#1 Posted by astrotriforce (1326 posts) -
#2 Posted by one_2nd (2359 posts) -

Assuming yes = positive, a. 

#3 Posted by TotalEklypse (1000 posts) -

yoo haz 2 questionz of day?! 
 
isnt that like a paradox or something?

#4 Posted by Yummylee (21254 posts) -

Depends on the games. Nowadays there's a whole genre of gaming to educate kids n such.

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#5 Posted by JJWeatherman (14557 posts) -

If they're gaming, they can't be dealing drugs.

#6 Posted by astrotriforce (1326 posts) -

Dag nabit. :P I meant to put A. Positive, B. Negative. I've been up since 2am forgive me. :P 
 
Pretty sure you can't edit the poll answers once they've already been put up right? 
 
Anyway, I think most people will pick yes, but WHY do you think videogames are positive for kids? In my humble opinion, videogames are positive because they teach kids how to read, or force them to read, in a way that is fun and they want to learn so they can play the game. 
 
My brother had pretty bad dyslexia when he was young and I'm convinced his love of RPGs like Final Fantasy really helped him learn to read and grow his vocubalary. Cause he loved the stories and would not skip the text. 
 
I also believe that videogames really help to spur creativity . I don't know about you, but when I went outside to play, I had a gun on my arm like Samus/Mega Man and would shoot fireballs like Ryu. A ton of videogames would influence my real-world playing (as well as cartoons, obviously). Any of you remember "play fighting" as Mortal Kombat characters? My dad always tells a funny story of hearing us kids playing outside and hearing us all yell "Get over here!" and he was always like, "What the heck or they doing?" :P He thought it was the funniest thing and didn't know we were mimicking Scorpion from MK. I also think that gaming, obviously, helps with reflex and hand-eye-coordination skills. As well as memory and puzzle solving.

#7 Posted by Gaff (1651 posts) -

Oh, you're making my head hurt. 
 
:(

#8 Posted by astrotriforce (1326 posts) -
@TotalEklypse said:
" yoo haz 2 questionz of day?!  isnt that like a paradox or something? "
LOL. For the first time I actually labeled this one "Gaming" Q of the Day. Should've figured it wouldn't matter. :P
 
@JJWeatherman said:
" If they're gaming, they can't be dealing drugs. "
I think it's easy to do both. :P But I DO believe that it keeps kids occupied in a safe manner. One of my brothers who doesn't game as much would sometimes go doing more dangerous activities outside while me and my other bro were inside playing.
#9 Posted by GunstarRed (5027 posts) -

Only if it's one of those Ubisoft imagine games.
#10 Posted by JoyfullOFrockets (1177 posts) -

I grew up with videogames and I turned out okay. So, I'd figure if I have a kid she/he would too.
 
Of course, they're going to be called all sorts of names for that. Teased, picked on, the works. Then they will realize how many imbecils inhabit this world. And thus, will grow up as people who would never even dream of insulting others just because they have nothing else to do. Videogames will teach them stubborn will, creativity and give them faster reflexes. Of course, I will make every single attempt to make them believe that games are only a means of developing thinking outside the box, to avoid turning them into addicts who don't want contact with the outside world.
 
And if all that seriously happens, I will die a happy man. :)

#11 Posted by MikkaQ (10268 posts) -
@JJWeatherman said:
" If they're gaming, they can't be dealing drugs. "
Tell that to some unsavory children I know.  
 
Also I think it really depends on the game. Some are pretty bad influences on kids, others wouldn't be positive or negative, and then educational software is probably pretty good for kids, I dunno. 
#12 Posted by supermike6 (3540 posts) -

I think it's fantastic for kids. Obviously, everything in moderation, but games such as Zelda can teach problem-solving skills way better than a book can. Also, they are fun! Kids have a lot of time, they need things to do, and video games are a great option I think. I've never had kids, but I grew up playing video games (in moderation) and look at me! 
 
 
...Okay. Bad example.

#13 Posted by CitizenKane (10504 posts) -

It all depends on the context of video games in a kid's life.

#14 Posted by AhmadMetallic (18955 posts) -

maybe

#15 Posted by BraveToaster (12590 posts) -

I don't have a problem with it. It's a hobby, like sports, reading etc.

#16 Posted by Vinchenzo (6192 posts) -

I think it's a negative if it forms a website where some stupid user goes to it and posts 2 pointless questions each day.

#17 Posted by Gaff (1651 posts) -
@CitizenKane: And here I was hoping a moderator would chime in with "moderation is key".
#18 Posted by Azteck (7449 posts) -
@JJWeatherman said:
" If they're gaming, they can't be dealing drugs. "
I'll only let my kids play games which WILL lead them to deal drugs.
#19 Posted by Nubstradamus (15 posts) -

Gaming can be either positive or negative depending on the person.  If taken in moderation, gaming can be a nice getaway from the stresses of the norm and other nuances of life.  On the negative side people can become obsessed with a particular game and forget about their actual life.  As for kids, I've been playing video games since I was 3 and I turned out fine.

#20 Posted by JJWeatherman (14557 posts) -
@Azteck said:
" @JJWeatherman said:
" If they're gaming, they can't be dealing drugs. "
I'll only let my kids play games which WILL lead them to deal drugs. "
GTA Chinatown Wars? Gamecop? :D
#21 Posted by Azteck (7449 posts) -
@JJWeatherman said:
" @Azteck said:
" @JJWeatherman said:
" If they're gaming, they can't be dealing drugs. "
I'll only let my kids play games which WILL lead them to deal drugs. "
GTA Chinatown Wars? Gamecop? :D "
Gotta teach them that the extacy prices are better on the other side of town, dawg.
#22 Posted by CookieMonster (2416 posts) -

Yes, depends on the kid though. If they have mental problems or something, I'd consider restricting how much and what they play.

#23 Posted by TaliciaDragonsong (8698 posts) -

Gaming, just like any book or movie, can be a very inspirational activity for children.
Being a fan of Mario will make the kid try to draw him or maybe even try to learn a instrument to play those catchy songs.
I still remember trying to draw Nintendo stuff as a child :x

#24 Posted by Yummylee (21254 posts) -
@TaliciaDragonsong said:
" Gaming, just like any book or movie, can be a very inspirational activity for children. Being a fan of Mario will make the kid try to draw him or maybe even try to learn a instrument to play those catchy songs. I still remember trying to draw Nintendo stuff as a child :x "
I too remember trying to draw Crash Bandicoot once, growing up. He more resembled some blurry mess of a texture than anything. T.T
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#25 Edited by sparks50 (372 posts) -

The vote is poorly-formulated. Im not sure what to take from it.
 
I think Gaming is a completely OK activity, but not in excessive amounts.

#26 Posted by Meowayne (6084 posts) -
@sparks50 said:
" The vote is poorly-formulated."
This, and what other people said. Every pasttime is as recreational, beneficial or harmful as the given kid's personality and the given parent's care allow for.
#27 Posted by Manhattan_Project (2119 posts) -
@CitizenKane said:
" It all depends on the context of video games in a kid's life. "
This basically. I was playing GTA at 10 or 11 and I'm a normal person.  
 
Its the same with everything really.
#28 Posted by evanbrau (1162 posts) -

As long as it's kept under control (not spending hours upon hours with them) and age appropriate (no GTA, CoD etc which would have the added bonus of keeping the kiddywinks out of multiplayer games) then I see no problem with kids playing games. As far as I know they've been proven to help with motor skills, hand eye coordination etc.

#29 Edited by SethPhotopoulos (5107 posts) -

As long as they aren't making it their entire social life.

#30 Posted by azhang (111 posts) -

Gaming helps your reflexes so yes.

#31 Posted by Kyreo (4600 posts) -

I would rather my (future) kids do something creative instead of watch TV or play video games.  By creative I mean... read a book, draw, write, or anything mentally stimulating. 
 
I think video games, depending on the game, are destructive because they require little to no mental stimulation.  Games like Halo, MW2, or any shooter require zero effort mentally but games like Hexic, Brain Age, or any puzzle game is constructive.

#32 Posted by ComradeKritstov (693 posts) -

Positive if combined with good parenting (explaining that is only a video game and making sure the child knows the difference between real life and video games).

#33 Posted by Dany (7887 posts) -

Depends on the game and the kid and what they get out of it. My niece has Cooking Mama for her dsi, Mario Kart and very few ubisoft image or imagine games. THose seem like good games for her but they are not deteriorating her mind. Someone at that age playing Chinatown Wars and other stuff of htat caliber at 10ish should not happen

#34 Posted by Brendan (7687 posts) -

It's hard to say.  Honestly, although I love videogames, I don't think they're very beneficial.  That's not to say that I think kids should spend all their time studying or doing flash cards or something, but gaming is really just a hobby that makes you sit on the couch.  It's a perfectly okay part of a balanced lifestyle (grrrrrrreat line!) but if I had kids I would rather they play outside and get excercise (not that I would force them all the time).
#35 Posted by Bones8677 (3210 posts) -

What kind of question is that? Why would gaming enthusiasts say that gaming is a negative?

#36 Posted by Herocide (440 posts) -

Yes.

#37 Posted by EvilMuffin (133 posts) -

I've been playing games since I was 5 and I turned out fairly normal. I think it's fine as long as the parents watch what their kids play.

#38 Posted by Zoolander (34 posts) -

Kids gaming can be a positive thing, but not if they have unrestricted access to it, then it can become a negative.

#39 Posted by AgentJ (8778 posts) -

There is definitely a minimum age I'll keep my kids from playing games until. I've seen children of other parents whose kids didn't quite turn out right after starting gaming at very young ages (2-4). And nearly all of them seem to wear glasses. 

#40 Posted by Hourai (2795 posts) -

It's more negative than positive for a kid to be playing video games. It depends on what they play and how often they play it, but other hobbies like reading or drawing would help more for growing up.

#41 Posted by astrotriforce (1326 posts) -

Interesting thanks guys. :) 
 
@TaliciaDragonsong said:

" Gaming, just like any book or movie, can be a very inspirational activity for children. Being a fan of Mario will make the kid try to draw him or maybe even try to learn a instrument to play those catchy songs. I still remember trying to draw Nintendo stuff as a child :x "
GREAT point and that's what I meant about creativity! I totally agree, I would try to draw them as well. In addition to "playing them" or taking inspiration while playing outside from games.
#42 Posted by Onno10 (405 posts) -

As long as there's no addiction; yes

#43 Posted by CletusTheFoetus (148 posts) -

A. 
 
Anything that gets kids interested in a subject, wether that's engineering, design or beating ho's. 
 
I remember playing Star Fox 64 aged 9 and reviewing it for Official Nintendo Magazine. I was in the pocket of nintendo at the time, sorry.  
Also, I reckon I made the first team based RPG Star Trek game concept. Thing is you only got to control Jean Luc.  
 
So yeah, ultimately a positive thing but there's a lot more to life than one thing.

#44 Posted by HitmanAgent47 (8576 posts) -

Well I was introduced to gaming when I was 5, maybe it was too early because I play way too much videogames. Maybe it's more postive to be introduced to it later, so it's not a negative and kids will do more homework.

#45 Posted by iam3green (14390 posts) -

i would say that it is positive for kids. some games you would learn small things about stuff. it can also help build problem solving skills.