#1 Posted by PlipO (141 posts) -

Consider this, when we play games, we go through a lot of different emotions and expel a lot of mental energy.

Just imagine the status gamers might be elevated to if we were able to get well paid for playing games. Not by people watching us and not by being good at playing games.

Our earning potential would be judged purely on the emotions we go through whilst combating digital evils and obstacles.

Chiefly, the intensity of the emotions we experience whilst playing games.

I do believe this is a possible, in future years I foresee games being hooked up to the internet and transmitting their

emotions to people who want to experience what highly strung gamers go though.

Gamers’ emotions might be used a socially accepted recreational drug because the recipients would be completely

aware of its source.

Why could not gamers’ emotions be used to aid those suffering from depression?

If one is feeling down, why not choose to be connected to someone who is experiencing a sea of emotions.

This might provoke some trigger within the depressed person and therefore help lift the malaise from the afflicted person.

#2 Edited by PolyesterKyle (137 posts) -

Holy shit, this is sort of wacky, but I really dig it.

Edit: Upon further thought, as a person who is depressed and rarely experiences several aspects of the emotional spectrum, playing video games is really awesome for the reasons you mentioned. If I can get invested in a story and care about characters in a way that actual life would never let me (not me being pessimistic, just pointing out the totally fantastical qualities of video games in general), then that's a really good thing and it makes me feel, for lack of a better word, good. Or if I can get invested in a video game that requires time and effort to improve at it, then that's also good, like it sucks when you lose after a 30 minute game of Galaga, and you end up swearing your ass off over every little mistake, but that's also therapeutic in a way or cathartic at least. And then after weeks of trying you finally beat your high score and you're on top of the god damned world, maybe I'm crazy, I don't know, but I think you've got a point or something duder.

#3 Posted by Blu3V3nom07 (4187 posts) -

That's pretty deep there.. I mean, I agree.

#4 Posted by redelectric (158 posts) -

Depression is chemical. Even when I'm happy it's still there. In fact, happiness sometimes makes it worse. Nice idea, but not how depression works.

#5 Posted by Canteu (2821 posts) -

That's not how depression works.

#6 Posted by PlipO (141 posts) -

@redelectric: It is completely simplistic the way I present it, however people with sustained low mood and depression are often prescribed activities with the aim of mentally stimulating that person. Could a gamers' emotions used to be mentally stimulate someone else?

#7 Posted by FUMN (84 posts) -

what if bears weren't large and dangerous creatures, but instead big and furry gateways to mauls-ville?

This is flowery talk saying nothing.

#8 Edited by redelectric (158 posts) -

@plipo: It's not mental stimulation so much as actually changing a person's brain chemistry. Exercise releases endorphins which helps to balance dopamine levels. Same with reading a good book or playing a great game. It's not emotions which are the issue with clinically depressed people, but chemistry. Our bodies...well they kinda hate us.

Now, for someone feeling down with better brain chemistry, this would be kinda a cool supplement, I think, albeit perhaps a little voyeuristic.

#10 Posted by PlipO (141 posts) -

I had a selfish motive for posting the original assertion. I have for many years suffered from low mood, I refuse to call it depression because I do not want to associated with that label. Since my early teenage years I have often gone days on end – feeling very low, often withdrawn from my family and the wider world. I usually found a lot of comfort in computer games. I would use them to lose myself, meaning I did not have to confront whatever was causing me to feel down and conflicted. Most people saw me as an introvert and this was a correct assessment of my then personality. Even though at the same time whist preferring to hide away from the world, I did enjoy sports and do well at most sports I tried. One year, I won the long jump competition in my school, I was good at football and one of the best Tennis players in my school. Academically, I did well but still these achievements were not sufficient to shake my mood. The point I am attempting to make is that for many years I have used computer games to hide away from my issues, I believe I have even on occasions used them to work through some issues.

Therefore it is only natural that I suspect that gamers' experiences might help those feeling low. Of course this speculation. I do not have the medical training to make a comprehensive argument. I am basing my assertions on my experiences. If we had access to a sophisticated tech setup as I presume would be needed to put my half baked theory to the test – would it be so fantastical to examine the hypothesis that second had emotions might help the recipient to deal with emotional problems?

#12 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@plipo said:

I do believe this is a possible, in future years I foresee games being hooked up to the internet and transmitting their

emotions to people who want to experience what highly strung gamers go though.

Isn't this a few steps removed from Glass Cage?

#13 Posted by Optix12 (611 posts) -

unrelated to helping with emotional problems but if I could I would totally use this system on a NA'VI player playing the whole of that last International 3 match

#14 Posted by TheHT (11099 posts) -

Nope. I ain't directly hooking myself up to an experience machine. That's my line.

#15 Posted by TheManWithNoPlan (5373 posts) -

This kind of sounds like a movie I came across once. It involved people taking a drug that allowed them to experience pain, due to mankind having expelled it from the human body.

Other than that, this kind of route could make for some really interesting vicarious/ voyeuristic experiences. If you know what I mean...

#16 Posted by PlipO (141 posts) -

@video_game_king: I just watched the YT video, I like the idea of everyone being able to communicate with each other by some means of telepathy. I would want the ability to voluntarily block anyones attempt to communicate with me without suffering any ill effects. If we die a peaceful death in the process of attempting this - well at least some future generations would be able to use the research to perfect the process. Sounds like a noble cause to die for.

#17 Posted by audioBusting (1493 posts) -

You mean if we can transfer emotions, like in Ni No Kuni? If that is possible, I doubt that video games would be the only source for it. Either way, it would probably only last until something like a total mind transfer can be done.

#18 Edited by TyCobb (1961 posts) -

Brian Griffin: Can I buy some pot from you?

#19 Edited by PlipO (141 posts) -

You mean if we can transfer emotions, like in Ni No Kuni? If that is possible, I doubt that video games would be the only source for it. Either way, it would probably only last until something like a total mind transfer can be done.

A simply way of putting it is - when a gamer is playing a game, he/she can allow others to experience the emotions that they are going through. These recipients would naturally be going through their own emotions. As to what would happen as a result of someone having to deal with this amount of intense brain activity - I do not know. but if this was to become reality, I expect there would be a myriad of checks and balances to be satisfied before this recreational venture becomes legal.

#20 Edited by Sploder (917 posts) -

#21 Posted by PlipO (141 posts) -

@sploder: I suspect you are attempting to compare me to Peter Molyneux, if so - you are mistaken. Peter Molyneux is a very good games designer and producer. Although I have many ideas for games, I have contributed to the production of no game... so far. We are members of an irreverent and independently minded games forum, we should be airing less considered and abstract views on the future of games use and development. I will not say I am flattered that you chose to post a photo of Mr Molyneux within my thread, I simply do not deserve this comparison, few people have displayed the imagination and drive to realize games concept as Mr Molyneux has done through out his illustrious career. If I can one day achieve a tenth of what Peter Molyneux has accomplished so far, I will be very pleased.

#22 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@plipo said:

If we die a peaceful death in the process of attempting this - well at least some future generations would be able to use the research to perfect the process. Sounds like a noble cause to die for.

That's the main conflict in the third arc!

#23 Edited by BBAlpert (1429 posts) -

@plipo said:

If we die a peaceful death in the process of attempting this - well at least some future generations would be able to use the research to perfect the process. Sounds like a noble cause to die for.

That's the main conflict in the third arc!

Wasn't there something like this in Brave New World? It's been a while since I read that book, but if memory serves, it didn't take long before "feel the pride of a mountain climber reaching the summit" and "experience the tension of a cop in a high speed car chase" wasn't enough, and escalated to "how awesome would a delicatessen smell if you were a dog?!" and "fuck it, let's hook a baby up to this brain recording thing to see what that's like!"

I'm probably conflating this with elements of The Giver and some other things in there as well, though.

#24 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@bbalpert:

I haven't read Aldous Huxley ever, so I can't say for certain. I have read The Giver, though, and I'm pretty sure the concepts there are different. It's not like the people in Fragile Dreams are denied emotions; it's just that they're waking up to a latent ability, and then they die in the process.

#25 Posted by I_Stay_Puft (3158 posts) -

Feels like Matrix talk to me.

#26 Posted by enemymouse (332 posts) -

Doctors already sort of do this, but instead of live subjects they use chemicals to convince the brain to control emotions that are causing trouble in patients. These are meant to be long term treatments and can have nasty side effects as we all know.

If emotions could be harnessed from a live subject of any kind, recorded and pumped into the brain of another person on demand, we'd have a great short term treatment for emotional trouble; the emotional equivalent of an asthma inhaler.

However, the black market would contain the worst imaginable emotions; the results of the worst acts of human-kind. Its mere existence would probably contribute to a global depression and the end of civilization.

Cool idea though.