in three types (I, II, and III), each restoring a different amount of energy  to the ship.
  • Diodes, which can be used to upgrade the ship every time the player collects 10.
  • Chronospheres, which increase the total time a player has to complete the mission.
  • Stranded Spacers, which are space travelers who need to be rescued in some missions.
  • Derelict Ships, which the player will have to tow a certain number to a space station in some missions.

Upgrades

For each 10 diodes the player collects, an upgrade will be unlocked. According to the developer, the ship in fact "comes" with these "upgrades already installed, and merely needs the energy in the diodes to activate them. The six upgrades, in the order they can be unlocked, are:
  1. Inertial Field Generator (I-Shield) -- A player activated shield that temporarily guards the ship from objects, walls, and enemy fire. Drains Energy as it is used.
  2. Gravitational Field Generator (G-Magnet) -- An upgrade that pulls pickups in your nearby vicinity to the ship, making them easier to collect.
  3. Double Redundant Propulsion System (DRPS) -- Shortens the recovery time of your ship after you hit objects, allowing you to speed back up faster.
  4. Teslic Engine Enhancement (TEE) -- Decreases the energy consumption of your ship.
  5. Ohmic Suppression Module (OSM) -- Gives your ship the ability to accelerate faster.
  6. Zero-G Thruster System (ZTS) -- Increases the ship's overall performance and handling.

Plot

The plot of Evasive Space revolves around the player retrieving the "Constelation Stones" as mentioned earlier, as well as various side missions that appear along the way. Only High Voltage games can truly do the plot justice, so in addition to the previous statement, here are a few more words from the game's website concerning the plot:
"You will travel to the farthest reaches of the galaxy, braving some of the most dangerous elements and facing some incredible obstacles. The Constellation Stones could be anywhere so prepare for flight through asteroid fields and gaseous planetary rings, as well as through the labyrinth-like space caves and space stations. Narrow corridors, mining drills, steam pipes, debris, gaseous entities, space worms, and of course Dr. Dark Matter's traps are just some of the threats to your ship. Be prepared for anything.Finally, understand that others have tried and have not been heard from, so you may be tasked with other secondary objectives such as saving derelict spacemen, recovering stranded space crafts, collecting valuable energy resources, and more on your journey."
There you have it. No doubt and exiting and thought-provoking story with numerous socio-economic undertones. Oh, and remember:

"They're Counting on YOU!"

Multiplayer

In addition to the single player campaign, the game will feature a full-fledged local multiplayer component. Players can team up with three friends and take on the six different game modes:
  1. Hero Timed Mode, where players race against the clock to fulfill their objective.
  2. Hero Point Total Mode, where the players compete against each other to rescue the most Stranded Spacers.
  3. Hero Team Player Mode, where all the players contribute to one score. The game is ended when any one of the players dies.
  4. Collector Timed Mode, where players race against the clock to fulfill their objective.*
  5. Collector Point Total Mode, where the players compete against each other to rescue the most Stranded Spacers.*
  6. Collector Team Player Mode, where all the players contribute to one score. The game is ended when any one of the players dies.*
Also, the game includes a Nintendo Wi-Fi connect leaderboard tool, which lets players see how they stack up against others on any of the single player levels.
*It is unclear what the difference is between Collector and Hero multiplayer modes, but they are separate, distinct gameplay styles.

Pricing and Release

  • United States
February 16, 2009: 1000 Wii Points
  • Japan
April 7th 2009: 1000 Wii Points

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