#1 Edited by Rxanadu (503 posts) -

I'll just get to the point: do you think the Constants and Variables speech also was a commentary on the state of game sequels and how they tend to ultimately have the same elements of prior entries into a said series? About the constants and variables: do you think there is more to this concept than within the game itself?

I may have thought to much about it, but it would make more sense this way. I can't see the people at Irrational Games using the scene at Rapture without thinking about how this game was very similar to the previous two entries into the Bioshock series. Whether it's the Vigors, the Handymen/Songbird, or the three constants Elizabeth spoke of at the end, these elements seem too specific of game design choices to not have some overlying message about something aside from the game itself.

I'm not trying to say the entire game was a commentary on the game industry; it may only be a quick nod to the overall nature of sequels in most entertainment media. But the more you think about the history of the development of this game, whether it be the choice of box art, the ad campaign before its release, or even the initial reveal of the game to the general public, you have to wonder if Irrational was trying to say something about how sequels (at least in terms of games) are handled as of late.

#3 Edited by Dagbiker (6939 posts) -

I don't think so, but if it adds to your enjoyment of the game, Ill say yes.

I also am going to resist saying "Look at you hacker..."

#4 Edited by Dalai (6978 posts) -

The ending is complex enough as it is. Does it really need this extra layer of meaning?

#5 Posted by JasonR86 (9582 posts) -

I hate to be that guy but it means whatever you want it to mean. In a way, the story reminds me of a Dear Esther in the way that what is implied and vaguely hinted at is more meaningful then what is explained. All of the ambiguity is filled in by the player however they chose. So, in that way, the story is as meaningful and as complicated as the person viewing the story wishes to make it.

#6 Posted by killacam (1284 posts) -

I kind of just assumed this was the case. Seems pretty clear. I'm surprised that the above posters don't necessarily agree with you.

#7 Edited by JasonR86 (9582 posts) -

@killacam said:

I kind of just assumed this was the case. Seems pretty clear. I'm surprised that the above posters don't necessarily agree with you.

I don't know. I don't agree or disagree. I don't think that this is a story that has one ultimately interpretation that is absolutely perfect. Which I think is awesome. I would prefer if more stories did that.

#8 Posted by Rxanadu (503 posts) -

@jasonr86: Oddly enough, after reading an article denying any connections the game may have had with concepts such as anit-Christianity and pro-Communism, I'm inclined to see the ending more with a see-what-you-will interpretation. Although I still hold toward my argument of the game commenting on the nature of most game sequels, I understand most people see the game's ending in a different light.

I'm actually interested in seeing what more people think about the game's ending and what message they got out of it, if any.

#9 Posted by killacam (1284 posts) -

@jasonr86 said:

@killacam said:

I kind of just assumed this was the case. Seems pretty clear. I'm surprised that the above posters don't necessarily agree with you.

I don't know. I don't agree or disagree. I don't think that this is a story that has one ultimately interpretation that is absolutely perfect. Which I think is awesome. I would prefer if more stories did that.

That's true. The game certainly supports many different interpretations simultaneously.