#1 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

These things. So before you duders say we're grow men and that we don't care about those, I'm talking about for your kids. Or your future kids. Let's say your hypothetical kid wants to get a new game and it saids T on it and your kid is 10. Would you get it? Or if your kid is 13 and the game has an M. Same question would you get it? My answer would be yes in a way. If I know the game and I deemed it fit I would get it. If I had no history with the game I would do a bit of research first and the decide to get it for him/her or not.

#2 Posted by Asrahn (552 posts) -

Simple matter. I keep myself updated with games at all points. What I deem fit for my child to see is what it will see. That's what parenting is all about.

#3 Posted by Hunter5024 (5630 posts) -

I'd probably let him play up to T until he's like 12. Then I would probably let him have what he wants unless it was something disturbing, or a porn game. I always thought ratings were kind of stupid and really underestimated teens. What 13 year old hasn't heard "Fuck" a trillion times? What 13 year old hasn't said "Fuck" a trillion times?

#4 Posted by Inkerman (1451 posts) -

I'd probably look at the game first. But I think by at least 15 I wouldn't care what they bought unless it was really disturbing. But that's Australian ratings, which are more concerned about violence and stuff than swearing.

#5 Posted by BraveToaster (12590 posts) -

@Asrahn said:

Simple matter. I keep myself updated with games at all points. What I deem fit for my child to see is what it will see. That's what parenting is all about.

Well said, duder.

#6 Posted by wemibelec90 (1629 posts) -

I plan on basing it on the maturity level of my child. I've played M-rated games since I was about 12 and could easily handle it but another kid might not be able to. That's how I've always looked at it, anyways.

#7 Posted by ManU_Fan10ne (662 posts) -

depends on the game.

#8 Edited by Ducksworth (660 posts) -

If anything, I use a site like Common Sense Media which gives me a better indication of what to expect.

So lets pretend I have a 12 year old kid who wants Uncharted 2 which is something I haven't played before. Although I already know that it's essentially your standard M-rated violent shooter I would go here: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/game-reviews/uncharted-2-among-thieves, expand the "What Parents Need to know" section and see what's up. If I see something that I'd like to look further into I would head to Youtube and look up some gameplay. Once that's all done it would come down to what the kid has played thus far and seeing if it would be a good idea.

#9 Posted by mandude (2669 posts) -

Wasn't there a thread for this just recently enough?

Since my country doesn't have a ratings system, I'll simply use common sense. There are very few games I wouldn't want my kids playing, anyway, and if we had a ratings system, I think I'd mostly ignore it.

#10 Posted by druv (39 posts) -

Were I to have a child, I would rather use my own experience, trailers and quicklooks to decide what is appropriate, rather than an agency with weird priorities and a rulebook that doesn't always consider context.

#11 Posted by ajamafalous (11963 posts) -
@Hunter5024 said:

I'd probably let him play up to T until he's like 12. Then I would probably let him have what he wants unless it was something disturbing, or a porn game. I always thought ratings were kind of stupid and really underestimated teens. What 13 year old hasn't heard "Fuck" a trillion times? What 13 year old hasn't said "Fuck" a trillion times?

Basically this. When I was growing up that kind of stuff started around 11-12. Once your kid hits 6th Grade all bets are off.
#12 Posted by ZeForgotten (10397 posts) -

I'm gonna use common sense when I have kids, so I guess that I'm not following the ESRB ratings (Or.. PEGI in this case)

#13 Edited by pyromagnestir (4299 posts) -

I follow it in so much as when it says nudity I instapurchase.

I have a niece and nephew whom I need to watch on occasion. They are 9 and 7 respectively. I've let my nephew drive around in Mass Effects mako before, and even try to fight some dudes or watch as I do so. I had no problem with it. I also let him ride around on the motorcycles in GTA IV before. I turn the radio off and don't let him know there are guns in the game, and it seems fine. His dad's come down when he was doing these things and hasn't flipped out on me. But normally I steer them to stuff that's more appropriate, but I don't use ratings to say what's appropriate. Since I'm pretty knowledgeable about games I can see when something is not a thing they should be playing or not. But hey, like I said. GTA. So maybe I'm not the best caretaker of young kids.

Online
#14 Posted by Village_Guy (2546 posts) -

Nope, sometimes I look at the PEGI ratings though, I have never used it for anything though.

Well, I sometimes compare the ratings of games I have played and think a bit on whether the ratings are accurate when looking at the content between the games.

For example: Sniper Elite V2 is rated 16, and the game contains detailed and graphic x-ray camera shots of bones being broken and organs being ripped apart while the bullet travels through the victims body. While Medal of Honor and Singularity both contain less detailed violence and significantly less gore, but both are rated 18.

#15 Edited by _Zombie_ (1462 posts) -

I'd prefer using my own common sense instead of going off of what other people think my (future) kid should play.

#16 Posted by Dad_Is_A_Zombie (1225 posts) -

No, I use common sense. There is Halo rated M and there's Max Payne rated M. An informed parent should know the difference.

#17 Edited by believer258 (11808 posts) -

Depends on two very simple things:

1) The content of the game in question

2) The maturity of the child.

ESRB ratings are a good ballpark estimate but Halo is standing on the home plate of the M ballpark and Gears of War 3 is way in the outfield. There are some M rated games that I would let any kid play - the aforementioned Halo - and there are some that I wouldn't let someone play until they were at least 14 - Gears of War.

EDIT: Clarification! I do not actually have any children nor do I expect to until much much later - and much to my family's chagrin I've at least considered not having any at all.

#18 Posted by Dagbiker (6972 posts) -

The only one I pay attention to is the modifyer, "partial nudity" or "nudity" because sometimes I want to see tits. And yes I could watch porn, but having some one throw them at you kinda ruins it.

#19 Posted by ZeForgotten (10397 posts) -
@Dagbiker said:
The only one I pay attention to is the modifyer, "partial nudity" or "nudity" because sometimes I want to see tits. And yes I could watch porn, but having some one throw them at you kinda ruins it.
Unless of course it's a boss fight and one of the attacks is throwing boobs at you. 
#20 Posted by _Zombie_ (1462 posts) -

@believer258 said:

Depends on two very simple things:

1) The content of the game in question

2) The maturity of the child.

ESRB ratings are a good ballpark estimate but Halo is standing on the home plate of the M ballpark and Gears of War 3 is way in the outfield. There are some M rated games that I would let any kid play - the aforementioned Halo - and there are some that I wouldn't let someone play until they were at least 14 - Gears of War.

EDIT: Clarification! I do not actually have any children nor do I expect to until much much later - and much to my family's chagrin I've at least considered not having any at all.

This works, too.

#21 Posted by MetalBaofu (1374 posts) -

@Asrahn said:

Simple matter. I keep myself updated with games at all points. What I deem fit for my child to see is what it will see. That's what parenting is all about.

Yup....that's what I would be doing. If I had kids, that is.

#22 Posted by PerryVandell (2103 posts) -

If I were a parent, I'd use the ESRB ratings as guidelines and go on from there. For example, if my kid's 13 or 14 and wants to play Halo, I'd probably say "that's fine". But if it's a game like Condemned 2 or Manhunt, then I'd wait until they're a little older. On second thought, he or she can play Manhunt when they can buy Manhunt. I'm no stranger to violence or gore, but that game looks fucked up. I'm guessing I'll be a little more lenient towards teen games (when my hypothetical kid's younger than 13) but would still check them out just to be on the safe side.

#23 Posted by Cubical (637 posts) -

No

#24 Posted by Beforet (2916 posts) -

I give out M and AO rated games to school kids out of the back of my unmarked van.

#25 Posted by _Zombie_ (1462 posts) -

@Beforet: You got a stockpile of free candy and duct tape, too? If not, you're doing it wrong.

#26 Posted by CaLe (3960 posts) -

I was allowed to play and watch anything from any age so.. I guess I would be more aware of things in games and movies than my parents were though. Well I don't want to ever have kids so it's not an issue, but I'd probably be pretty lenient unless it's just obscene.

#27 Edited by NTM (7344 posts) -

Yes. I think ESRB is great for parents. I'm not one (yet), but I still know it's very useful, and a lot of parents can at times blindly let their kids play games too "mature" for them until they finally notice what they're playing. I've mentioned this before on another thread, but it'd be a good idea if parents would ask their kid what game they want and before they go to a game store, or buy something online, go on the ESRB website and check the game their child wants, the descriptions are great, and I think once they're used to ESRB enough, they'll know to look at the back of a case if the child hasn't already made up his mind before going to get a game and he/she simply wanted to look. As for me personally, if a game looks appealing to me, the rating or descriptions doesn't matter to me, and since I'm a gamer (if that's what you want to call it), I'll know that in the future when or if I have a kid or kids, I'll know to check ESRB.

#28 Edited by Chop (1996 posts) -

I'd let them play whatever the fuck they want...like I did.

#29 Posted by Irvandus (2877 posts) -

I plan on rating the games myself. Yes you can play this, or no you can't play this. I they're more of a tool for parents that don't play video games themselves.

#30 Posted by mrfizzy (1528 posts) -

I don't have kids but I assume that I will one day. I would have to say that it would depend on the game and the kid.

#31 Posted by Clonedzero (4200 posts) -

im old enough to not have to worry about ratings.

but no, i wouldnt follow them if i was buying stuff for my nonexistent kid, i'd follow common sense instead. im well enough in the "know" of video games to be able to judge what games are suitable for what age kids.

same thing with movie ratings.

hell ratings in general are kinda god damn stupid. like there are super tame R rated movies, then theres stuff like torture porn movies. both rated R, but that means NOTHING. same with games. as others have pointed out, theres games like Halo, or Skyrim, both rated M, but pretty damn tame. then theres crazy hardcore violent games rated M too. kinda renders the whole M rating pointless if you look at it.

almost every 360 game i own is rated M, i think batman AC is the only non-M rated game i have. but i have a bunch of games i'd easily let little kids play.

ratings are for people who arent informed on the subject. if you are, then they dont really mean anything.

#32 Posted by Zleunamme (655 posts) -

I made this a while back for a self-made project. They are new ratings for political pundits and blowhards who think that video games are the root of all evil. It was done in Adobe Illustrator.

#33 Posted by Vinny_Says (5700 posts) -

In this day and age it is incredibly easy to be informed when it comes to such matters, I would rather get informed on my own than follow some sticker.

#34 Posted by troll93 (385 posts) -

I will actual do parenting, by which I mean I will check on my child when they are doing things and make sure they understand that it is not real.

#35 Posted by DillonWerner (1526 posts) -

I think most of the stuff in T rated games aren't as bad as most children shows anyways.

#36 Posted by addictedtopinescent (3645 posts) -

Depends on the child and game, I'd let any reasonably mature 12 or 13 year old play Halo, probably not MK9 or something

#37 Posted by mandude (2669 posts) -

@Zleunamme: Time to print these out and go around to some game shops...

#38 Edited by crusader8463 (14419 posts) -

I never look at them, and if I should ever be burdened with a child down the road I still wouldn't look at them. I would hopefully know my child well enough and still be as informed with gaming to know if I feel that it's a game that's good for them to play or not. I would pretty much let them play whatever they wanted to to be honest anyway. I grew up watching gore/nudity filled action/horror movies at a very young age so it would be rather hypocritical of me to not allow my child to do the same if they wanted to. Though if I felt that they as a person could not handle or understand that what they are seeing is just entertainment and nothing else then I wouldn't allow them to.

#39 Posted by MikeGosot (3227 posts) -

I'll try to keep up with my children hobbies, be it videogames, books, TV shows, or whatever.

#40 Posted by SJSchmidt93 (4894 posts) -

Well my Mom didn't/doesn't give two shits what I watched/played at all, and I turned out fine. But to assume that my kid would as well would probably be a mistake, so I think I would care about them.

#41 Posted by iam3green (14390 posts) -

maybe i don't really know. i never really thought about it as i don't have any kids.

i guess i would make sure he/she doesn't have a mic when he is playing call of duty 200. i find 12 year olds screaming nigger is annoying.

#42 Posted by Jay444111 (2441 posts) -

The ESRB website has some pretty hilarious descriptions of what you can do in certain games... like in Super Scribblenauts it is obvious they fucked around ALOT because they themselves said that you can attach a piece of steak to a baby and have a dingo eat them, Or something of that nature... so yeah, they had fun with that one!

#43 Posted by Dagbiker (6972 posts) -
@iam3green

maybe i don't really know. i never really thought about it as i don't have any kids.

i guess i would make sure he/she doesn't have a mic when he is playing call of duty 200. i find 12 year olds screaming nigger is annoying.

Online interactions not rated by the esrb.
#44 Posted by mtcantor (947 posts) -

As a 28 year old who will probably have kids in the next few years, I have thought about this a lot.

While the ratings are useful, I think, I have the good luck of being a highly informed consumer when it comes to video games. I think I will make case-by-case determinations on what games my kids can and can't play.