#1 Edited by Mentalnova (139 posts) -

Which staff didn't go/finish?

#2 Posted by RaikohBlade (593 posts) -

I thought you were talking about the community, haha. I'm curious too, maybe we'll get some answers.

#3 Posted by jmrwacko (2444 posts) -

Jeff went to Cool Kid University, where he graduated with a BA (bachelor of awesome).

#4 Posted by Mentalnova (139 posts) -

@RaikohBlade said:

I thought you were talking about the community, haha. I'm curious too, maybe we'll get some answers.

I realized so I fixed it.

#5 Posted by Slaker117 (4835 posts) -

I want to say Brad and Vinny went to college, but I don't know. Pretty sure Jeff and Ryan did not.

#6 Posted by Seedofpower (3909 posts) -

@Slaker117 said:

I want to say Brad and Vinny went to college, but I don't know. Pretty sure Jeff and Ryan did not.

I think you might be correct.

#7 Edited by Animasta (14460 posts) -

Pretty sure Jeff, Vinny and Brad did, I dunno about ryan

I'm a little interested about where they went though

Online
#8 Edited by Dany (7887 posts) -

No on Jeff and Ryan (old schoolers, where writing about video games didn't require a degree) and Yes for Vinny and Brad

I think

#9 Edited by FengShuiGod (1470 posts) -

Brad went to college for programming(?) then switched over to English. Vinny went somewhere in New York. I don't think Jeff went. I don't know how I know this. I could also be wrong.

There were profiles that they did when they were at GS in which they talked about themselves a little. I remember Alex's and Brad's in which Brad talked about college. Alex was living at home at the time and couldn't go out the front door because a bird lived in it.

#10 Edited by Enigma777 (6047 posts) -

Dunno about the GB crew, but I know for a fact that Norm has a degree in Computer Science and Will was supposed to be a doctor before he switched.

#11 Posted by Yanngc33 (4496 posts) -

@FengShuiGod said:

Brad went to college for programming then switched over to English. Vinny went somewhere in New York. I don't think Jeff went. I don't know how I know this. I could also be wrong.

I think Jeff is an english major

#12 Posted by VilhelmNielsen (1733 posts) -

Jeff dropped out of high school and went straight to writing. I'm pretty sure about that. He wrote from a start-up magazine that crashed before the first issue hit the streets. Eventually ended up on videogames.com, which became gamespot.com.

#13 Posted by FengShuiGod (1470 posts) -

Also Rorie went for Physics I think. He mentions it in the latest Sidegrades. I remember him and Will reminiscing about Chemistry and how little they remembered at some point.

#14 Posted by Milkman (16228 posts) -

You can tell by the completely different answers in this thread that no one knows what the fuck they're talking about.

#15 Edited by ThePickle (4149 posts) -

Jeff definitely didn't, Brad definitely did. Will is a Chemistry major. Vinny went to the school of hard knocks.

Edit: Patrick also went to college. Probably a journalism major.

#16 Posted by zombie2011 (4941 posts) -

I think i remember Jeff saying he dropped out of high-school, he was answering someone's question about if they should go to college during a bombcast.

#17 Posted by Slaker117 (4835 posts) -
@VilhelmNielsen said:

Jeff dropped out of high school and went straight to writing. I'm pretty sure about that. He wrote from a start-up magazine that crashed before the first issue hit the streets. Eventually ended up on videogames.com, which became gamespot.com.

Yeah, now I remember that too. Jeff dropped out of high school. I am sure of this.
#18 Posted by Rhaknar (5940 posts) -

jeff has said on multiple ocasions he dropped out of high school and went straight into the industry, how the hell would he have gone to college :)

Im sure Brad and Vinny have mentioned they were in college in podcasts, no idea about Ryan. And i think Patrick has a degree

#19 Posted by ajamafalous (11592 posts) -
@VilhelmNielsen said:

Jeff dropped out of high school and went straight to writing. I'm pretty sure about that. He wrote from a start-up magazine that crashed before the first issue hit the streets. Eventually ended up on videogames.com, which became gamespot.com.

Yeah, I'm almost positive that Jeff has said this much. I think in a vyou video or some other tangential media. 
 
Brad went to college for CS then switched to English. He worked as an intern at Gamespot then became full staff. He says that much in a video on Gamespot that was profiling him as an editor. 
 
I think Dave went to college for a year or two but then dropped out. Believe I read that in either an article by him or he might've said something alluding to that in the first gin video where they make the wager, something about "I last had gin when I was in college, which wasn't very long" or something. 
 
No idea about Vinny or Ryan. If I had to guess, yes on Vinny, no on Ryan. Patrick's so young that I'd have to imagine he couldn't break into the industry without a degree, though I could be completely wrong.
#20 Edited by OroJackson (680 posts) -

Jeff didn't drop out of High School, he went into some sort of research program that allowed him to not go to school but still graduate and get a degree,

and he went to Casa Grande High School in Petaluma

#21 Posted by CookieMonster (2408 posts) -

I heard they all took a degree in Golf Course Management with Food Technology at Croyden University.

#22 Posted by the_OFFICIAL_jAPanese_teaBAG (4307 posts) -

Oh I thought you were asking about the community...  And didnt Jeff get a degree or something? 

#23 Posted by Little_Socrates (5649 posts) -

@VilhelmNielsen said:

Jeff dropped out of high school and went straight to writing. I'm pretty sure about that. He wrote from a start-up magazine that crashed before the first issue hit the streets. Eventually ended up on videogames.com, which became gamespot.com.

This is definitely the story I've heard. No idea on the other guys, been curious for a while myself.

#24 Posted by Mikemcn (6875 posts) -

@Little_Socrates said:

@VilhelmNielsen said:

Jeff dropped out of high school and went straight to writing. I'm pretty sure about that. He wrote from a start-up magazine that crashed before the first issue hit the streets. Eventually ended up on videogames.com, which became gamespot.com.

This is definitely the story I've heard. No idea on the other guys, been curious for a while myself.

He didn't drop out, or so I thought. he at least finished High School.

#25 Posted by FengShuiGod (1470 posts) -

Found it!

#26 Posted by _Nuno_ (183 posts) -

I know that Jeff dropped out of high-school but got his high-school degree some other way. Don't know about college.

#27 Edited by Gerhabio (1969 posts) -

@Laketown said:

Pretty sure Jeff, Vinny and Brad did, I dunno about ryan

I'm a little interested about where they went though

Jeff is a high school drop-out, he talked about it in a bombcast once.

#28 Posted by LKPOWER (153 posts) -

@VilhelmNielsen: No! I distinctly remember a gamespot caller telling Jeff and Vinny that he dropped out of high school to persue games journalism and then asking them where to start, and Jeff saying something like: go back to school, I didn't get my diploma the traditional way but at least I finished school. and in this clips he mentions transferring to an "alternative education center"

#29 Posted by yoshimitz707 (2446 posts) -

Jeff didn't drop out of high school! He dropped out of college!

#30 Posted by Slaker117 (4835 posts) -

It's kind of creepy how much random stuff we know about the staff, but I guess that's what happens when you listen to people talk about random stuff for two hours a week over multiple years.

#31 Edited by FengShuiGod (1470 posts) -

@Slaker117 said:

It's kind of creepy how much random stuff we know about the staff, but I guess that's what happens when you listen to people talk about random stuff for two hours a week over multiple years.

Yeah, I was just thinking the same thing. I felt weird when I realized I know what I do about these people. I've been listening to them since I was, I dunno, 13 years old. I'm almost 20 now. That's a lot of time spent listening to/reading these guys.

#32 Posted by Mr_Skeleton (5117 posts) -

I'm pretty sure Patrick did, don't know about the others.

#33 Posted by Animasta (14460 posts) -

@FengShuiGod: oh my god that video makes brad look cute as hell

Online
#34 Posted by Vinny_Says (5630 posts) -

Jeff dropped out of High school but got his GED anyway.

Brad went to college, video above...

Vinny also went to college, mentioned on the podcast, maybe that's where he got video skills

Ryan worked at a Toys-R-Us for a bit but that's all I know. Maybe he finished high school

#35 Posted by Branthog (7332 posts) -

I never know what to tell people, when they ask if they should go to college. On one hand, it feels like you almost have to if you want to get into any career these days. Not because the knowledge itself is so valuable, but because the piece of paper is. On the other hand, I'm pretty sure people were saying that back in the nineties, when I dropped out of the ninth grade and almost immediately moved to the Bay Area and signed a contract with my first employer that fired off my entire career. So if I could do it, I don't see why anyone else could not (and I've certainly not found that a degree or formal education has been a useful indicator of someone's knowledge or talent). On the other hand, I feel almost negligent by saying that, because maybe luck played a big part in my career. Maybe it was just making that right impression on that right contact at that right time that set everything into motion and if it weren't for that one fortuitous situation, all the self-learning and drive from my teenage years that I put into it would have been for nothing?

I would rather be making a six figure salary by the time my peers were close to graduating college rather than graduating college with six-figure debt.

I guess it comes down to your passion and the field. Obviously doctors and lawyers are a no-brainer. You need the education, experience, and paper. If you just woke up one day and picked a career not for passion, but because you saw a list of highest paying jobs somewhere and the job was on it, you might need a formal education. If you are the type of person who requires guidance and a set path and for people to tell them what to learn and how to learn it (nothing against that - some people really need and thrive from the structure), then you definitely need it.

But for most everything else? I think that if you have enough passion, determination, ambition, and are an autodidact, then you can get just as far without formal education through non-traditional means.

#36 Posted by Barrock (3525 posts) -

@Branthog said:

I never know what to tell people, when they ask if they should go to college. On one hand, it feels like you almost have to if you want to get into any career these days. Not because the knowledge itself is so valuable, but because the piece of paper is. On the other hand, I'm pretty sure people were saying that back in the nineties, when I dropped out of the ninth grade and almost immediately moved to the Bay Area and signed a contract with my first employer that fired off my entire career. So if I could do it, I don't see why anyone else could not (and I've certainly not found that a degree or formal education has been a useful indicator of someone's knowledge or talent). On the other hand, I feel almost negligent by saying that, because maybe luck played a big part in my career. Maybe it was just making that right impression on that right contact at that right time that set everything into motion and if it weren't for that one fortuitous situation, all the self-learning and drive from my teenage years that I put into it would have been for nothing?

I would rather be making a six figure salary by the time my peers were close to graduating college rather than graduating college with six-figure debt.

I guess it comes down to your passion and the field. Obviously doctors and lawyers are a no-brainer. You need the education, experience, and paper. If you just woke up one day and picked a career not for passion, but because you saw a list of highest paying jobs somewhere and the job was on it, you might need a formal education. If you are the type of person who requires guidance and a set path and for people to tell them what to learn and how to learn it (nothing against that - some people really need and thrive from the structure), then you definitely need it.

But for most everything else? I think that if you have enough passion, determination, ambition, and are an autodidact, then you can get just as far without formal education through non-traditional means.

What do you do?

#37 Edited by kmdrkul (3476 posts) -

Patrick went to college.

Apparently Brad did, too.

So did Vinny.

Could not find Jeff or Ryan. Actually I found Jeff's but it wasn't filled out. Not entirely sure if these Linkedin profiles are legit but am pretty sure. Brad's is clearly out of date but why on earth would somebody create a Linkedin profile for one of the GB crew and fake their university?

#38 Posted by FengShuiGod (1470 posts) -

Hell, a lot of (?most) people who go to college don't even end up working in a job that is relevant to their field of study. Education is not a mode of living, it is a byproduct of life. You should be learning and productive wherever you are, college is simply a different avenue that works for some. The only way college can be negative is if you borrow too much to attend and/or waste your time and do nothing to take advantages of the resources offered. College or no, if you aren't learning a lot from the ages of 18-22 something is wrong. Hell, you should be learning from the ages of 0-100. After you get to be 100 you can do whatever you want.

#39 Posted by Branthog (7332 posts) -
@Barrock said:

@Branthog said:

I never know what to tell people, when they ask if they should go to college. On one hand, it feels like you almost have to if you want to get into any career these days. Not because the knowledge itself is so valuable, but because the piece of paper is. On the other hand, I'm pretty sure people were saying that back in the nineties, when I dropped out of the ninth grade and almost immediately moved to the Bay Area and signed a contract with my first employer that fired off my entire career. So if I could do it, I don't see why anyone else could not (and I've certainly not found that a degree or formal education has been a useful indicator of someone's knowledge or talent). On the other hand, I feel almost negligent by saying that, because maybe luck played a big part in my career. Maybe it was just making that right impression on that right contact at that right time that set everything into motion and if it weren't for that one fortuitous situation, all the self-learning and drive from my teenage years that I put into it would have been for nothing?

I would rather be making a six figure salary by the time my peers were close to graduating college rather than graduating college with six-figure debt.

I guess it comes down to your passion and the field. Obviously doctors and lawyers are a no-brainer. You need the education, experience, and paper. If you just woke up one day and picked a career not for passion, but because you saw a list of highest paying jobs somewhere and the job was on it, you might need a formal education. If you are the type of person who requires guidance and a set path and for people to tell them what to learn and how to learn it (nothing against that - some people really need and thrive from the structure), then you definitely need it.

But for most everything else? I think that if you have enough passion, determination, ambition, and are an autodidact, then you can get just as far without formal education through non-traditional means.

What do you do?

Nothing special. I started as a software engineer at Netscape just before the AOL|Sun Microsystems alliance that grew out of the purchase of Netscape and lasted several years. I worked primarily with the browser. (The first version that I was involved with was Netscape Navigator 3.04). When Sun and AOL came along, some employees wound up with AOL and others (including myself) with Sun, where my work transitioned to enterprise stuff that you probably use every day, even if you aren't aware of it.
 

Note that I'm not a developer, however. I'm no coding genius or product manager or anything. I actually work with the sustaining groups, which means when something blows up, we're responsible for debugging and analyzing the defect, writing a hotfix patch (often times these are one-offs specific to a customer's deployment) and merging into the rest of the codebase when appropriate. Rinse and repeat. It's one of those careers where you are constantly fighting one fire after another, but it's always different, always challenging, and you get to deal with some really cool people at companies and governments all over the world -- often in their most dire and trying moments. 

 
Don't get me wrong - I would love to be some uber-genius like Jamie Zawinski and if I had grown up in an environment with more access to tech and technical people or gone to college, maybe I'd be more like one of those guys. However, I really enjoy what I do and not only am I well compensated for it, but I get to work with incredibly smart people (I learned early on that the best environment to learn in is always the one where you feel like you are the dumbest person in the group). Short of getting to be a rock start or a porn star, I can't think of anything I'd rather be doing for a living. 

 
I feel that for careers such as this, a formal education will open more doors for you. However, you only need to open one door. Exploit the hell out of that opportunity and then your formal education will be almost irrelevant afterward. It will be your experience and reputation that matters (I don't include any education on my resume and nobody has ever asked me about it). If a lazy, dumb, kind of asshole-ish jerk like myself can force just one door open, then I think anyone could do the same. 
  
  
Then again, money aside, I have nothing against college. Okay, maybe just a tiny tinge of "fuck you, college-boy" attitude hidden away somewhere -- but just a little spec. If it's right for someone and the money or scholarship is there, then by all means. But if you can't afford it or can't see yourself going through another four years or you dropped out of high school (some of the smartest people I've ever known dropped out) or you made some big mistakes that you think have just ruined your entire life before you even got it started . . . don't buy into that bullshit.  

 
Love something tenaciously and everything will fall into place.
 
 
 
By the way:  If one forgoes the formal rout - and especially if they drop out - they may find themselves sharing the sentiment of George Carlin, who also dropped out of the ninth grade: "When you quit school in ninth grade and you're smart, you spend your life in some small or large way proving yourself."
 
It's true, but I think it's a benefit. When you think you're lucky and not talented; when you think you're not worthy and the world is going to discover it, that fuels a strong work-ethic that keeps you ahead of the curve. I can't list everyone that I've heard say something similar, but I've heard many of the most successful people that I admire and respect make statements of the same nature.
 
Anyway, hope this was of use to someone out there. I know it's kind of off topic. I just like to take any chance I can to stress to other people who might find themselves in similar situations or faced with similar considerations that they can accomplish whatever it is they really want to. I once skipped over 100 days in a school year. I once had a 0.13 GPA in middle school. I was constantly facing suspensions and detentions from fighting. I wasn't unfamiliar with the backseat of a squad car by the start of highschool. I was the black sheep of the family. And less than two years later, I was well into the beginning of my career. Chances are few others have fucked things up much worse than that . . . so there's potential for everyone to excel.
 
But . . . I'm actually on the clock right now, so I'm going to shut the hell up and review some more bug reports. Ooooh, exciting! :P
#40 Edited by blackbird415 (777 posts) -

fuck it was said in a podcast with ed boon. He dropped out of college to go see the new mortal kombat at ces when there wasnt an E3. That and he was playing it so much in the arcade.

#41 Posted by Grilledcheez (3919 posts) -

Jeff went to Yale, Harvard, and Princeton in the same year...none of them were up to his standards, the rest is history.

#42 Posted by iam3green (14388 posts) -

people don't know what they are talking about. there are like over 9000 different answeres. see what i did there...
 
i went to college, community college. it was alright.

#43 Posted by Chirag4 (585 posts) -

@Branthog said:

@Barrock said:

@Branthog said:

I never know what to tell people, when they ask if they should go to college. On one hand, it feels like you almost have to if you want to get into any career these days. Not because the knowledge itself is so valuable, but because the piece of paper is. On the other hand, I'm pretty sure people were saying that back in the nineties, when I dropped out of the ninth grade and almost immediately moved to the Bay Area and signed a contract with my first employer that fired off my entire career. So if I could do it, I don't see why anyone else could not (and I've certainly not found that a degree or formal education has been a useful indicator of someone's knowledge or talent). On the other hand, I feel almost negligent by saying that, because maybe luck played a big part in my career. Maybe it was just making that right impression on that right contact at that right time that set everything into motion and if it weren't for that one fortuitous situation, all the self-learning and drive from my teenage years that I put into it would have been for nothing?

I would rather be making a six figure salary by the time my peers were close to graduating college rather than graduating college with six-figure debt.

I guess it comes down to your passion and the field. Obviously doctors and lawyers are a no-brainer. You need the education, experience, and paper. If you just woke up one day and picked a career not for passion, but because you saw a list of highest paying jobs somewhere and the job was on it, you might need a formal education. If you are the type of person who requires guidance and a set path and for people to tell them what to learn and how to learn it (nothing against that - some people really need and thrive from the structure), then you definitely need it.

But for most everything else? I think that if you have enough passion, determination, ambition, and are an autodidact, then you can get just as far without formal education through non-traditional means.

What do you do?

Nothing special. I started as a software engineer at Netscape just before the AOL|Sun Microsystems alliance that grew out of the purchase of Netscape and lasted several years. I worked primarily with the browser. (The first version that I was involved with was Netscape Navigator 3.04). When Sun and AOL came along, some employees wound up with AOL and others (including myself) with Sun, where my work transitioned to enterprise stuff that you probably use every day, even if you aren't aware of it.


Note that I'm not a developer, however. I'm no coding genius or product manager or anything. I actually work with the sustaining groups, which means when something blows up, we're responsible for debugging and analyzing the defect, writing a hotfix patch (often times these are one-offs specific to a customer's deployment) and merging into the rest of the codebase when appropriate. Rinse and repeat. It's one of those careers where you are constantly fighting one fire after another, but it's always different, always challenging, and you get to deal with some really cool people at companies and governments all over the world -- often in their most dire and trying moments.


Don't get me wrong - I would love to be some uber-genius like Jamie Zawinski and if I had grown up in an environment with more access to tech and technical people or gone to college, maybe I'd be more like one of those guys. However, I really enjoy what I do and not only am I well compensated for it, but I get to work with incredibly smart people (I learned early on that the best environment to learn in is always the one where you feel like you are the dumbest person in the group). Short of getting to be a rock start or a porn star, I can't think of anything I'd rather be doing for a living.


I feel that for careers such as this, a formal education will open more doors for you. However, you only need to open one door. Exploit the hell out of that opportunity and then your formal education will be almost irrelevant afterward. It will be your experience and reputation that matters (I don't include any education on my resume and nobody has ever asked me about it). If a lazy, dumb, kind of asshole-ish jerk like myself can force just one door open, then I think anyone could do the same.


Then again, money aside, I have nothing against college. Okay, maybe just a tiny tinge of "fuck you, college-boy" attitude hidden away somewhere -- but just a little spec. If it's right for someone and the money or scholarship is there, then by all means. But if you can't afford it or can't see yourself going through another four years or you dropped out of high school (some of the smartest people I've ever known dropped out) or you made some big mistakes that you think have just ruined your entire life before you even got it started . . . don't buy into that bullshit.


Love something tenaciously and everything will fall into place.



By the way: If one forgoes the formal rout - and especially if they drop out - they may find themselves sharing the sentiment of George Carlin, who also dropped out of the ninth grade: "When you quit school in ninth grade and you're smart, you spend your life in some small or large way proving yourself." It's true, but I think it's a benefit. When you think you're lucky and not talented; when you think you're not worthy and the world is going to discover it, that fuels a strong work-ethic that keeps you ahead of the curve. I can't list everyone that I've heard say something similar, but I've heard many of the most successful people that I admire and respect make statements of the same nature. Anyway, hope this was of use to someone out there. I know it's kind of off topic. I just like to take any chance I can to stress to other people who might find themselves in similar situations or faced with similar considerations that they can accomplish whatever it is they really want to. I once skipped over 100 days in a school year. I once had a 0.13 GPA in middle school. I was constantly facing suspensions and detentions from fighting. I wasn't unfamiliar with the backseat of a squad car by the start of highschool. I was the black sheep of the family. And less than two years later, I was well into the beginning of my career. Chances are few others have fucked things up much worse than that . . . so there's potential for everyone to excel. But . . . I'm actually on the clock right now, so I'm going to shut the hell up and review some more bug reports. Ooooh, exciting! :P

I think somewhere in that masturbating post, he said he was a programmer.

#44 Posted by Branthog (7332 posts) -
@Chirag4 said:


I think somewhere in that masturbating post, he said he was a programmer.

 
Seems like all your posts reference masturbation. Welcome to puberty.
#45 Posted by Chirag4 (585 posts) -
@Branthog
@Chirag4 said:


I think somewhere in that masturbating post, he said he was a programmer.

 
Seems like all your posts reference masturbation. Welcome to puberty.
Cheers.