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#1 Edited by Abendlaender (2768 posts) -

When did that happen and why did nobody inform me? Am I just a crazy guy running around tipping and everybody is just looks at me and sighs "There comes Tipping Tommy again. That guy is just crazy" (Note: My name is actually not Tommy).

But seriously I was kinda baffled when Patrick mentioned this, in fact I even looked up "to tip" just to be sure I'm not an idiot. And now I need to know: Where is this true? I live in Austria and we usually do tip at restaurants (did Patrick mean tipping at supermarkets or bakeries? Do you do that in the US?). Is Austria just crazy or what is going on? If you live somewhere else in Europe, please tell me if you normally tip or not.

#2 Posted by alternate (2688 posts) -

He was talking about Germany specifically. I can't speak to that. I know in the UK tipping culture isn't like the US - where it is expected - but it is far from offensive.

#3 Posted by MariachiMacabre (7056 posts) -

I've never been to Europe but I have heard from people who have been (specifically they were in Germany.) and they said tipping was frowned upon.

#4 Edited by Kidable (127 posts) -

In Ireland, I've never paid for food at a resteraunt for myself yet because I'm not a crazy person, but they include tips in food delivery. And general other things. However, I *do* subscribe to the Steve Buscemi philosophy of tipping in this scene

#5 Posted by Optix12 (611 posts) -

I rarely eat out in the UK but isnt it pretty commonplace to see a "service charge" on the bill in lieu of tipping (which is sucky as that money wont really go the actual waiting staff)

#6 Posted by Eidderf (506 posts) -

@alternate: Yes, basically a tip is usually expected in a more fancy restaurant or something like that in the UK, but that's the only time it's really required or that common from my experience at least. I always find it weird that it seems quite common in America to tip the guy delivering you fast food, I don't think I've ever seen anyone do that (but maybe I just hang around with a bunch of people influenced by Scrooge McDuck growing up or something)

#7 Posted by SomeJerk (3158 posts) -

Always been tipping in Sweden. In good team-buildy comfortable places it ends up in one big jar (virtual or not) that the waiting staff split.

#8 Edited by insaneTJ (28 posts) -

When I lived in Germany I never needed nor was I expected to tip.

#9 Edited by alternate (2688 posts) -

@eidderf said:

@alternate: Yes, basically a tip is usually expected in a more fancy restaurant or something like that in the UK, but that's the only time it's really required or that common from my experience at least. I always find it weird that it seems quite common in America to tip the guy delivering you fast food, I don't think I've ever seen anyone do that (but maybe I just hang around with a bunch of people influenced by Scrooge McDuck growing up or something)

I think the reason tipping takeaway delivery and waitresses is seen as important in the US is that their minimum wage (state dependent) is usually not nearly enough for the person to earn a working wage. Kinda defeats the point of having a minimum wage IMO.

#10 Posted by ZeForgotten (10397 posts) -

Always be tipping.
At least I do it here in Denmark when I eat at a fancy restaurant (which, if I'm out eating, that's where I go, because standards)

#11 Posted by Abendlaender (2768 posts) -

@insanetj said:

When I lived in Germany I never needed nor was I expected to tip.

Well, yeah sure. It's not something you NEED to do but most people I know do tip (if the service isn't complete garbage). But I have never seen anybody feel "insulted" when you tip them (I also spent some time in Germany)

#12 Posted by Fattony12000 (7093 posts) -

Yup, us bloody poms getting right proper bopped up by those ruddy yanks.

Final Fantasy

  • JP December 17, 1987
  • NA July 12, 1990
  • PAL March 14, 2003

Chrono Trigger

  • JP March 11, 1995
  • NA August 22, 1995
  • EU February 6, 2009

EarthBound

  • JP August 27, 1994
  • NA June 5, 1995
  • EU Late 2013
#13 Posted by Tennmuerti (8012 posts) -

In Cyprus tipping in restaurants is commonplace, while not necessary, it's just good manners to tip. While tipping for delivery is not expected nor done.

And having traveled around half the European countries no one was ever offended at a tip in any of them, in Germany neither.

#14 Edited by Jazzycola (662 posts) -

@alternate said:

@eidderf said:

@alternate: Yes, basically a tip is usually expected in a more fancy restaurant or something like that in the UK, but that's the only time it's really required or that common from my experience at least. I always find it weird that it seems quite common in America to tip the guy delivering you fast food, I don't think I've ever seen anyone do that (but maybe I just hang around with a bunch of people influenced by Scrooge McDuck growing up or something)

I think the reason tipping takeaway delivery and waitresses is seen as important in the US is that their minimum wage (state dependent) is usually not nearly enough for the person to earn a working wage. Kinda defeats the point of having a minimum wage IMO.

Actually Waiters sometimes get paid well below minimum wage. Waiters in my town (in texas) get paid around 2 to 3 dollars an hour and are expected to make their income via tips. Also minimum wage for half the country is dependent on federal government's law on minimum wage.

#15 Posted by casper_ (901 posts) -

dude, patrick doesn't have time for your meaningless "facts" he's got opinions to espouse.

#16 Edited by MocBucket62 (1159 posts) -

I'm going to Spain pretty soon and from what I heard, Spaniards don't tip, but I can't say that most of Europe does the same thing.

#17 Posted by MordeaniisChaos (5730 posts) -

@alternate said:

@eidderf said:

@alternate: Yes, basically a tip is usually expected in a more fancy restaurant or something like that in the UK, but that's the only time it's really required or that common from my experience at least. I always find it weird that it seems quite common in America to tip the guy delivering you fast food, I don't think I've ever seen anyone do that (but maybe I just hang around with a bunch of people influenced by Scrooge McDuck growing up or something)

I think the reason tipping takeaway delivery and waitresses is seen as important in the US is that their minimum wage (state dependent) is usually not nearly enough for the person to earn a working wage. Kinda defeats the point of having a minimum wage IMO.

You can live on full time min wage. You just can't do much else but live. If you want to go to school or have a decent place/vehicle, you need better but you can totally pay for a place to live and food on min wage.

But that's certainly the approximate reason for the low end tipping. When tipping at a nice establishment it's based on service quality. If you have shitty service, don't tip. If it's great, drop a hefty bill.

#18 Edited by hughesman (312 posts) -

@alternate said:

@eidderf said:

@alternate: Yes, basically a tip is usually expected in a more fancy restaurant or something like that in the UK, but that's the only time it's really required or that common from my experience at least. I always find it weird that it seems quite common in America to tip the guy delivering you fast food, I don't think I've ever seen anyone do that (but maybe I just hang around with a bunch of people influenced by Scrooge McDuck growing up or something)

I think the reason tipping takeaway delivery and waitresses is seen as important in the US is that their minimum wage (state dependent) is usually not nearly enough for the person to earn a working wage. Kinda defeats the point of having a minimum wage IMO.

Actually Waiters sometimes get paid well below minimum wage. Waiters in my town (in texas) get paid around 2 to 3 dollars an hour and are expected to make their income via tips. Also minimum wage for half the country is dependent on federal government's law on minimum wage.

The fact that they get paid below minimum wage is kinda irrelevant. Point is, they walk home with more money every night then what the restaurant could probably afford to pay them (if they were paid just a straight wage) and the customer gets to reward good or bad service accordingly, and the restaurant gets to keep advertised meal prices down to get people in the door. Win, win and win.

#19 Edited by CornBREDX (4855 posts) -

In America it is expected we tip because (as explained) waiters get paid shit.

I have a problem with tipping myself. It's not my job to pay their waiter to do his job, it should be the establishments, but economics in America are weird. Basically everyone wants to keep prices "down". In turn this means they don't pay their staff very well (in most places). So in low income jobs that expect delivery or waiter type service it is expected you make up for it. Quite stupid.

I personally do not tip unless the wait person goes out of his or her way. I tip exception.

I do always tip delivery- I don't know why. Mainly because I feel bad for some reason. I am lazy so I prefer to have them deliver to my door an already over priced meal (everything that is delivered is way more expensive then even fast food). Sadly the delivery person is not really getting any benefit unless I tip. I don't tip a lot (because I cant) but I tip adequately I feel.

The expectation of tipping, though, has always insulted me.

#20 Edited by Dan_CiTi (3187 posts) -

Tips exists because waiting staff is underpaid, at least in the United States, so I do not know if it that is the case in other countries. Though, I don't recall if we did it when I was in France and Italy.

#21 Edited by troll93 (386 posts) -

I know it's not Europe, but here is Australia, I don't think I have ever seen anybody tip. I have occasionally seen a jar on the counter saying tips, but it is always empty, and I'm surely not putting anything in it.

#22 Posted by FunkasaurasRex (847 posts) -

I think this is just a matter of Patrick painting Europe in broad strokes because Americans I guess.

#23 Edited by Nictel (2385 posts) -

I tip, in Europe, also in Germany. I don't think I am crazy nor have I been looked upon weirdly. Was quite surprised hearing Patrick say that, maybe it is parts of countries and not a whole country where it might be unusual.

#24 Posted by President_Barackbar (3439 posts) -


The fact that they get paid below minimum wage is kinda irrelevant. Point is, they walk home with more money every night then what the restaurant could probably afford to pay them (if they were paid just a straight wage) and the customer gets to reward good or bad service accordingly, and the restaurant gets to keep advertised meal prices down to get people in the door. Win, win and win.

This is bunk. The restaurant ABSOLUTELY could afford to pay people more, they just make more profit if they don't have to and can justify it. Its a win only for the establishment, especially since raising waitstaff wages wouldn't necessarily eliminate tipping. You could still have tips and let the person make a decent wage.

#25 Edited by MariachiMacabre (7056 posts) -

@casper_ said:

dude, patrick doesn't have time for your meaningless "facts" he's got opinions to espouse.

He only mentioned Germany and he was correct. I've heard the same thing from multiple sources regarding Germany. Don't attack Patrick at every goddamn opportunity, please.

#26 Posted by Heltom92 (706 posts) -

@alternate: I live in the UK and tipping is very common for me.

#27 Edited by Max_Cherry (1131 posts) -

I think this is just a matter of Patrick painting Europe in broad strokes because Americans I guess.

I hate how europeans are always making broad strokes about how "americans" paint europe in broad strokes.

#28 Edited by Max_Cherry (1131 posts) -

@kidable said:

In Ireland, I've never paid for food at a resteraunt for myself yet because I'm not a crazy person, but they include tips in food delivery. And general other things. However, I *do* subscribe to the Steve Buscemi philosophy of tipping in this scene

I agree with Harvey Keitel.

#29 Posted by ripelivejam (3585 posts) -

I think this is just a matter of Patrick painting Europe in broad strokes because Americans I guess.

yeah kinda like how we're all fat, violent, have bad senses of humor and are downright terrible to a lot of the british.

#30 Posted by michaeldim (83 posts) -

I think this is just a matter of Patrick painting Europe in broad strokes because Americans I guess.

This may be the most ironic statement in the history of the known world.

#31 Edited by ThePickle (4155 posts) -

@funkasaurasrex said:

I think this is just a matter of Patrick painting Europe in broad strokes because Americans I guess.

yeah kinda like how we're all fat, violent, have bad senses of humor and are downright terrible to a lot of the british.

@funkasaurasrex said:

I think this is just a matter of Patrick painting Europe in broad strokes because Americans I guess.

This may be the most ironic statement in the history of the known world.

these two right here

#32 Edited by Hunter5024 (5552 posts) -

Strange, I'd heard the same thing that Patrick had. My waitress friend says that foreigners almost never tip. Maybe she was just exaggerating.

#33 Edited by Snail (8584 posts) -

As I understand it, in the US the salaries of waiters (and similar jobs) are much more dependent on how much they're tipped. Tips are crucial in some states. You'll get heck nagged by some folks if you don't tip an adequate percentage, because their salaries are based on that. Some receipts even come with pre-calculated tips, saying how much you have to tip if you chose to tip an extra, say, 18%, or 20% if you feel the service deserves that, and even higher.

It's a different culture when it comes to tips. Here we just put anywhere between 20 cents and 2€ when going to a coffee shop, or maybe a lot higher if you feel like it. Or maybe nothing! On a pricy restaurant you might tip 10€, or maybe 50€ if you're feeling extravagantly generous or are a regular or something. There's no math involved or anything. Salaries aren't necessarily explicitly dependent on your tips. So you just throw in some money.

I guess that's what Patrick meant if he did say that we Europeans "don't tip". I doubt that he thinks we literally don't tip at restaurants and coffee shops because that would be kinda dumb, especially considering he spent like a week in Iceland.

#34 Posted by froesti (101 posts) -

Here in Munich it is not really required to tip, especially if you are a student or something, but at most nice restaurants with good service, a tip is basically expexted.
Fast food delivery guys are mostly tipped as well. But maybe he tipped a little bit much or just at some crazy restaurant, I dunno, I've heard some weird stories from foreigners traveling here. People are crazay.

#35 Edited by Raven10 (1736 posts) -

I have never been to Europe but most of my family has either lived there or spent significant time there and there are quite a few areas where tipping is uncommon, or at least not expected. In the US you are expected to tip for service, good or bad. That includes waiting staff, delivery staff, taxi drivers, any sort of hotel worker who carries your bags or brings anything to your room, and a bunch of other people. In fact, if a business doesn't want you to tip they are expected to put up a sign saying so. Obviously Europe isn't one big homogenous place but even in places where tipping is expected there I do not believe you are expected to tip as many different types of people or tip as highly (usually well off people tip about 20% for good service, 15% for average service, and 10% for bad service). Personally I've given very high tips for people who go out of their way to improve my experience, and I've only once not given any tip and that was a very special case.

#36 Posted by Raven10 (1736 posts) -

I also wanted to add that many Europeans know that Americans expect them not to tip and so they don't even if they usually do at home. It kind of reinforces the stereotype.

#37 Posted by casper_ (901 posts) -

@mariachimacabre: i was just trying make a little joke , not to be rude or anything, although i can see how it could come off that way now so my bad. that said its definitely a weird enviroment where even the mention of patrick in a way that isn't entirely positive is equated to a hateful attack. hope this issue blows over soon, which i'm pretty sure it will.

#38 Posted by supamon (1333 posts) -

People don't tip here in Singapore either. That's cause the basic salary of waiters/waitresses aren't that low (but still pretty menial) and there's a service tax already included in the bill mandated by the government.

#39 Edited by DarthOrange (3852 posts) -

@kidable said:

In Ireland, I've never paid for food at a resteraunt for myself yet because I'm not a crazy person, but they include tips in food delivery. And general other things. However, I *do* subscribe to the Steve Buscemi philosophy of tipping in this scene

I agree with Harvey Keitel.

Hey hey hey that's Mr. Pussy Mr. Pink to you!

#40 Edited by Fearbeard (824 posts) -

I seriously hope that tipping isn't common in Iceland because as a worker in the US who lives off of tips while going to school, I nearly did a spit take when he was talking about the whole restaurant situation and the near delight in his voice when he said "no, you don't tip." I'm glad he elaborated with the Germany story, but it did seem odd that he was grouping all of Europe together when it's such an incredibly diverse place.

#41 Posted by Ares42 (2589 posts) -

Here in Norway tipping is not a big thing, but then again we don't have a very strong restaurant culture either. Think it counts for most of Scandinavia.

As has been mentioned in the thread though, considering how many half-truths (if even that) Patrick told you should take his statement with a grain of salt. Listening to his stories made it pretty clear why people have so many stupid preconceptions about foreign countires.

Online
#42 Edited by FunkasaurasRex (847 posts) -

@michaeldim said:

@funkasaurasrex said:

I think this is just a matter of Patrick painting Europe in broad strokes because Americans I guess.

This may be the most ironic statement in the history of the known world.

I really hope not; I didn't even try that hard.

#43 Edited by Roboculus92 (487 posts) -

A bit of a tangent but I just want to say that the way that tipping is handled here in America is dumb. Waiters (or really tip-based jobs in general) shouldn't be dependent on tips to make minimum wage, they should just get paid minimum wage to begin with. The way it is now, tipping might as well be mandatory since the waiters are dependent on it since they don't get paid enough. Also, most people end up tipping anyway, regardless of the service, so I feel it would be better to just add a mandatory service fee to the bill (kinda like how it's done in some European countries). As long as the employees are getting paid at least minimum wage (which still isn't great but it is better than what they got now as far as I'm concerned), I think this would be totally fine (and also make the costs more transparent for customers). I wouldn't call it "mandatory tipping" because that sounds like a contradiction to me. Tipping should be an optional thing done for exceptional service. I've heard the argument made that this could result in workers just trying to get away with minimum effort since they'll lack the motivation to work now but the way I see it, if you slack off too much in other jobs then people will complain and you'll probably get fired so why shouldn't it be the case here?

#44 Edited by McGhee (6094 posts) -

I'm going to Spain pretty soon and from what I heard, Spaniards don't tip, but I can't say that most of Europe does the same thing.

That was my experience when I was there, although I still tipped sometimes anyway.

#45 Edited by hawkinsn (25 posts) -

@roboculus92 said:

A bit of a tangent but I just want to say that the way that tipping is handled here in America is dumb. Waiters (or really tip-based jobs in general) shouldn't be dependent on tips to make minimum wage, they should just get paid minimum wage to begin with. The way it is now, tipping might as well be mandatory since the waiters are dependent on it since they don't get paid enough. Also, most people end up tipping anyway, regardless of the service, so I feel it would be better to just add a mandatory service fee to the bill (kinda like how it's done in some European countries). As long as the employees are getting paid at least minimum wage (which still isn't great but it is better than what they got now as far as I'm concerned), I think this would be totally fine (and also make the costs more transparent for customers). I wouldn't call it "mandatory tipping" because that sounds like a contradiction to me. Tipping should be an optional thing done for exceptional service. I've heard the argument made that this could result in workers just trying to get away with minimum effort since they'll lack the motivation to work now but the way I see it, if you slack off too much in other jobs then people will complain and you'll probably get fired so why shouldn't it be the case here?

In the US, people who are employed by someone else have to make minimum wage. This includes people who make tips. If someone who is paid on tips makes less than a total of $7.25 an hour from hourly wage plus tips, the restaurant, pizza joint, etc. must compensate the difference.

However, servers, for example, who fail to claim enough tips to total the minimum wage may see their hours cut at work, because the business could choose to extend company time to those who cost the business the least amount to employ.

#46 Posted by Icemael (6312 posts) -

@somejerk said:

Always been tipping in Sweden. In good team-buildy comfortable places it ends up in one big jar (virtual or not) that the waiting staff split.

I live in Sweden and I have never tipped or seen anyone else tip.

#47 Posted by Tylea002 (2295 posts) -

FUCK TIPPING.

That is all.

#48 Posted by Roland_D11 (188 posts) -

I am german and tipping is a very commonplace thing. I always tip about 10% at restaurants or when I get delivered food. I never experienced anyone being offended by getting offered a tip here. Everyone I know tips at a restaurant. Is it required? No. But is it frowned upon or do people get insulted? No.

#49 Edited by altairre (1139 posts) -

German dude here too. You don't tip in Germany but only if the service was shitty or you're an asshole. The waiter won't say anything if you don't but he'll definetely notice it.

#50 Posted by jgf (383 posts) -

I'm also German and I second that. We definitely tip. Usually around 10%, so somewhat less then in the US. But our service staff gets paid better, so they do not rely on tips make a living. We do not tip in self service restaurants though.