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Posted by prestonhedges

@HandsomeDead said:

@gladspooky said:

@superpow said:

There are more types of games than AAA titles and shooters you know... Of course those games don't have anything special. But your arguments just show me you don't know much about games other than the major releases.

His main arguments seem to be "Shooters in which you shoot people are boring" and "Games have never made me cry, so this is a worthless hobby."

I guess every time he does a walk-the-dog with a yo-yo he bursts into tears.

Nope. Try again.

Nah, I pretty much nailed it. Maybe next time try to do it in less than eighty paragraphs.

Posted by Centimani

I traded my copy of MW2 for Harvest Moon: Hero of Leaf Valley and gave it to my girlfriend at the time as an anniversary present. I only had to pay a 20 cent difference. Best thing I got out of that game.

Posted by SeriouslyNow

@gladspooky said:

@HandsomeDead said:

@gladspooky said:

@superpow said:

There are more types of games than AAA titles and shooters you know... Of course those games don't have anything special. But your arguments just show me you don't know much about games other than the major releases.

His main arguments seem to be "Shooters in which you shoot people are boring" and "Games have never made me cry, so this is a worthless hobby."

I guess every time he does a walk-the-dog with a yo-yo he bursts into tears.

Nope. Try again.

Nah, I pretty much nailed it. Maybe next time try to do it in less than eighty paragraphs.

Bro, you totally nailed it, especially the part where you called a woman a dude. Oh and broski, that walk the the dog with a yo-yo comment was brodaciously funny. You should write Momma's House scripts breh.

Posted by mewarmo990

I agree with nearly all of your points, but you didn't really seem to consider that not everyone has the same preferences or appreciates a good narrative in the same way that you do. 
 
Some people are very easily entertained by violence. Some people play games just to take a load off, and Gears of War happens to be adequate stress relief. And a lot of people are into shooters for that competitive feeling, rather than the fact that you are playing a "murder simulator" or whatever.
 
I enjoyed all of those games you mentioned, and most of the movies/books you said as well. For me, narrative and aesthetic are almost as important in a video game as the gameplay itself, yet I liked Borderlands just because of the crazy gun loot system. I like shooting bad guys, but a game where I don't get to shoot anything can be just as good or even better than Mass Effect. I actually liked Resident Evil 5 because I like cooperative games of almost any kind, and because I didn't like the rest of the series very much - you could say Capcom's lowest common denominator strategy targeted people like me. 
 
The same could be said for casual games that don't involve much violence of any kind. There isn't much substance to the, but they have that addictive entertainment quality to them and that's all you really need to sell a video game. Also, you may have grown out of mindless action but people are growing into the demographic all the time.
 
So is it really so hard to understand that a great majority of the current video game market has different tastes and values from you? I don' think so.

Edited by Kazona

I would love to say that I disagree with you, but I can't. The only thing that draws me to games these days are the stories, provided they're above mediocre. I didn't finish Mass Effect 2 or Red Dead Redemption because of their original gameplay mechanics, but because their stories intrigued me. Like a soap opera addict, I wanted to see what would become of John Marston at the end of his journey, and I wanted to find out just how suicidal that mission in ME2 was, and what things were in store for ME3.

But as far as gameplay goes, neither offered something that I hadn't seen before. While I don't think originality is dead, I do think it's increasingly more difficult for developers to be original. If not because of the sheer number of games being published, then because of the risks that come with trying something different.

Just imagine spending twenty million dollars on a new, innovative game, and having it completely tank because people fear change (hate to say it, but it's true). Such a thing can be the undoing of a developer. Just look at the amount of development studios that have been shuttered this year alone, and I can kind of understand why developers and publishers are so afraid of doing something that breaks the mold.

And to be fair, I too am growing weary of the rinse-and-repeat attitude that's permeating the industry now. And I think the only way for things to change is if the majority of the game playing audience begins having the same feeling of reluctance.