#1 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

So I've been looking into getting a gaming headset for my PS3, PC, and sometimes the 360. I've lowered it down to 2 models the Astro A30s for 200 and Sony Pulse 7.1 headset for 150. I wanted to know which is a better set of headphones over all I am leaning towards the Sony Pulse for the lower price even though it won't work with my 360, but if the Astros are that much better I am willing to spend the money

#2 Posted by kingofpeanuts (479 posts) -

I would suggest the A40's. Tested did a test on a bunch of them and they said those were the best. Also the GB guys use them, I am pretty sure.

#3 Posted by Athadam (692 posts) -

Okay so, what type of "gaming" are you into? Is this set for more atmospheric games where the music and tone sets the game (something like the Walking Dead), do you want headphones that you can use for gaming, music, and movies, or are you more into first person shooters where sound direction matters more?

#4 Posted by Athadam (692 posts) -

@kingofpeanuts said:

I would suggest the A40's. Tested did a test on a bunch of them and they said those were the best. Also the GB guys use them, I am pretty sure.

I wouldn't recommend the Astros generally because they are too expensive - they really are for a small market of people who know what they want with a gaming headphone.

#5 Posted by yoshisaur (2723 posts) -

@kingofpeanuts said:

I would suggest the A40's. Tested did a test on a bunch of them and they said those were the best. Also the GB guys use them, I am pretty sure.

#6 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

@Castermhief117 said:

Okay so, what type of "gaming" are you into? Is this set for more atmospheric games where the music and tone sets the game (something like the Walking Dead), do you want headphones that you can use for gaming, music, and movies, or are you more into first person shooters where sound direction matters more?

I do intend to use this for music and would like it to work with my vita/iphone at least and I am not a big shooter guy except for Halo, Half Life, and Resistance 1 and 3(story is important to me). My favorite games tend to be stuff like Uncharted, The Walking Dead, Persona 4, halo, infamous, and catherine

#7 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

@Castermhief117 said:

@kingofpeanuts said:

I would suggest the A40's. Tested did a test on a bunch of them and they said those were the best. Also the GB guys use them, I am pretty sure.

I wouldn't recommend the Astros generally because they are too expensive - they really are for a small market of people who know what they want with a gaming headphone.

good to know and proving how blind I am flying.

#8 Edited by Athadam (692 posts) -

Okay, short story about me. I entered the audio journey about two years ago, since then I've had and thoroughly used the Turtle Beaches X41, Astro A40, Astro A30, Tritton AX720, DT 990 600 ohms, and the Sennheiser HD-600s. For all of the "official" gaming headsets, I used them with their respective mixamp except with the HD600 and DT-990 where I used the Astro Mixamp.

I went through this journey because I'm somewhat of an audiophile and because I loved immersive gaming. I can't stand playing video games with the lights on or the volume low, I need my gaming to feel like I'm in a theater. I'm into a bunch of different genres of games and I've used these various headphones for all of them. I've played pretty much the same games you've played (Walking Dead, Persona, Uncharted) but I also heavily into competitive console FPS, so Modern Warfare 3, Halo 4.

If you ever get into competitive in Call of Duty, you'd know that everyone who's serious uses a headset. More specifically, a headset that has a mixamp with Dolby Headphone tech (it makes stereo headphones sound surround sound). In these types of games, it's an extremely huge advantage to have headsets because you can always tell where people are running - it becomes almost like a audio wall hack. This is because the Call of Duty developers specifically map the game's audio so that you can really tell directionality. However, in most other games, the audio will not be mapped as well.

This is one reason why I don't recommend headsets that are specifically for competitive gaming, because they aren't as useful in normal games. Furthermore, gaming headsets are never really designed for audio fidelity, they are designed more for competitive play and chat. If that's not what you are looking for, there are still other options. But I'm going to quickly review these gaming headphones that I currently have:

Astro A40's with the Astro Mixamp

The Astro A40's with their mixamp costs 300 dollars (that's just as much as a console). They are extremely comfortable, have amazing build quality (they're more flexible than you'd think), they look amazing, they have a decent mic, and the audio is perfect for competitive gaming (enhanced trebles). But if you ever listen to music with them, the bass doesn't have the impact that you might want, and the midrange isn't that focused. I haven't tried a movie with them, but I suspect it'll be the same as music. If someone took away my current gaming headset set up and gave me the Astro A40's, I'd be okay with it. They're incredible - but only for what I want and my needs.

Turtle Beach X41 with DSS

I bought the Turtle Beach X41's for 45 dollars - refurbished. But they are 120-130 retail. They're decently comfortable, the pad is soft and nice but the head clamp is a little too tight for me. They don't look nearly as nice as the Astro A40's and the build is very plasticky. But I gave them a shot and plugged them into my Xbox 360 and played some normal games and Call of Duty with them.

They were pretty darn good. Sound directionality was almost as good as the Astros because their amps have the same Dolby Headphone technology. The mic is also very receptive to outside noise, and even though there is an mic input volume dial on the amp which I turned down, it still picked up any noise in my room. I did encounter a bit of hissing and buzzing because the mic's jack isn't good. The amp has the function to boost the bass, so if you're really into explosions, you'd enjoy these headphones. But overall, I didn't have as much of an enjoyable experience with the Turtle Beaches - but given the price they're a huge value.

Tritton AX720 with Tritton amp

The Trittons cost about 129.99 and are okay for the price. I found a refurbished set for 80 dollars and jumped on it. Unlike the Turtle Beaches, these headphones look amazing. Aside from build quality, they look even better than the Astros. I'm just going to cut to the chase:

Quick Review:

- Looks good, plasticky build quality (feels like you can break it easily if you sit on them accidentally)

- The headband feels hollow with a plastic shell

- Varies in comfortability, I didn't like it but some of my friends love the way they feel.

- Sound quality is mediocre. Directionality isn't as pin point as the Astros or the Turtle Beaches, but still good enough.

- I tried listening to music with them and the sound is very flat - it's not a very fun headphone to listen with.

- I only recommend them for people who play game competitively but want a bargain.

#9 Edited by Athadam (692 posts) -

Those three are the typical console headsets and brands that you'd find.

I don't recommend any of them fully, but I wanted to show you what to look for in gaming headsets and features.

Here is the set up that I use - it's much more expensive than these headsets but it can be modified to fit your budget. Instead of using a gaming headset, I use an audiophile music headset for everything.

I use the Sennheiser HD-600 ($400) with a Fiio E9 ($100) amp to boost the volume from the Astro Mixamp ($130). If I'm gaming online, I use an external boom mic to talk. This set up fits my needs in every way, if I want to listen to music, I pair the HD-600 with the FiiO E9 amp and connect it to my iPhone/PC. If I want to play games, I connect the two to my Astro Mixamp (which is connected to the Xbox/PS3/PC via optical).

I get the same surround sound that professional gamers get but also high fidelity audio when I want to. This set up has been perfect for me for about a year now, but I still use the Turtle Beaches, Astros, and Trittons for gaming occasionally.

Here's what I recommend to you:

1. Buy an amp that has Dolby Headphone technology, perhaps this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Turtle-Surround-Processor-Xbox-360-63043006306200/dp/B006W41X36/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1354012364&sr=8-3&keywords=turtle+beach+dss

The DSS/Amp will connect to your computer/PS3/Xbox 360 via optical and USB.

Buying an amp like this will let you experience virtual surround sound and immerse your more into games.

2. Then buy a musical pair of headphones that you like and plug them into the amp when you want to game and into your computer/ipod when you want to chill out and listen to music. A common headphone that I recommend is the Sony XB500. It has extremely low and impacting bass and clear highs - although the midrange is somewhat recessed (but still great). It's optimal for genres like hip hop, rap, electronic, modern rock, etc. For everything else, it's only "good" for. You can audition these headphones at any Best Buy retailer next to the overpriced Beats and Bose. They're certainly the most best headphones for 60-80 dollars.

Other notes about the XB-500s:

- By far the most comfortable headphones I've owned, the two pads are so thick that they are almost like pillows

- Because of this, they may get warm on your ears after prolonged use.

- The cord is short, you may need a 3.5mm extension cord.

- They look really cool and the build quality is decent

I hope this write up has helped you or anyone else who may be reading. If you're interested, let me know what your musical preferences are so I may recommend other headphones beside the XB-500. Good luck!

#10 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

@Castermhief117 said:

Those three are the typical console headsets and brands that you'd find.

I don't recommend any of them fully, but I wanted to show you what to look for in gaming headsets and features.

Here is the set up that I use - it's much more expensive than these headsets but it can be modified to fit your budget. Instead of using a gaming headset, I use an audiophile music headset for everything.

I use the Sennheiser HD-600 ($400) with a Fiio E9 ($100) amp to boost the volume from the Astro Mixamp ($130). If I'm gaming online, I use an external boom mic to talk. This set up fits my needs in every way, if I want to listen to music, I pair the HD-600 with the FiiO E9 amp and connect it to my iPhone/PC. If I want to play games, I connect the two to my Astro Mixamp (which is connected to the Xbox/PS3/PC via optical).

I get the same surround sound that professional gamers get but also high fidelity audio when I want to. This set up has been perfect for me for about a year now, but I still use the Turtle Beaches, Astros, and Trittons for gaming occasionally.

Here's what I recommend to you:

1. Buy an amp that has Dolby Headphone technology, perhaps this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Turtle-Surround-Processor-Xbox-360-63043006306200/dp/B006W41X36/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1354012364&sr=8-3&keywords=turtle+beach+dss

The DSS/Amp will connect to your computer/PS3/Xbox 360 via optical and USB.

Buying an amp like this will let you experience virtual surround sound and immerse your more into games.

2. Then buy a musical pair of headphones that you like and plug them into the amp when you want to game and into your computer/ipod when you want to chill out and listen to music. A common headphone that I recommend is the Sony XB500. It has extremely low and impacting bass and clear highs - although the midrange is somewhat recessed (but still great). It's optimal for genres like hip hop, rap, electronic, modern rock, etc. For everything else, it's only "good" for. You can audition these headphones at any Best Buy retailer next to the overpriced Beats and Bose. They're certainly the most best headphones for 60-80 dollars.

Other notes about the XB-500s:

- By far the most comfortable headphones I've owned, the two pads are so thick that they are almost like pillows

- Because of this, they may get warm on your ears after prolonged use.

- The cord is short, you may need a 3.5mm extension cord.

- They look really cool and the build quality is decent

I hope this write up has helped you or anyone else who may be reading. If you're interested, let me know what your musical preferences are so I may recommend other headphones beside the XB-500. Good luck!

Holy crap this is a lot of information, didn't think finding a good set of multi device headphones for games like walking dead and uncharted would need this much info god damn

#11 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

@sarge1445 said:

@Castermhief117 said:

Those three are the typical console headsets and brands that you'd find.

I don't recommend any of them fully, but I wanted to show you what to look for in gaming headsets and features.

Here is the set up that I use - it's much more expensive than these headsets but it can be modified to fit your budget. Instead of using a gaming headset, I use an audiophile music headset for everything.

I use the Sennheiser HD-600 ($400) with a Fiio E9 ($100) amp to boost the volume from the Astro Mixamp ($130). If I'm gaming online, I use an external boom mic to talk. This set up fits my needs in every way, if I want to listen to music, I pair the HD-600 with the FiiO E9 amp and connect it to my iPhone/PC. If I want to play games, I connect the two to my Astro Mixamp (which is connected to the Xbox/PS3/PC via optical).

I get the same surround sound that professional gamers get but also high fidelity audio when I want to. This set up has been perfect for me for about a year now, but I still use the Turtle Beaches, Astros, and Trittons for gaming occasionally.

Here's what I recommend to you:

1. Buy an amp that has Dolby Headphone technology, perhaps this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Turtle-Surround-Processor-Xbox-360-63043006306200/dp/B006W41X36/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1354012364&sr=8-3&keywords=turtle+beach+dss

The DSS/Amp will connect to your computer/PS3/Xbox 360 via optical and USB.

Buying an amp like this will let you experience virtual surround sound and immerse your more into games.

2. Then buy a musical pair of headphones that you like and plug them into the amp when you want to game and into your computer/ipod when you want to chill out and listen to music. A common headphone that I recommend is the Sony XB500. It has extremely low and impacting bass and clear highs - although the midrange is somewhat recessed (but still great). It's optimal for genres like hip hop, rap, electronic, modern rock, etc. For everything else, it's only "good" for. You can audition these headphones at any Best Buy retailer next to the overpriced Beats and Bose. They're certainly the most best headphones for 60-80 dollars.

Other notes about the XB-500s:

- By far the most comfortable headphones I've owned, the two pads are so thick that they are almost like pillows

- Because of this, they may get warm on your ears after prolonged use.

- The cord is short, you may need a 3.5mm extension cord.

- They look really cool and the build quality is decent

I hope this write up has helped you or anyone else who may be reading. If you're interested, let me know what your musical preferences are so I may recommend other headphones beside the XB-500. Good luck!

Holy crap this is a lot of information, didn't think finding a good set of multi device headphones for games like walking dead and uncharted would need this much info god damn

ok so I got to ask out of the 2 I listed which do you think would be the better option

#12 Posted by terrible (18 posts) -

@Castermhief117 said:

Those three are the typical console headsets and brands that you'd find.

I don't recommend any of them fully, but I wanted to show you what to look for in gaming headsets and features.

Here is the set up that I use - it's much more expensive than these headsets but it can be modified to fit your budget. Instead of using a gaming headset, I use an audiophile music headset for everything.

I use the Sennheiser HD-600 ($400) with a Fiio E9 ($100) amp to boost the volume from the Astro Mixamp ($130). If I'm gaming online, I use an external boom mic to talk. This set up fits my needs in every way, if I want to listen to music, I pair the HD-600 with the FiiO E9 amp and connect it to my iPhone/PC. If I want to play games, I connect the two to my Astro Mixamp (which is connected to the Xbox/PS3/PC via optical).

I get the same surround sound that professional gamers get but also high fidelity audio when I want to. This set up has been perfect for me for about a year now, but I still use the Turtle Beaches, Astros, and Trittons for gaming occasionally.

Here's what I recommend to you:

1. Buy an amp that has Dolby Headphone technology, perhaps this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Turtle-Surround-Processor-Xbox-360-63043006306200/dp/B006W41X36/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1354012364&sr=8-3&keywords=turtle+beach+dss

The DSS/Amp will connect to your computer/PS3/Xbox 360 via optical and USB.

Buying an amp like this will let you experience virtual surround sound and immerse your more into games.

2. Then buy a musical pair of headphones that you like and plug them into the amp when you want to game and into your computer/ipod when you want to chill out and listen to music. A common headphone that I recommend is the Sony XB500. It has extremely low and impacting bass and clear highs - although the midrange is somewhat recessed (but still great). It's optimal for genres like hip hop, rap, electronic, modern rock, etc. For everything else, it's only "good" for. You can audition these headphones at any Best Buy retailer next to the overpriced Beats and Bose. They're certainly the most best headphones for 60-80 dollars.

Other notes about the XB-500s:

- By far the most comfortable headphones I've owned, the two pads are so thick that they are almost like pillows

- Because of this, they may get warm on your ears after prolonged use.

- The cord is short, you may need a 3.5mm extension cord.

- They look really cool and the build quality is decent

I hope this write up has helped you or anyone else who may be reading. If you're interested, let me know what your musical preferences are so I may recommend other headphones beside the XB-500. Good luck!

Basically the perfect setup.

I'd recommend headphones with a good soundstage and low bass for online shooters where you need to pinpoint footsteps and such over something like those XB-500s though. For atmospheric single player games I'm sure it'd be fine (probably even ideal), but something like the Audio Technica ATH-AD700s would be better for online shooters because of the massive soundstage and low bass.

#13 Posted by Mnemoidian (955 posts) -

Using Astro A40's, they're pretty great. I like them.

That said, I got a Mixamp when I got the A40's, but it's been nothing but a headache. The microphone quality has been terrible, and after a while, I get a buzzing sound in the headphones... to the point where I've entirely stopped using the Mixamp after having 2 mixamps replaced (including all cables). They believe the problem is on my end. Power surge from USB or wall socket, or something.

Summary: I like Astro A40. I don't like Astro Mixamp, but that might be on my end.

#14 Posted by djou (875 posts) -

If you're looking to do some long gaming sessions I would recommend against the Sony Pulse 7.1 headsets. The cups don't surround the ear but they are over the ear. This is okay for short stints but you really need something like the Tritton AX720 for comfort. The build quality may not be as nice and they look kinda goofy but its better than having your ears compressed against your head for five hours.

#15 Posted by me3639 (1756 posts) -

I cannot hype the A50's enough. No wires and the sound is incredible. Best technological purchase i have made in a long time.

#16 Posted by huntad (1939 posts) -

@Castermhief117: What about the Astro A30s? You said you used them, right? Are they good?

#17 Posted by Branwulf (406 posts) -

I'm using the A50's and while they are really good, they are really, really, expensive, honestly i'm not sure i'd recommend them to anyone over cheaper alternatives. They don't have any analogue option either which really annoys me.

#18 Posted by Sammo21 (3276 posts) -

I personally can't justify spending $250 on a headset personally. I guess if I were in a position where I felt I absolutely needed them because of kids or something I would feel a little differently.

#19 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Sammo21 said:

I personally can't justify spending $250 on a headset personally. I guess if I were in a position where I felt I absolutely needed them because of kids or something I would feel a little differently.

It depends how you think of it, if you go the amp route so you can plug in any pair of headphones then it's easier because you can then use them for music, and well, everything. Decent headphones last a long time too, I have some Senn 595s that are nearly 5 years old, they still sound brilliant.

The problem is with consoles if you don't have an amplifier that supports Dolby Headphone (I don't think many AV amps even do this) then you gotta go the mix amp route or put up with stereo. Not that stereo is bad, but Dolby Headphone makes it so much better, my PC soundcard does Dolby Headphone so I game using headphones on there, otherwise I just use 5.1 speakers for consoles. (including when I'm on the couch with the TV for controller friendly PC games)

I'm not sure if I'd spend the money just for gaming on headphones, it's difficult to say now because I'm so used to using these awesome headphones that it's hard to imagine not having them and how much it would bother me.

Edit: I also don't trust any of these gaming headset manufacturers to produce good headsets. I bought a very highly rated headset once that cost quite a lot of money and it was garbage, so I'm never buying a headset/headphones again unless they're from a "real" audio manufacturer, the only Astro product I'd ever consider is the mixamp but I don't really need that since I have 5.1 speakers for consoles and it'd be hassle moving my headphones between desk and couch all the damn time.

#20 Edited by Athadam (692 posts) -

@sarge1445 : I don't know enough about the Sony's to say anything about them and the only time I've tried the A30's was 2 years ago (before my audio journey) and it was for music. From what I recall, the A30's were just alright for music - biggest thing I didn't like about them were the fact they were on ear and not around the ear.

#21 Posted by Sammo21 (3276 posts) -

@Sooty:

I also have a pair of the wireless Logitech gaming headphones for my PC...I think they are G35 (in the same room as my wife's sewing stuff, which can get loud) and I love them. Would be nice if I could just use them on my PS3 or 360 lol.

#22 Posted by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Sammo21 said:

@Sooty:

I also have a pair of the wireless Logitech gaming headphones for my PC...I think they are G35 (in the same room as my wife's sewing stuff, which can get loud) and I love them. Would be nice if I could just use them on my PS3 or 360 lol.

I used to have their Z-5500 speaker system which was quite brilliant, definitely one of my favourite manufacturers for a lot of stuff, really great customer support too.

#23 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

@djou said:

If you're looking to do some long gaming sessions I would recommend against the Sony Pulse 7.1 headsets. The cups don't surround the ear but they are over the ear. This is okay for short stints but you really need something like the Tritton AX720 for comfort. The build quality may not be as nice and they look kinda goofy but its better than having your ears compressed against your head for five hours.

huh I tried them at PAX and they seemed pretty comfy then again it was only a 5 minute demo, but I was really impressed the Pulse tech was need the fact that it simulated the rumble when explosions and shit went off. I really wish I would have tried the Astros when I was at PAX to make this decision far easier haha

#24 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

so anyone going to answer my original question haha?

#25 Posted by djou (875 posts) -

@sarge1445: Build quality and sound on the Pulse are awesome, they just don't cup your ears, they go over them. Maybe this doesn't bother you but for gaming headphones I think its a feature I always look out for. For instance I have a pair of Grados I use for listening to music on my stereo. The sound clarity is great but my ears ache from having them compressed against the side of my head during long listens. Headsets like the Astros are bulky because they surround the ear. I also like the slightly sound isolation this style provides.

Personally I use the older set of Sony headphones which have this feature. The sound is good (simulated 7.1) but lacking the rumble which I find irritating when I'm trying to focus. I use them on the PS3, Mac, and PC and haven't had any problems. The build quality feels plasticky and cheap but I paid $85 for them, so they were worth the price. http://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Stereo-Headset-Playstation-3/dp/B0053OLY9O/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1354134381&sr=8-3&keywords=ps3+headphones They are $90 on Amazon now and you can find a deal if you look, I would recommend these over the Pulse, Turtle Beach, and Astros if you're budget conscious: wireless, decent sound and battery, and comfortable.

#26 Posted by MonkeyKing1969 (2772 posts) -

I didn't go on a journey, because hundreds of other went before me and tested the waters, so when I walked out my door to the wide world of gaming headset I just went Astro to buy some A40s.

That's it. The advice was clear and the reasons were many. If you go over the facts and remember you buying a gaming rig headset (not Beats by Dr Dre for music) the answer is clear - ASTRO.

The equipment is about as rock solid as you will ever find (Are there defects? Sure, not every headset off the factor floor is perfect...such is life. So, shut up about you third cousin's sister-in-law who got a bad Astro...its not relevant). The Astros works with PS3 and PC out of the box with no fuss...there is a tiny fuss with XB360 because Microsoft was dumb. On the bright side you get 99% of what you need for typical setups in the nice, neat well made box, so there are no worries.

They are $300. That is either make or break for some people, but on the other hand when people ASK what they should buy they know the answer will be painful. If you're the type of person to ask, "What should I get that's good" and the answer is a $300 headset then that is the answer of what is good. In mind Astros are investment, they will last for years and you WILL be able to use then on XB720 and PS4 and you next gaming PC. So, you can view a mix-amp & headset from Astro as an investment that will pay off for years of gaming to come.

#27 Edited by terrible (18 posts) -

@MonkeyKing1969 said:

I didn't go on a journey, because hundreds of other went before me and tested the waters, so when I walked out my door to the wide world of gaming headset I just went Astro to buy some A40s.

That's it. The advice was clear and the reasons were many. If you go over the facts and remember you buying a gaming rig headset (not Beats by Dr Dre for music) the answer is clear - ASTRO.

The equipment is about as rock solid as you will ever find (Are there defects? Sure, not every headset off the factor floor is perfect...such is life. So, shut up about you third cousin's sister-in-law who got a bad Astro...its not relevant). The Astros works with PS3 and PC out of the box with no fuss...there is a tiny fuss with XB360 because Microsoft was dumb. On the bright side you get 99% of what you need for typical setups in the nice, neat well made box, so there are no worries.

They are $300. That is either make or break for some people, but on the other hand when people ASK what they should buy they know the answer will be painful. If you're the type of person to ask, "What should I get that's good" and the answer is a $300 headset then that is the answer of what is good. In mind Astros are investment, they will last for years and you WILL be able to use then on XB720 and PS4 and you next gaming PC. So, you can view a mix-amp & headset from Astro as an investment that will pay off for years of gaming to come.

The actual Astro headset is not that great though. It's good, but it's outclassed by other headphones. The mixamp is the star of the package. Combine that with a superior set of audiophile headphones and clip-on mic for the same price as the A40+mixamp combo and you'll have a great gaming setup and great headphones for music. Astro A40s w/ mixamp is the easiest route probably since you can just order one package and not have to think about anything else but if you're spending that much you might as well get the best sound possible!

Great link for deciding what to buy if you want top quality.

Back to the original question lol. I'd probably get the A30s over the Sony headset. Having the mixamp will give you a ton of wiggle room for the future should you decide to get different headphones.

#28 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

@terrible said:

@MonkeyKing1969 said:

I didn't go on a journey, because hundreds of other went before me and tested the waters, so when I walked out my door to the wide world of gaming headset I just went Astro to buy some A40s.

That's it. The advice was clear and the reasons were many. If you go over the facts and remember you buying a gaming rig headset (not Beats by Dr Dre for music) the answer is clear - ASTRO.

The equipment is about as rock solid as you will ever find (Are there defects? Sure, not every headset off the factor floor is perfect...such is life. So, shut up about you third cousin's sister-in-law who got a bad Astro...its not relevant). The Astros works with PS3 and PC out of the box with no fuss...there is a tiny fuss with XB360 because Microsoft was dumb. On the bright side you get 99% of what you need for typical setups in the nice, neat well made box, so there are no worries.

They are $300. That is either make or break for some people, but on the other hand when people ASK what they should buy they know the answer will be painful. If you're the type of person to ask, "What should I get that's good" and the answer is a $300 headset then that is the answer of what is good. In mind Astros are investment, they will last for years and you WILL be able to use then on XB720 and PS4 and you next gaming PC. So, you can view a mix-amp & headset from Astro as an investment that will pay off for years of gaming to come.

The actual Astro headset is not that great though. It's good, but it's outclassed by other headphones. The mixamp is the star of the package. Combine that with a superior set of audiophile headphones and clip-on mic for the same price as the A40+mixamp combo and you'll have a great gaming setup and great headphones for music. Astro A40s w/ mixamp is the easiest route probably since you can just order one package and not have to think about anything else but if you're spending that much you might as well get the best sound possible!

Great link for deciding what to buy if you want top quality.

Back to the original question lol. I'd probably get the A30s over the Sony headset. Having the mixamp will give you a ton of wiggle room for the future should you decide to get different headphones.

Alright 28 posts later and we have someone answering the original question, and I am beginning to agree even though I will miss the bass impact of the Pulse It's looking like the Astros are a better set also they work with my 360 which is a nice plus

#29 Posted by sarge1445 (676 posts) -

anyone with the Pulse want to weigh in