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Posted by ShawnS
@Bocam said:
" Most of those games are not what Japanese people consider scary. "
and @SeriouslyNow . Good points, if these were actually made to frighten the Japanese it would be much more Siren-y. Devs are seeing grotesque, dark and bloody Western hits like Gears and trying their hand to appeal to "us". Except for Yakuza, that seems like another crazy Japanese game for the Japanese that just so happens to have zombies.
Edited by SeriouslyNow
@Bocam said:

" Most of those games are not what Japanese people consider scary. "

This.
 
Also, Japan is a culture which picks up on current world media trends and then multiplies them with almost infinite variation.  In this case, it's Zombie Horror.
Posted by Bocam

Most of those games are not what Japanese people consider scary.

Posted by abdo

Good observation. Yeah it does seem that this is what they're going for. Maybe because now that they can't develop games for Japan only, they need to think of the whole world as a potential audience. I don't mind if this is the new thing, but I just hope that they don't all become too similar to each other. We still need originality and innovation.

Posted by ShawnS

 


 Here’s a spooky coincidence that involves some equally spooky games. Watching the news pour in during the recently concluded Tokyo Game Show I couldn’t help but notice how many new titles revolved around dark, ghostly or otherworldly themes. I dug up a list of every game that had a presence at the show and although these “scary games” only represent a very tiny minority I was still surprised by how many made the headlines.

Minority or not, these were some of the biggest reveals from the show, produced and developed by some of the biggest names in Japan. Konami, Shinji Mikami, Capcom, Sega, Suda51, Namco Bandai, even PaRappa creator Masaya Matsuura. And that’s without calling out Western-devved sequels to Japanese games like DMCCastlevania and Splatterhouse. I’ll go ahead ask ‘what’s up with that?‘ but warn that it’s only a rhetorical question. I don’t have the connections or the insight to do anything but throw out hypotheticals.

Is this how the Japanese try to appeal to Western audiences after the middling attempts so far? Is this one of those Volcano/Dante’s Peak moments where everyone hit upon the same inspiration at the same time? Can you go even deeper and attribute it to a shift in the perceptions of Japanese creators and producers? I wish I knew but all I can do is point it out and wait to see how things develop. If we wind up calling ‘scary games‘ the new ‘cover-based shooter‘ in three years you’ll know I was onto something today.