#1 Posted by SuperB (44 posts) -

A story I read in Meristation magazine online web, today, talk of a new technology developed by the manufacturer Microsoft, which allows monitoring or follow the content visulaización served THROUGH its distribution channel and console. This new technology is known as Content Distribution Regulation by Viewing User, and would be incorporated in consumer devices such as televisions, computers and digital displays connected.

Perhaps the monotorización or track, takes place through the Kinect camera, but has not spoken especificado.Pues that even from a micro installed on a mobile phone, this could be tracking or users visualize quedeseen any audiovisual content.

the idea would be that if two people buy a pass or ticket to see a movie, streaming through the digital distribution channel, only these two people are allowed to enjoy the show or viewing of the film served. If another person enters the room where we are, and to look for the film, we are seeing, the viewing of the film automatically, because we have only acquired the rights for viewing, for two spectators. If the third party is interested in viewing the film with us, we will buy a new license for that person (something like movie tickets or a show, theater, opera or concert, but at home).

Maybe, if the example spreads, incorporate it in the future, Soni and Nintendo in a Play Station and Wii U?

Source: http://www.meristation.com/es/pc/not...visual/1816130

#2 Posted by TheHumanDove (2523 posts) -

There is something incredibly evil about that

#3 Edited by wolf_blitzer85 (5293 posts) -

Aww feck off with that. 

#4 Posted by Ravenlight (8011 posts) -

Looks like Google Translate couldn't save this one.

#5 Posted by PenguinDust (12636 posts) -

@TheHumanDove said:

There is something incredibly evil about that

What he said. First off the idea that a software company would be spying on your movements in your home is bad enough, but then utilizing that ill-gotten information for their own gain is inexcusable. What next, they see me drinking a coke so they'll change the ads on Xbox to Coka-cola related products?

#6 Posted by EXTomar (4951 posts) -

I was saying "Kinect makes much more sense as TV tech than console tech. If there is no one in the room it would be nice if your stuff went to sleep." As long as the monitoring is "close circuit" and only useful for internal functions then there should be no problem doing things depending on how many people are in front of it.

#7 Posted by xaLieNxGrEyx (2605 posts) -

Everybody chill, Microsoft is only patenting this to protect us from Apple actually doing it - and being praised for innovation.

For each step against Apple is a giant step for mankind. May the force be with us all.

#8 Posted by kindone (2833 posts) -

So a magazine speculates on a patent and I'm suppose to believe their non-sense? Don't they realize that companies patent this sort of thing nearly everyday? Not to mention, since when does a movie charge based on the amount of people in the audience? That sort of movement or change would certainly never pass.

#9 Posted by believer258 (12201 posts) -
@xaLieNxGrEyx

Everybody chill, Microsoft is only patenting this to protect us from Apple actually doing it - and being praised for innovation.

For each step against Apple is a giant step for mankind. May the force be with us all.

I'm posting this on an iPhone, well aware that some fucking dweeb could probably know everything on here if he worked in the right spot and knew which switch to flick.
Let's be truthful: Privacy is quickly becoming nothing more than a concept. Are all of these fancy gadgets worth the rape of our privacy?
#10 Posted by Nightriff (5361 posts) -

I really don't think this is possible and what are the chances the charge the dog from entering and exiting the room constantly?

#11 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@Ravenlight said:

Looks like Google Translate couldn't save this one.

Yea, these foreign words are throwing me the eff off. Anybody mind telling me what they mean?

#12 Posted by prestonhedges (1961 posts) -

I'm gonna go on a German forum and just start copy/pasting gibberish bullshit in something that barely resembles German. You know, to engender discussion.

#13 Posted by zoozilla (984 posts) -

For those interested, a more readable story (in English!) is available on Eurogamer.

There is something very, very shady about this - hopefully Microsoft aren't crazy enough to actually go through with it whole-hog.

#14 Posted by Brodehouse (10130 posts) -

Yeah that'll happen. That doesn't break privacy laws in every country that has them. That wouldn't completely fuck up their market.

Honestly you guys act as if companies exist in a Goddamn vacuum and people are incapable of saying no.

#15 Posted by Snail (8662 posts) -

@Brodehouse said:

Yeah that'll happen. That doesn't break privacy laws in every country that has them. That wouldn't completely fuck up their market. Honestly you guys act as if companies exist in a Goddamn vacuum and people are incapable of saying no.

I kinda got flashbacks to when people were flipping shit just because their location was being sent from their phones to Microsoft, Google and Apple. If that made people angry then this would most likely be a complete scandal. So yeah, I'm not so sure this kind of functionality is going to be implemented anytime soon. Not without an off-button anyway.

#16 Posted by RollingZeppelin (2111 posts) -

I think the dividendo.

#17 Posted by YOU_DIED (703 posts) -

@PenguinDust said:

@TheHumanDove said:

There is something incredibly evil about that

What he said. First off the idea that a software company would be spying on your movements in your home is bad enough, but then utilizing that ill-gotten information for their own gain is inexcusable. What next, they see me drinking a coke so they'll change the ads on Xbox to Coka-cola related products?

Or maybe a can of Coke that locks/seals itself when someone other than the person who bought it tries to consume it

#18 Posted by xyzygy (10078 posts) -

This is literally impossible to do without implementing augmentations that distort reality or druggings.

It's kind of like saying "No, you're not allowed letting your friends borrow your video games because it's a form of piracy."

#19 Posted by Plasticstars (171 posts) -

That's fucked up, yo'.

#20 Posted by Timnoldzim (86 posts) -

@xyzygy said:

This is literally impossible to do without implementing augmentations that distort reality or druggings.

It's kind of like saying "No, you're not allowed letting your friends borrow your video games because it's a form of piracy."

That's what most publishers seem to be saying, though!

#21 Posted by xyzygy (10078 posts) -

@Timnoldzim said:

@xyzygy said:

This is literally impossible to do without implementing augmentations that distort reality or druggings.

It's kind of like saying "No, you're not allowed letting your friends borrow your video games because it's a form of piracy."

That's what most publishers seem to be saying, though!

Really? There are people actually saying this?

#22 Posted by believer258 (12201 posts) -

@zoozilla said:

For those interested, a more readable story (in English!) is available on Eurogamer.

There is something very, very shady about this - hopefully Microsoft aren't crazy enough to actually go through with it whole-hog.

OK, just skimming that article, that sounds fucking stupid. I'm not buying a Kinect, and even if somehow I do end up with one, what's stopping me from not plugging it in when I watch movies? Oh, I can't start movies without it in? Hello, DVD player!

#23 Posted by WickedFather (1733 posts) -

I will point my Kinnect (I don't have one) at a diorama of me and my foxy bitch and get the local football team to come around and watch teh fillm. Oh, this won't happen because everyone is going PS4 and PC for the next gen.

#24 Posted by WarlordPayne (706 posts) -

@xyzygy said:

@Timnoldzim said:

@xyzygy said:

This is literally impossible to do without implementing augmentations that distort reality or druggings.

It's kind of like saying "No, you're not allowed letting your friends borrow your video games because it's a form of piracy."

That's what most publishers seem to be saying, though!

Really? There are people actually saying this?

I have CDs that say that.

#25 Posted by Timnoldzim (86 posts) -

@xyzygy said:

@Timnoldzim said:

@xyzygy said:

This is literally impossible to do without implementing augmentations that distort reality or druggings.

It's kind of like saying "No, you're not allowed letting your friends borrow your video games because it's a form of piracy."

That's what most publishers seem to be saying, though!

Really? There are people actually saying this?

They're saying things that are awfully similar. Publishers are trying to screw over anyone and everyone who doesn't play on a brand-new copy that belongs to themselves. Online passes, DRM...