#1 Posted by super2j (1654 posts) -

So I was just looking at Dolphin and it occurred to me that with the new more PC based consoles, there is going to be even more precedent for games to come to the PC. I could see a reason to make a ps3 and 360 emulator considering they had many games that will never see a PC release. But if we can expect most games to be ported, then is there any point to making one? Anyone have any insight on this based on how previous generations played out?

Btw, I expect Nintendo devices to be the exception to the rule.

And please keep the bullshit about whether this is legal or illegal out of this, like with most things, it depends on the user.

#2 Posted by JasonR86 (9611 posts) -

No.

#3 Posted by Hunkulese (2652 posts) -

Games not being ported to the PC had very little to do with the technical aspect.

#4 Posted by IrrelevantJohn (1032 posts) -

no

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#5 Edited by afabs515 (1014 posts) -

nope.

#6 Posted by Demoskinos (14579 posts) -

no

#7 Edited by ChrisTaran (1569 posts) -

There will always be things about the system that differ from a standard PC configuration that will need to be emulated. So, no.

#8 Edited by joshwent (2143 posts) -

Many groups who create emulators and rip ROMs do so out of a sense of archiving gaming history. Sad though it may be, there's going to be a time not to far from now when all the original classic game hardware (Atari, Intellivision, etc.) just stops working. Same for the disks/cartridges with the games themselves. Emulators are really the only things reliably keeping those games alive.

The physical media is of course far more robust now, so say your GTA V disk from today will last a crazy long time compared to your pong cart from 1975, but it's not unthinkable that even the next gen consoles to play those games on might be hard to find a century from now (if the human race even lasts that long). So even though there might be many more PC ports, folks still have the urge to keep those console versions playable on other hardware.

So yeah, no.

#9 Posted by BurningStickMan (201 posts) -

Maybe one day, but only because it seems progressively more complicated to emulate newer consoles. Absolutely rock-solid, reliable emulators aren't really available after the PS1, and even that's debatable. There's still no N64 emulator that runs every game with sound, full speed, and full compatibility like you can find for any NES or SNES game.

As consoles have more purpose built components, they seem to become harder to emulate and/or need significantly more computer power to virtualize all the components. Eventually it seems that people hit something they can't reverse engineer, or the idea just loses interest. Can you imagine trying to RE and emulate something like the Cell processor? And this is before we've even gotten into whatever security measures newer consoles might have.

#10 Posted by I_Stay_Puft (3053 posts) -

nope.

#11 Edited by Oscar__Explosion (2204 posts) -

Lol no

#12 Posted by GrantHeaslip (1532 posts) -

@burningstickman said:

Maybe one day, but only because it seems progressively more complicated to emulate newer consoles. Absolutely rock-solid, reliable emulators aren't really available after the PS1, and even that's debatable. There's still no N64 emulator that runs every game with sound, full speed, and full compatibility like you can find for any NES or SNES game.

As consoles have more purpose built components, they seem to become harder to emulate and/or need significantly more computer power to virtualize all the components. Eventually it seems that people hit something they can't reverse engineer, or the idea just loses interest. Can you imagine trying to RE and emulate something like the Cell processor? And this is before we've even gotten into whatever security measures newer consoles might have.

In terms of emulatability, I get the sense it's way more of an issue of power than complexity. I remember hearing that the PS2 can be kind of messed up from a developer point of view, but emulation of it seems to be fairly solid. The Sega Saturn was reportedly a complicated bitch to program for, and based on a bit of googling, it's a solved problem emulation-wise.

I also remember there being a distinction between emulators that are 100% accurate at the (great) expense of CPU usage, and emulators that aim for playability because making flawless emulation isn't computationally feasible yet. So basically, PS3 emulation might be hard now, but I bet they'll be there in 10 years.

You bring up a good point about security measures, though those always seem to eventually get cracked. Online integration could also make going back and playing something like Mass Effect 3 weird when they're abandoned.

(Not endorsing emulation in cases where games are still being sold, but I'm glad its being worked on in terms of preserving games in the long term.)

#13 Posted by TheManWithNoPlan (5266 posts) -

You already know.

#14 Edited by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

Nah, how else would players play their old games?

Let's assume you were pointing to new console emulators, eventually, yes. They're getting too hard to emulate. I would say, emulations will still exist but only with the old consoles.

#15 Posted by Video_Game_King (36075 posts) -

@burningstickman said:

In terms of emulatability, I get the sense it's way more of an issue of power than complexity. I remember hearing that the PS2 can be kind of messed up from a developer point of view, but emulation of it seems to be fairly solid. The Sega Saturn was reportedly a complicated bitch to program for, and based on a bit of googling, it's a solved problem emulation-wise.

Oh hell no. The most reliable Saturn emulator is still a complete pain to deal with. And that's with a relatively well-known system. The more esoteric the system, the spottier the emulation.

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#16 Posted by HellknightLeon (452 posts) -

nope

#17 Posted by GrantHeaslip (1532 posts) -

@grantheaslip said:

@burningstickman said:

In terms of emulatability, I get the sense it's way more of an issue of power than complexity. I remember hearing that the PS2 can be kind of messed up from a developer point of view, but emulation of it seems to be fairly solid. The Sega Saturn was reportedly a complicated bitch to program for, and based on a bit of googling, it's a solved problem emulation-wise.

Oh hell no. The most reliable Saturn emulator is still a complete pain to deal with. And that's with a relatively well-known system. The more esoteric the system, the spottier the emulation.

Okay, noted. But to be clear, are you talking about esoteric from a developer point of view, or esoteric from a gamer point of view? I'd assume both complexity and lack of interest are big factors in Saturn emulators being messy.

#18 Posted by TruthTellah (8570 posts) -

#19 Posted by Video_Game_King (36075 posts) -

@grantheaslip:

Esoteric from a gamer's point of view, although I don't think I'd ever acknowledged that there was much of a difference. Besides, I'd say there's at least some interest in Saturn emulation, what with Princess Crown on the verge of finally being fan translated and all.

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#20 Posted by Abendlaender (2768 posts) -

Yes.

Haha! TWIST

#21 Posted by alwaysbebombing (1539 posts) -

Fuck no. Some of us can't afford a DS.

#22 Posted by ShaggE (6343 posts) -

Nope. Legal grey areas (and straight up piracy in many cases) aside, emulators are essential for archivists. No console (or legacy PC build) will be around forever, and there will always be games that don't see ports. Not because of tech, either.

Also, if there's even the slightest difference in versions of a game, it should be archived as well. Admittedly, I'm a bit crazy about preservation, but yeah.

#23 Posted by geirr (2483 posts) -

They'll outlive the internet.

#24 Posted by PandaBear (1310 posts) -

Have you been on the internet before? The fucking Space Jam website is still online. None of this will disappear. And as time moves on console we consider a generation old will be emulated on our iPhone 10s.

#25 Posted by BurningStickMan (201 posts) -

@video_game_king said:

@grantheaslip said:

@burningstickman said:

In terms of emulatability, I get the sense it's way more of an issue of power than complexity. I remember hearing that the PS2 can be kind of messed up from a developer point of view, but emulation of it seems to be fairly solid. The Sega Saturn was reportedly a complicated bitch to program for, and based on a bit of googling, it's a solved problem emulation-wise.

Oh hell no. The most reliable Saturn emulator is still a complete pain to deal with. And that's with a relatively well-known system. The more esoteric the system, the spottier the emulation.

Okay, noted. But to be clear, are you talking about esoteric from a developer point of view, or esoteric from a gamer point of view? I'd assume both complexity and lack of interest are big factors in Saturn emulators being messy.

Same with the Atari Jaguar. Even less interest, but also esoteric from a developer view. The 68k was supposed to send requests to the two Tom and Jerry chips to do the actual rendering. I don't think anyone's been able to fully RE the blitter, and/or exactly emulate those chips and that network. (In short, there still aren't any good Jag emulators, and that fucker's from 1994).