#1 Posted by claiver (13 posts) -

Greetings!

I'm developing a website and as some of you that do the same may know: finding a reliable and good functioning web-text editor is a pain. Now I've been lurking on Giant Bomb for quite a while, registered an account a few weeks ago, and with that I discovered the text editor that's used here named "Parchment". Now I wonder, is this editor customly made for and by Giant Bomb? Is it written from scratch or based on another editor? I'd really like to know, for I love the way it functions.

Thanks for any replies,

- Claiver

#2 Posted by Branthog (7342 posts) -

I can't offer much comment on modern options for a WYSIWYG web-based embedded editor. However, in my experience developing a massive site with more than 100k users (in which the least complicated part was writing a forum-engine from scratch) for over a decade, they are always more trouble than they are worth. Text is a fine method of communication and, for the most part, very simple text enhancements are more than enough. If you design your software so that it accepts and properly displays <i>, <b>, <u>, <hr>, and <pre> (or some custom variant like it), along with <ul><li> for lists, then you should have all you need to allow users to make appealing presentations for long amounts of content.

The biggest waste of my time was probably fucking around with all the shitty WYSIWYG forum editors that just wound up fucking up spacing and paragraphs and everything. A few simple pieces of interpreted markup was ultimately the way to go -- and then you don't have to worry about shit breaking when whoever makes the WYSIWYG updates it. :)

Obviously, choose whatever you prefer, but these are my experienced thoughts on it. Even the GB iteration of it has its problems. Maybe there's something out there I'm unaware of that has completely addressed the shittiness of this over-complex "solution" to a usually-not-needing-a-solution-problem. :)

#3 Posted by claiver (13 posts) -

@Branthog said:

I can't offer much comment on modern options for a WYSIWYG web-based embedded editor. However, in my experience developing a massive site with more than 100k users (in which the least complicated part was writing a forum-engine from scratch) for over a decade, they are always more trouble than they are worth. Text is a fine method of communication and, for the most part, very simple text enhancements are more than enough. If you design your software so that it accepts and properly displays <i>, <b>, <u>, <hr>, and <pre> (or some custom variant like it), along with <ul><li> for lists, then you should have all you need to allow users to make appealing presentations for long amounts of content.

The biggest waste of my time was probably fucking around with all the shitty WYSIWYG forum editors that just wound up fucking up spacing and paragraphs and everything. A few simple pieces of interpreted markup was ultimately the way to go -- and then you don't have to worry about shit breaking when whoever makes the WYSIWYG updates it. :)

Obviously, choose whatever you prefer, but these are my experienced thoughts on it. Even the GB iteration of it has its problems. Maybe there's something out there I'm unaware of that has completely addressed the shittiness of this over-complex "solution" to a usually-not-needing-a-solution-problem. :)

Thanks for your reply Branthog, I appreciate :-). I just got a reply from stating it was written entirely in-house by the team, so my question is more or less solved.

In my current application I'm using TinyMCE which works OK-ish, but still lacks a little smoothness to it.

#4 Posted by GrantHeaslip (1518 posts) -

@Branthog said:

I can't offer much comment on modern options for a WYSIWYG web-based embedded editor. However, in my experience developing a massive site with more than 100k users (in which the least complicated part was writing a forum-engine from scratch) for over a decade, they are always more trouble than they are worth. Text is a fine method of communication and, for the most part, very simple text enhancements are more than enough. If you design your software so that it accepts and properly displays <i>, <b>, <u>, <hr>, and <pre> (or some custom variant like it), along with <ul><li> for lists, then you should have all you need to allow users to make appealing presentations for long amounts of content.

It may depend on your audience, but if you're looking at allowing straight-up HTML, maybe consider Markdown instead. It also takes inline and block-level HTML, but it automatically encloses paragraphs in <p> tags, lets you *emphasize* and **strong** text, allows for creating blockquotes with ">", and has an easier [link format](http://example.com/). If you've heard of Textile, it's like that but (in my opinion) better.