Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -

Hey, remember this???? No?.. Well, fuck it, It's back in all its amateurish ( especially highlight by each blog's altered title ) and uncreative ( another blog about games that some douche played - wonderful! ) glory! I was planning on basing my third edition on a couple of PS1 classics - most notably Vagrant Story and Abe's Oddysee, but as it turns out... those games haven't aged all too well, as is the way with most PS1 games when taking your first step, instead of stepping back in. In any case there were still plenty of candidates, but generalised laziness halted me back. I've been meaning to get back into at least posting one more recently because of all of the PS2 games I've been getting into. And, well, here we are! Or at least where I are. Is this thing on?!
Also should note no custom made banners on this corner of the blogosphere since I'm virtually talentless in... everything... so it's all left to whatever GB's text editor can give me... don't forget your coats!


Shadow of Rome For The PS2




      You know this guy's to be feared for the obvious element of shamelessness and seriousness to walk around with the end of a broom on the top of his head



 ''No, that is not Solid Snake!''
Why it took so long? - Actually this is one that I've already played, a lot, way when it was seen as one of the best looking games to find on consoles. I took a gamble with it since during that time the idea of video games journalism was pretty foreign to me, with reviews and the like, and I mostly based my purchases off the trailers shown on TV. Yup, I was one of those gamers. In any case I got this solely for it being a CAPCOM game - and back then CAPCOM were the Gods of gaming and one of the few developers that I bothered to remember the name of. I freakin' loved it and it nestled nicely as one of my all time favourite games on the PS2. Unfortunately I lost it during the time between then and now, and my love for this game forced me to virtually trek to a copy, and one did I trek! For about £4 at that.



What I thought - 6-7 years later, and it still stands! Shadow of Rome was well known for, at its time, the rather unique concept of basing its story and gameplay around the Gladiatorial games of Roman History. Gladiator buzz had certainly died down by that time, after a recent resurface with 2000's Gladiator, but still proved to be an excellent take. It made great use of the themes with a fairly slow paced, gore filled combat resume neatly woven around a not-very-authentic-but-still-entertaining take on the assassination of Julius Caesar. There were parts that featured a more linear focused brawler design, but the majority of the game had you playing out a small variety of Gladiator modes, ranging from simple death-matches, saving damsels, to single handedly assaulting small Fortresses, that pretty much always resulted in limbs soaring through the sky. A handsome selection of weapons, all with their own weight and undeniable feeling of power made Shadow of Rome's combat one to remember.

 Well now,
The game also featured some stealth sections too, where you then switched from Agrippa (the fighter of the two) to Octavianus, who also looked suspiciously a lot like a certain other wall shimmying, wall tapping stealth protagonist. They were very mid-2000s esque stealth sections as well, with terrible AI tropes that while unrealistic, were still the most plausible way to make the stealth bearable. You could don disguises to traverse through areas Octavianus would otherwise not be to allowed to traverse, but the strict rules for this kind of play were insane, but also, again, expected for the time. Running was considered suspicious and even picking up a piece of fruit was enough for one of the eagle eyed chamber maids to spot through your fascade and realise you're a cold blooded Hitman!.. Or at least a vicious, murderous robber of fruit. The fact that you're also a guy with a hair-cut out of Final Fantasy walking around in suits of armour that are so clearly 10 sizes too big for him, however, never made anyone blink.  

 doesn't this particular CAPCOM duo look familiar?
The stealth sections mostly acted as segways for the story, and a little break from the combat. They didn't last all too long fortunately, and they weren't all that difficult besides the final few. Even still, playing through it then (and naturally all the more now) all I wanted to do was get back into the action of whacking someone to death with their own arm. The story that ties it all together was also surprisingly well told, with a pretty strong cast of serviceable voice actors - including Scott Menville performing with what appears to be the only voice he can muster, and a Senator who looks like he was facially modeled after Anthony Hopkins (though was voiced Peter Reneday). It's a huge conspiracy story, with pretty predictable twists, but non the less an entertainingly silly affair that gives you more motivation to cut off limps than to simply enjoy cutting off limbs.

The soundtrack is also phenomenal, and one of my favourites from the entire CAPCOM library. It had a subtle mix of JRPG-ish tunes, with the grandiose feeling of awe that historically themed orchestral songs so often leave you with. Marvelous *re-positions monocle*



Will I play through it again? - I've already completed it a few times now, though it's one of those games that I'll enjoy heading back to after so long, just because it's that special and immensely fun to play through. It's aged surprisingly well, with some crisp graphics, brilliant facial animations and intense gameplay. It's rather clunky, though, which'll no doubt keep people from taking advantage of such an underrated gem as this, but for people who are accustomed to the traditional clunkiness of CAPCOM's games of old(ish) enjoys hammy handed voice acting (another CAPCOM tradition) with some memorably OTT hack n slash, and haven't played Shadow of Rome, I fully recommend you give it a look! Not much to lose for the price it can be found at these days, no doubt.

Also Centurion Gorilla Gladiators.

  
  


Metal Gear Solid: Special Missions AKA Mission Failed - The Game! For The PS1




 Ninja facepalm!



Why it took so long? - Actually, this is another that I played the oozing shit out of when it was new.. yes, I know, this entire blog series has lost all consistency! 

BUT!! And that's an all-capitalised but:

Like Shadow of Rome before it I lost this through the years of house moving, bedroom switching, and the nightmarish manner of a disorganised teen. I decided that I wanted it once more within my possession, though, just for me considering it a fairly rare title - whether anyone disagrees or not! I need my niche dammit! - and alongside the original Metal Gear Solid, played a focal point of my childhood era of gaming. So I got it! £8's worth of got to be exact, which is pretty unfair when put against Shadow of Rome for half that price, but c'est vie. 



What I thought -  It's a PS1 game, so naturally the game wasn't as rough around the edges as it's like brushing against the inside of an iron maiden. It's virtually (quite literally in a sense) an expansion pack to the original 1998's Metal Gear Solid. Speaking for that alone the game is tough to get into even for newcomers, never mind people who used to fap at the graphics, back when faces that looked like they were drawn on with a pencil where the epitome of production values. But yeeah, the graphics aren't an issue really. They have themselves a interestingly vintage look, and I at least have always been a fan of the blocky Minecraftion characters ( kinda paradox-ic to call PS1 graphics Minecrafty, instead of the other way round I know ) of the PS1 in games such as this. 

So Special Missions is simply a huge bundle of VR missions - much like the VR missions more people will remember in MGS2: Substance, or even the few in the original Metal Gear Solid too. There's no story ( though this entry does creatively factor into things down the line ) and is made up of you playing as Snake, more as an avatar than a character, going through an ensemble of cleverly designed trials within numerous categories. You'll begin with the staple sneaking missions, which pull you through 15 levels of increasingly complex arenas, trying to get from one point to the next while avoiding the Genome ( winter variety, oddly enough ) soldiers. Eventually you'll unlock Weapon levels, which instead ask of you to kill all enemies you encounter, sometimes without being seen. As you scale through the percentage meter of what the game has to offer, though, it starts introducing weirder and weirder levels. You'll find yourself facing off against Godzilla parodies in the form of gigantic Genome soldiers; you'll be knocking down guards into pits one after another like they were domino's; you'll shooting down UFO's; you'll be solving murders and, eventually, you'll be roaming around as Grayfox himself with the goal of assassinating Solid Snake who actually joined the Genome Soldiers.

  
  

Like I said... weird. But under a more positive light: inventive. They were what made Special Missions for me so memorable and downright gob-smacking. Kojima's blatant sense of kooky humour was being shown to a new generation of masses through Special Missions, and in general remains as one of my favourite Metal Gear Solids, oddly enough. It's all brilliant in concept, but put against the test of time implicates a significant drop for the enjoyment.

 Pretty much as awesome as it looks
Resident Evil ( as a franchise, more than a single game I know, but still a relevant compari-OH FUCK YOU! ) had its controversial limit of 'no walking while shooting', and Metal Gear Solid had a plain and simple 'no walking' restriction. As such it made sneaking about pretty darn cumbersome, and since the entire world was put on high alert just the by the mere sight of Snake, it made the accidental ''one step too close'' occurrence when trying to hug someone by the neck far too common. It was pretty infuriating in Metal Gear Solid, and when put within a handful of Virtual Reality missions, most of which fail should Snake be spotted, asks for a high degree of patience as the number one requirement. The game also does feature a first person view, but only for.. observational purposes - such as taking pictures of a SUPER HAWT PS1 QUALITY MEI LING, YUM! You can't use the FP view to help better line up a shot with your weapon, and the persistent isometric view allows for a significantly skewed amount of aiming freedom. That then bleeds into a lot of the Weapon missions when you required a great deal of accuracy, and the grenade missions in particular benefited the most to prove how dated the gameplay has become. 

Fortunately, the more creative missions manage to stay fresh thanks to its quirky aesthetic of literally leaving you with nothing to predict just WTF is coming up next. Or at least it would if I hadn't spoiled what to expect in the previous paragraph. Non the less, Special Missions is a game I'm glad to have on my shelf once again, and for what it helped me relive, I'm grateful for.

Should be noted that this also requires a copy of the original MGS as well to play. Everytime you want to play Special Missions, you have to put in the MGS disc. Plus it doesn't work on a PS3 either so.... PATIENCE!


Will I play through it again? - I've downed my last Genola for a good long while I think.



The Red Star For The PS2




Wonder how popular this is on Gamebomb.ru




Why it took so long? - NO, this is not another that I'm more so reliving the memories with. This entry right here is a gawd dayum, bona fide, true as tinsel first timer for me. WE'RE BACK ON TRACK! Or rather I'm back on the right track.. or maybe now I've opted for the wrong track?? Or m-

I only recently heard about this through a tweet by VinceNotVance, appreciatively enough, who I think was complimenting the PSP release. I didn't have a PSP, so I opted for the PS2 version instead and we lived happy ever after.



What I thought - It's really rather good, taking cues from a lot of the Arcade days of top down shootin, side scrollin beat-em-ups, but in 3D, and in the same game! Generally the game plays along as a pretty satisfying action/adventure, almost akin to something like DMC, with some intuitive combos to unleash through a blend of melee and ranged weapons. The neat trick is how sometimes it'll revert from the side scrolling action to a top down shooter, which is usually the calling card for one of the dozen upon dozens of mid-game boss battles that you'll encounter. The boss battles also then initiate a kind of Bullet Hell scenario with sometimes of up to hundreds of shiny, futuristic bullets completely covering the entire screen.

 It's not quite at the complexity of Portal 2; but, y'know.. team work is still appreciated.
The problem is is how firmly the Arcading style of the game sticks. There's little of a story ( though I'm to believe this is based on a pretty story heavy manga ) with each mission giving you a briefing from a guy who has the single portrait of looking like he dropped a hammer on his little toe--that or he watched the evil Ring tape--and gives strikingly little detail on just what the F is going on. Russians, anime, evil robots and bullets... lots and lots of bullets. That's pretty much all I got.

It has two initial characters, with an unlockable third, and they all have their own distinctive playing style that's enough to differentiate the characters when playing as one over another besides their obvious cosmetic differences. Cooperative play is also in full effect, and comes with the usual fun and frustration depending who you decide to coop with. Speaking for an ideal partnership, the games works perfectly with a fellow/fellowess at your side and makes the otherwise shallow template much easier to ignore. The difficulty is neatly balanced as well, giving you a real breeze through the first couple of stages, but naturally ratchets up the enemies ( to which there was a surprising variety of ). Fortunately, there are upgrades to attain via your accumulated points from completion of the stages, but it's more related to you trying to keep up with the enemy, rather than attempting to RPG your character into an unstoppable juggernaut.



Will I play through it again? - More than likely. So far I've only completed it as the one character, and the gameplay's arcadey charm still contains that addictive nature of heading back in just to add a few extra numbers on to your own Leaderboard. And even if I don't, for a fiver this gave me a pretty lil bundle of play-time and one I'd recommend to most, if they haven't already shelled for the PSP version.


And that's that. Felt good to actually put some effort towards a blog again, AND YOU CAN TOO! Now I leave you with this track from Yakuza 4 to which is still, since the games release, festering within the inner reaches of whatever part of the brain memories are stored. Just because the more videos and pictures the more chance you won't piss this off to watch that QL Giantbomb just pos-FUCK!

  
#1 Edited by Yummylee (22066 posts) -

Hey, remember this???? No?.. Well, fuck it, It's back in all its amateurish ( especially highlight by each blog's altered title ) and uncreative ( another blog about games that some douche played - wonderful! ) glory! I was planning on basing my third edition on a couple of PS1 classics - most notably Vagrant Story and Abe's Oddysee, but as it turns out... those games haven't aged all too well, as is the way with most PS1 games when taking your first step, instead of stepping back in. In any case there were still plenty of candidates, but generalised laziness halted me back. I've been meaning to get back into at least posting one more recently because of all of the PS2 games I've been getting into. And, well, here we are! Or at least where I are. Is this thing on?!
Also should note no custom made banners on this corner of the blogosphere since I'm virtually talentless in... everything... so it's all left to whatever GB's text editor can give me... don't forget your coats!


Shadow of Rome For The PS2




      You know this guy's to be feared for the obvious element of shamelessness and seriousness to walk around with the end of a broom on the top of his head



 ''No, that is not Solid Snake!''
Why it took so long? - Actually this is one that I've already played, a lot, way when it was seen as one of the best looking games to find on consoles. I took a gamble with it since during that time the idea of video games journalism was pretty foreign to me, with reviews and the like, and I mostly based my purchases off the trailers shown on TV. Yup, I was one of those gamers. In any case I got this solely for it being a CAPCOM game - and back then CAPCOM were the Gods of gaming and one of the few developers that I bothered to remember the name of. I freakin' loved it and it nestled nicely as one of my all time favourite games on the PS2. Unfortunately I lost it during the time between then and now, and my love for this game forced me to virtually trek to a copy, and one did I trek! For about £4 at that.



What I thought - 6-7 years later, and it still stands! Shadow of Rome was well known for, at its time, the rather unique concept of basing its story and gameplay around the Gladiatorial games of Roman History. Gladiator buzz had certainly died down by that time, after a recent resurface with 2000's Gladiator, but still proved to be an excellent take. It made great use of the themes with a fairly slow paced, gore filled combat resume neatly woven around a not-very-authentic-but-still-entertaining take on the assassination of Julius Caesar. There were parts that featured a more linear focused brawler design, but the majority of the game had you playing out a small variety of Gladiator modes, ranging from simple death-matches, saving damsels, to single handedly assaulting small Fortresses, that pretty much always resulted in limbs soaring through the sky. A handsome selection of weapons, all with their own weight and undeniable feeling of power made Shadow of Rome's combat one to remember.

 Well now,
The game also featured some stealth sections too, where you then switched from Agrippa (the fighter of the two) to Octavianus, who also looked suspiciously a lot like a certain other wall shimmying, wall tapping stealth protagonist. They were very mid-2000s esque stealth sections as well, with terrible AI tropes that while unrealistic, were still the most plausible way to make the stealth bearable. You could don disguises to traverse through areas Octavianus would otherwise not be to allowed to traverse, but the strict rules for this kind of play were insane, but also, again, expected for the time. Running was considered suspicious and even picking up a piece of fruit was enough for one of the eagle eyed chamber maids to spot through your fascade and realise you're a cold blooded Hitman!.. Or at least a vicious, murderous robber of fruit. The fact that you're also a guy with a hair-cut out of Final Fantasy walking around in suits of armour that are so clearly 10 sizes too big for him, however, never made anyone blink.  

 doesn't this particular CAPCOM duo look familiar?
The stealth sections mostly acted as segways for the story, and a little break from the combat. They didn't last all too long fortunately, and they weren't all that difficult besides the final few. Even still, playing through it then (and naturally all the more now) all I wanted to do was get back into the action of whacking someone to death with their own arm. The story that ties it all together was also surprisingly well told, with a pretty strong cast of serviceable voice actors - including Scott Menville performing with what appears to be the only voice he can muster, and a Senator who looks like he was facially modeled after Anthony Hopkins (though was voiced Peter Reneday). It's a huge conspiracy story, with pretty predictable twists, but non the less an entertainingly silly affair that gives you more motivation to cut off limps than to simply enjoy cutting off limbs.

The soundtrack is also phenomenal, and one of my favourites from the entire CAPCOM library. It had a subtle mix of JRPG-ish tunes, with the grandiose feeling of awe that historically themed orchestral songs so often leave you with. Marvelous *re-positions monocle*



Will I play through it again? - I've already completed it a few times now, though it's one of those games that I'll enjoy heading back to after so long, just because it's that special and immensely fun to play through. It's aged surprisingly well, with some crisp graphics, brilliant facial animations and intense gameplay. It's rather clunky, though, which'll no doubt keep people from taking advantage of such an underrated gem as this, but for people who are accustomed to the traditional clunkiness of CAPCOM's games of old(ish) enjoys hammy handed voice acting (another CAPCOM tradition) with some memorably OTT hack n slash, and haven't played Shadow of Rome, I fully recommend you give it a look! Not much to lose for the price it can be found at these days, no doubt.

Also Centurion Gorilla Gladiators.

  
  


Metal Gear Solid: Special Missions AKA Mission Failed - The Game! For The PS1




 Ninja facepalm!



Why it took so long? - Actually, this is another that I played the oozing shit out of when it was new.. yes, I know, this entire blog series has lost all consistency! 

BUT!! And that's an all-capitalised but:

Like Shadow of Rome before it I lost this through the years of house moving, bedroom switching, and the nightmarish manner of a disorganised teen. I decided that I wanted it once more within my possession, though, just for me considering it a fairly rare title - whether anyone disagrees or not! I need my niche dammit! - and alongside the original Metal Gear Solid, played a focal point of my childhood era of gaming. So I got it! £8's worth of got to be exact, which is pretty unfair when put against Shadow of Rome for half that price, but c'est vie. 



What I thought -  It's a PS1 game, so naturally the game wasn't as rough around the edges as it's like brushing against the inside of an iron maiden. It's virtually (quite literally in a sense) an expansion pack to the original 1998's Metal Gear Solid. Speaking for that alone the game is tough to get into even for newcomers, never mind people who used to fap at the graphics, back when faces that looked like they were drawn on with a pencil where the epitome of production values. But yeeah, the graphics aren't an issue really. They have themselves a interestingly vintage look, and I at least have always been a fan of the blocky Minecraftion characters ( kinda paradox-ic to call PS1 graphics Minecrafty, instead of the other way round I know ) of the PS1 in games such as this. 

So Special Missions is simply a huge bundle of VR missions - much like the VR missions more people will remember in MGS2: Substance, or even the few in the original Metal Gear Solid too. There's no story ( though this entry does creatively factor into things down the line ) and is made up of you playing as Snake, more as an avatar than a character, going through an ensemble of cleverly designed trials within numerous categories. You'll begin with the staple sneaking missions, which pull you through 15 levels of increasingly complex arenas, trying to get from one point to the next while avoiding the Genome ( winter variety, oddly enough ) soldiers. Eventually you'll unlock Weapon levels, which instead ask of you to kill all enemies you encounter, sometimes without being seen. As you scale through the percentage meter of what the game has to offer, though, it starts introducing weirder and weirder levels. You'll find yourself facing off against Godzilla parodies in the form of gigantic Genome soldiers; you'll be knocking down guards into pits one after another like they were domino's; you'll shooting down UFO's; you'll be solving murders and, eventually, you'll be roaming around as Grayfox himself with the goal of assassinating Solid Snake who actually joined the Genome Soldiers.

  
  

Like I said... weird. But under a more positive light: inventive. They were what made Special Missions for me so memorable and downright gob-smacking. Kojima's blatant sense of kooky humour was being shown to a new generation of masses through Special Missions, and in general remains as one of my favourite Metal Gear Solids, oddly enough. It's all brilliant in concept, but put against the test of time implicates a significant drop for the enjoyment.

 Pretty much as awesome as it looks
Resident Evil ( as a franchise, more than a single game I know, but still a relevant compari-OH FUCK YOU! ) had its controversial limit of 'no walking while shooting', and Metal Gear Solid had a plain and simple 'no walking' restriction. As such it made sneaking about pretty darn cumbersome, and since the entire world was put on high alert just the by the mere sight of Snake, it made the accidental ''one step too close'' occurrence when trying to hug someone by the neck far too common. It was pretty infuriating in Metal Gear Solid, and when put within a handful of Virtual Reality missions, most of which fail should Snake be spotted, asks for a high degree of patience as the number one requirement. The game also does feature a first person view, but only for.. observational purposes - such as taking pictures of a SUPER HAWT PS1 QUALITY MEI LING, YUM! You can't use the FP view to help better line up a shot with your weapon, and the persistent isometric view allows for a significantly skewed amount of aiming freedom. That then bleeds into a lot of the Weapon missions when you required a great deal of accuracy, and the grenade missions in particular benefited the most to prove how dated the gameplay has become. 

Fortunately, the more creative missions manage to stay fresh thanks to its quirky aesthetic of literally leaving you with nothing to predict just WTF is coming up next. Or at least it would if I hadn't spoiled what to expect in the previous paragraph. Non the less, Special Missions is a game I'm glad to have on my shelf once again, and for what it helped me relive, I'm grateful for.

Should be noted that this also requires a copy of the original MGS as well to play. Everytime you want to play Special Missions, you have to put in the MGS disc. Plus it doesn't work on a PS3 either so.... PATIENCE!


Will I play through it again? - I've downed my last Genola for a good long while I think.



The Red Star For The PS2




Wonder how popular this is on Gamebomb.ru




Why it took so long? - NO, this is not another that I'm more so reliving the memories with. This entry right here is a gawd dayum, bona fide, true as tinsel first timer for me. WE'RE BACK ON TRACK! Or rather I'm back on the right track.. or maybe now I've opted for the wrong track?? Or m-

I only recently heard about this through a tweet by VinceNotVance, appreciatively enough, who I think was complimenting the PSP release. I didn't have a PSP, so I opted for the PS2 version instead and we lived happy ever after.



What I thought - It's really rather good, taking cues from a lot of the Arcade days of top down shootin, side scrollin beat-em-ups, but in 3D, and in the same game! Generally the game plays along as a pretty satisfying action/adventure, almost akin to something like DMC, with some intuitive combos to unleash through a blend of melee and ranged weapons. The neat trick is how sometimes it'll revert from the side scrolling action to a top down shooter, which is usually the calling card for one of the dozen upon dozens of mid-game boss battles that you'll encounter. The boss battles also then initiate a kind of Bullet Hell scenario with sometimes of up to hundreds of shiny, futuristic bullets completely covering the entire screen.

 It's not quite at the complexity of Portal 2; but, y'know.. team work is still appreciated.
The problem is is how firmly the Arcading style of the game sticks. There's little of a story ( though I'm to believe this is based on a pretty story heavy manga ) with each mission giving you a briefing from a guy who has the single portrait of looking like he dropped a hammer on his little toe--that or he watched the evil Ring tape--and gives strikingly little detail on just what the F is going on. Russians, anime, evil robots and bullets... lots and lots of bullets. That's pretty much all I got.

It has two initial characters, with an unlockable third, and they all have their own distinctive playing style that's enough to differentiate the characters when playing as one over another besides their obvious cosmetic differences. Cooperative play is also in full effect, and comes with the usual fun and frustration depending who you decide to coop with. Speaking for an ideal partnership, the games works perfectly with a fellow/fellowess at your side and makes the otherwise shallow template much easier to ignore. The difficulty is neatly balanced as well, giving you a real breeze through the first couple of stages, but naturally ratchets up the enemies ( to which there was a surprising variety of ). Fortunately, there are upgrades to attain via your accumulated points from completion of the stages, but it's more related to you trying to keep up with the enemy, rather than attempting to RPG your character into an unstoppable juggernaut.



Will I play through it again? - More than likely. So far I've only completed it as the one character, and the gameplay's arcadey charm still contains that addictive nature of heading back in just to add a few extra numbers on to your own Leaderboard. And even if I don't, for a fiver this gave me a pretty lil bundle of play-time and one I'd recommend to most, if they haven't already shelled for the PSP version.


And that's that. Felt good to actually put some effort towards a blog again, AND YOU CAN TOO! Now I leave you with this track from Yakuza 4 to which is still, since the games release, festering within the inner reaches of whatever part of the brain memories are stored. Just because the more videos and pictures the more chance you won't piss this off to watch that QL Giantbomb just pos-FUCK!

  
#2 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

Wait, Abe's Oddysee hasn't aged well? I still find it to be a pretty cool game. Same for Vagrant Story, even though I haven't touched it in a long time.

#3 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:
" Wait, Abe's Oddysee hasn't aged well? I still find it to be a pretty cool game. Same for Vagrant Story, even though I haven't touched it in a long time. "
I suppose it's a bit harsh towards Abe, I agree, though I found it difficult to carry on; possibly more so for my lack of interest with the world and the story. I remember enjoying it a lot more when a fart button was hilarious to me ;P

Vagrant Story, though. Fuuuck, man, I just can get behind that. Circle as the action button, grungy brown environments, using the shoulder buttons to control the camera? It's a lot less forgiving since it's a game I never had the pleasure of playing when it was brand new. 
#4 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Abyssfull:

Only one of your Vagrant Story complaints makes sense.
#5 Posted by Yanngc33 (4496 posts) -

I don't like this hate towards the french.

Shadow of Rome, hell of a game
#6 Posted by Underachiever007 (2468 posts) -

A French phrase and a Yakuza 4 track? I give this blog 5 class stars.

#7 Edited by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:

" @Abyssfull: Only one of your Vagrant Story complaints makes sense. "

...What's not to understand? The controls are severely dated and tough to work around, the environments are drab and repetitive, and the combat is also mind-numbingly monotonous. 

@Yanngc33 said:
" I don't like this hate towards the french.
Shadow of Rome, hell of a game
"
It's hate against people who aren't French using French phrase, not the French themselves <3
#8 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Abyssfull:

I'm talking about your two control things. Circle was actually pretty common as confirm in Japan, so buying a Japanese game back then was like an agreement to press Circle instead of X. As for the camera controls, what sucks about the L buttons as camera controls? I'm sure I've seen that in a lot of games. Hell, that's how it works in Dragon Quest VI, along with many other DS games.
#9 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: I'm talking about your two control things. Circle was actually pretty common as confirm in Japan, so buying a Japanese game back then was like an agreement to press Circle instead of X. As for the camera controls, what sucks about the L buttons as camera controls? I'm sure I've seen that in a lot of games. Hell, that's how it works in Dragon Quest VI, along with many other DS games. "
Yeah, I know that was a common design for games back then but it doesn't make it any less of a hassle to work with, with me constantly cancelling out of menus ect. with the X button. It's the same with Metal Gear Solid: Special Missions. And using the shoulder buttons to control the camera is just awful and was far too slow in Vagrant Story at that. I hated it then and I hate it all the more now. It may still be used in DS games, but that doesn't make it any less out of date.
#10 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Abyssfull:

How does it seem out of date? If anything, it seems intuitive to press the left shoulder button to rotate the camera left. Have you any better suggestions? I can't think of many.
#11 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: How does it seem out of date? If anything, it seems intuitive to press the left shoulder button to rotate the camera left. Have you any better suggestions? I can't think of many. "
The right analog like every other game (that isn't on a handheld).
#12 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Abyssfull:

Was Vagrant Story released when most PS1 games used analog sticks?
#13 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: Was Vagrant Story released when most PS1 games used analog sticks? "
Not many no, but what's that got to do with anything? I did say 'a s is the way with most PS1 games'. Vagrant Story is amongst the many that are incredibly dated, because of ancient control philosophies for Japanese developed games. Just because it was the norm then doesn't make it any less dated looking back, and playing, now, and well that's pretty much the definition of a game that's dated. 

You should also note that I address plenty of old age tropes with Metal Gear Solid as well.
#14 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Abyssfull:

I'm just saying that it may be unfair to expect something that the game couldn't really deliver at the time. But even then, I don't see what's so bad and dated about using the shoulder buttons to rotate the camera. I don't remember it hindering any of my gaming experiences in the past.
#15 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: I'm just saying that it may be unfair to expect something that the game couldn't really deliver at the time. But even then, I don't see what's so bad and dated about using the shoulder buttons to rotate the camera. I don't remember it hindering any of my gaming experiences in the past. "
Yeah, I wouldn't of either so long ago. Which brings me to my other point of that I never played this when it was new, so nostalgia isn't here to steam the shades and allow me to be more forgiving towards it. Plus it's not like it was simply a few archaic control decisions that shunned me away from it. There's still the problem of the game having really muddy environments and dull combat. If I never played MGS: Special Missions back in like 1999 or whatever I know I wouldn't of been able to still appreciate it and actually play through it for as long I have recently.
#16 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Abyssfull:

I didn't play it when it originally came out, either, so I'm not affected by nostalgia. Ever. However, I was just pointing out how the controls don't seem to be much of an issue. I wasn't talking about the combat or the graphics or whatever. I probably would, if I finished the game.
#17 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: I didn't play it when it originally came out, either, so I'm not affected by nostalgia. Ever. However, I was just pointing out how the controls don't seem to be much of an issue. I wasn't talking about the combat or the graphics or whatever. I probably would, if I finished the game. "
Yeah, but aren't you like known for playing super old games regularly anywhoo? I'd of gathered you're pretty used to all kinds of controls schemes.
#18 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Abyssfull:

I am, but again, I see nothing wrong with such control schemes.
#19 Posted by WatanabeKazuma (989 posts) -

How could you mention the music of Yakuza 4 and omit Machine Gun Kiss?


  
  
#20 Posted by GunstarRed (5305 posts) -

I bought  Red Star just before my BC PS3 died. I think I got two levels into it before it died. It was  pretty damn good for a game that you can get on Amazon  for £1.99. I used to look at the MGS missions all the time when I visited game shops, I  used to be put off by  it just being a series of VR missions  but  watching that video with the godzilla soldiers has kinda sold me on it years later... I should probably get that.
#21 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: I am, but again, I see nothing wrong with such control schemes. "
That's my point. Obviously you wouldn't because you're constantly playing games with those kind of control layouts, if not even weirder. If I was filling my playtime with PS1, and older, games, then I too would most likely fit in easily with Vagrant Stories own.

Anywhoo this shouldn't even matter. A whole conversation based upon the game in the blog that only got a single mention -_-'




#22 Posted by luce (4045 posts) -
@Abyssfull said:
" @Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: I'm talking about your two control things. Circle was actually pretty common as confirm in Japan, so buying a Japanese game back then was like an agreement to press Circle instead of X. As for the camera controls, what sucks about the L buttons as camera controls? I'm sure I've seen that in a lot of games. Hell, that's how it works in Dragon Quest VI, along with many other DS games. "
Yeah, I know that was a common design for games back then but it doesn't make it any less of a hassle to work with, with me constantly cancelling out of menus ect. with the X button. It's the same with Metal Gear Solid: Special Missions. And using the shoulder buttons to control the camera is just awful and was far too slow in Vagrant Story at that. I hated it then and I hate it all the more now. It may still be used in DS games, but that doesn't make it any less out of date. "
If you buy it as a PSN classic, can't you just swap the O button for the X in the control settings? Whats the big deal with that? But I agree, from what little I've played of it, the environments have the Gears of War color pallet without the snappy game-play to make up for it. 

Still want to do a playthrough of it though...on my PSP. Where these old things belong.
#23 Edited by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@WatanabeKazuma: 
Personally, I prefer this un. B-)

  
  
@marioncobretti said:

" I bought  Red Star just before my BC PS3 died. I think I got two levels into it before it died. It was  pretty damn good for a game that you can get on Amazon  for £1.99. I used to look at the MGS missions all the time when I visited game shops, I  used to be put off by  it just being a series of VR missions  but  watching that video with the godzilla soldiers has kinda sold me on it years later... I should probably get that. "

Shame it hasn't been put up on the PS-store, since this requires the original MGS as well as a PS1/PS2 to play as well. More effort than most would be willing to make do with, I'm sure. Plus the problem is that to get all the really fun and zany stuff you have to trudge through all the boring and mundane, like the stealth/weapon levels. Still, glad to know I piqued your interest all the same, and cheers for the follow :P


@luce said:
" @Abyssfull said:
" @Video_Game_King said:
" @Abyssfull: I'm talking about your two control things. Circle was actually pretty common as confirm in Japan, so buying a Japanese game back then was like an agreement to press Circle instead of X. As for the camera controls, what sucks about the L buttons as camera controls? I'm sure I've seen that in a lot of games. Hell, that's how it works in Dragon Quest VI, along with many other DS games. "
Yeah, I know that was a common design for games back then but it doesn't make it any less of a hassle to work with, with me constantly cancelling out of menus ect. with the X button. It's the same with Metal Gear Solid: Special Missions. And using the shoulder buttons to control the camera is just awful and was far too slow in Vagrant Story at that. I hated it then and I hate it all the more now. It may still be used in DS games, but that doesn't make it any less out of date. "
If you buy it as a PSN classic, can't you just swap the O button for the X in the control settings? Whats the big deal with that? But I agree, from what little I've played of it, the environments have the Gears of War color pallet without the snappy game-play to make up for it. 

Still want to do a playthrough of it though...on my PSP. Where these old things belong.
"
Maybe. It's been a while since I played it now, though I'm fairly sure I did give it a look. I still have it on my PS3 so I may give it another go soon enough.
#24 Posted by WalkerTR77 (1380 posts) -

I would like to request a visit to pokemon snap. That game was the shit.

#25 Posted by WalkerTR77 (1380 posts) -

I would like to request a visit to pokemon snap. That game was the shit.

#26 Posted by Claude (16254 posts) -

I knew about the Metal Gear game, but those other ones I had never heard of. Interesting read, always love learning something new that's old. A little piece of history if you will.

#27 Posted by Yummylee (22066 posts) -
@WalkerTR77 said:
" I would like to request a visit to pokemon snap. That game was the shit. "
So much shit that it needed to be posted twice? :O Anywhoo for you, I totally would snap me some Pokemon

@Claude
said:
" I knew about the Metal Gear game, but those other ones I had never heard of. Interesting read, always love learning something new that's old. A little piece of history if you will. "

It's... kinda eerie for such a Sage as yourself to be learning a lil something new from a blog of mine :P And thanks for reading!