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#51 Posted by audioBusting (1465 posts) -

If it's free, I don't see any reason for people not to. Multi-booting, son!

#52 Posted by ShiftyMagician (2129 posts) -

I guess they should've done a better job revealing details about what exactly SteamOS is, because skimming through this thread I see a few different assumptions (and ones that differ from mine, too).

I was under the impression that SteamOS was simply a Linux distro that I could potentially install and dual-boot on my already-existing PC, as well as being the OS that will run on whatever the SteamBox ends up being. Is the first part not the case?

You're right on the money on that honestly. The whole SteamOS idea simply seems like their way to drive interest in linux as a mainstream platform but with Valve's own coat of paint. They need to give more details later down the road though as to how much of an OS it ends up being. If Big Picture is a native interface and that I can switch back and forth between that and a regular desktop when I need it, then we're getting somewhere. Also if basically any linux program can be installed to it like any other distro without much fuss, then it would be a lot more useful down the road when it's in a SteamBox form-factor, whatever it may be.

Still early days on how appealing it will be to the masses though. The next two announcements will be real interesting and I wonder when they'll detail their controller API (because it be nonsense if they go this far without one now).

#53 Posted by Fattony12000 (6964 posts) -

I love the colour scheme, font and logo, at the very least.

#54 Posted by Ares42 (2559 posts) -

@arabes: But do you really think there's a substantial market of people that are willing and able to both run a dual-boot on their system and have a desire for what SteamOS delivers ? The way I see it we're talking about more or less an old-school style PC marketshare, you know people who are mainly PC gamers interested in max performance and actually know what they are doing with computers.

That's not to say it can't grow and become more popular, but I can't imagine it making any major impact for a long long time.

#55 Posted by RazielCuts (2911 posts) -

@fattony12000: That's because its so OSX, design is their prerogative.

We shall see what the other 2 announcements are but so far I'm nonplussed. I don't think for work I could live my life on SteamOS, combination of OSX and Win7 for me. And then if it's just to make it easier for a console esque box to transition into the living room I don't see if you were that way inclined you wouldn't already have your PC hooked up to your TV anyway. I guess the streaming is cool and makes that sort of easier but yeah?

#56 Posted by Wuddel (2078 posts) -

I have a PC at my employer for my work, a personal MacBook for all my "personal computing" needs, and a PC for games. The only other application I run on the PC apart from the games is Chrome so I might as well switch to Steam OS. Though most of the games I play (EUIV, CK2, Civ5, TotalWar .... stuff like that takes up the majority of my gaming time) I would want to play sitting down in a chair and use a mouse and keyboard.

I do not understand what people actually use computers for. Sure when you are a student you need one. I ran a bunch of specialized software during grad school. Also naturally if you are self-employed you will actually use a computer for more than email. But so far I could get by with just an iPad for "personal computing" and something to play games on.

#57 Edited by tescovee (349 posts) -

How come no one has mentioned the elephant in the room? Proprietary graphics drivers vs Gallium3D mesa (and how both are a pita). Assuming steamos use a derivative of Ubuntu...and lets say you have an ATI card. 'radeon' mesa open drivers are easy to set up and get running out of the box, but they are pretty shitty when it comes to playing native 3d games never mind something ported (not to mention how poor they are with flash and HD movies ). So the other option would be to use the proprietary fglrx driver from amd. These can be a bitch to set up (and upgrade) depending on your card/hardware (has been this way for a long time). Now for Nvidia the open Nouveau Gallium3D driver is just plain bad for 3d the NVIDIA binary driver is much faster. Nvidia proprietary drivers are easier to upgrade and setup but still require some form of tinkering (especially if you have dual monitors).

The real question I am asking is how can any of this take off without massive amounts of money and support towards the open sources or proprietary drivers to ever compete on a level with windows? and this is just the tip of the iceberg. MTP support in debian based distros can be a nightmare. I had to rewrite then recompile a driver just to get MTP to work with my phone. I have been using Debian/ubuntu .deb pkg style distros since 2000 and I just can't see this really taking off on consumers who want a plug and play experience.

#58 Posted by Rowr (5474 posts) -

I guess they should've done a better job revealing details about what exactly SteamOS is, because skimming through this thread I see a few different assumptions (and ones that differ from mine, too).

I was under the impression that SteamOS was simply a Linux distro that I could potentially install and dual-boot on my already-existing PC, as well as being the OS that will run on whatever the SteamBox ends up being. Is the first part not the case?

This is exactly what i assume this is.

I think there's probably a lot of ignorance regarding what linux actually is and how it works.

#59 Posted by Andorski (5178 posts) -

You guys know you can dual boot, right?

Why dual boot when you can already play your games on WinOS and use BPM to get a living room friendly UI?

Online
#60 Edited by Chaser324 (6264 posts) -

@rowr said:

@ajamafalous said:

I guess they should've done a better job revealing details about what exactly SteamOS is, because skimming through this thread I see a few different assumptions (and ones that differ from mine, too).

I was under the impression that SteamOS was simply a Linux distro that I could potentially install and dual-boot on my already-existing PC, as well as being the OS that will run on whatever the SteamBox ends up being. Is the first part not the case?

This is exactly what i assume this is.

I think there's probably a lot of ignorance regarding what linux actually is and how it works.

Yeah. As far as I can tell, SteamOS is basically just a custom Linux distro with a desktop environment and applications created by Valve.

Moderator
#61 Posted by djou (850 posts) -

If anything about the SteamOS involves partitioning my HDD in anyway, then I'm not interested. This is the reason I don't have Linux installed, not using Windows is a non-starter. I have no love for Windows 8 but I need it for work. The Windows Steam client will still play most games so I can't see a compelling reason why I would switch. If Valve sold a separate hard drive with the OS pre-installed then that's another story.

The promise of L4D3 or HL3 also does not sway me. I recently went back and played HL and HL2 and they have not aged well. I have a lot of nostalgia for those games but their legacy is over hyped. Unless HL3 is something ground breaking there's no chance I'm installing a new OS for it.

Regardless of what Valve does, if you want to play a PC game you will always need a monitor, keyboard, and mouse. I own an HTPC and games like Crusader Kings, Civ, and Starcraft will never be playable on TV and those are the only types of games not available on consoles. Unless Valve meaningfully addresses the divide of PC games that can't work on consoles then no thanks, I'm happy with my current Steam client.

#62 Edited by Sammo21 (3204 posts) -

1. Right now SteamOS only has gamers in mind; its crazy to think that businesses and homes will be switching to SteamOS in droves without no real proof or reason other than "STEAM!"

2. There are already perfectly fine and easy ways to play PC on your television without streaming or a set top box. A set top box on its own is antithetical to PC gaming and the moddable/upgradeable nature of the beast. If the box is made to be upgraded then its in the same boat as a desktop for the mainstream PC audience: aka, they don't want to do it.

3. Anyone who thinks SteamOS is a threat to console gaming already has a slant towards PC gaming and needs to take a breath and be logical.

#63 Posted by TWISTEDH34T (51 posts) -
@andorski said:

@ruthloose said:

Here's my guess:

Friday's announcement Half-Life 3 release date - Linux platform only.

Gabe Newell 1 > Internet 0.

People will them side-load SteamOS on their rigs, play the game, and then uninstall. No one game is worth having to change the entire way you use your computer.


Or people, like me, just won't buy it. I liked Half Life 2, but it's definitely not the best invention since sliced bread.

@marokai said:

What gets me about this announcement is that it seems completely pointless in and of itself. Perhaps Linux could become a meaningful gaming platform years in the future, but right now? If you're a console gamer, this isn't for you. If you're deep into PC gaming already, you don't need this. If you're a non-gamer, nothing about this makes you want it.

That's exactly how I feel.

@marokai said:

Gabe and Valve may think they're going to destroy the way gaming audiences have formed over the last decades with these announcements, but they do nothing for me, and nothing for anyone already into PC gaming, unless your response to this announcement was "OMG VALVE YES I WILL FOLLOW VALVE TO THE END OF THE EARTH."

You'd be surprised at how many people think that. I feel that Valve's gotten away with questionable things in the past that other developers/publishers wouldn't get away with. People complain about needing to run clients to play their PC games, calling it "scary DRM", forgetting that Steam is exactly that. People just got more used to it as time went on.

#64 Posted by McLargepants (356 posts) -

Valve is putting their full weight behind it, in a few years, maybe even sooner, all Steam games will be released on SteamOS. What that doesn't include is most MMOs, League of Legends and EA games. I'm definitely going to at least have dual boot situation in my PC to see what it's all about. I'm seriously excited for a couch friendly operating system.

#65 Posted by Darson (442 posts) -

Why would I want the features of the "XBox entertainment package" as an OS?

#66 Posted by Arabes (338 posts) -

@ares42: I think if they have the performance boost and the accessibility then they'll get PC gamers to dual boot. They tend to be more tech savvy than their console gaming comrades generally just out of pure necessity, PC gaming can be a bit fucked at times :) They'll need to demonstrate that it's worth while like they did with steam. If they can do those two things and they have the compatible games then I'd say give them 5 years and they'll have a lot of hardcore PC gamers using their OS (probably as dual boot). I don't know what those figures look like but PC gaming is still huge. If this works out for them then it'll pave the way for a steam box to compete with the consoles.

#67 Posted by EXTomar (4453 posts) -

The thing console platforms have is a tightly integrated distribution and purchasing system which helps insure maximizing profits. People don't love Windows as much as see it as the means to the end.

#68 Posted by BaconGames (3280 posts) -

There are only two elements worth asking about at this point before knowing the full suite of announcements: catalog and optimization. Who gets a catalog add and who doesn't? Windows users already have access to everything and since they represent the super-majority of operating systems, chances are they are the only ones poised to "lose" the few games that are bold enough to go SteamOS and/or Mac only but again, it will probably be so easy to dual-boot that Windows users can hedge their setups to guarantee they get everything.

Alternatively, the catalog add is more in the Linux and Mac camps. If SteamOS is a light and efficient OS for Steam, then dual booting on a Mac instead of Windows starts making a lot more sense for those supported games. As more games get SteamOS support retroactively and moving forward, any game that then doesn't get a Mac port gives people the best plan B they've had in the history of PC gaming. Similar logic applies to Linux users except they just get the increased adoption rate inherent to Valve pushing something like this. Steam was a shot in the arm for PC games on the Mac and this is probably going to be the same for Linux. I think what makes this work is Valve having the clout to push their own distro in the front of Steam thereby giving a huge supplement to a relatively small number of people using Linux at the moment for gaming.

I think legacy and productivity are two big arguments that probably guarantee a majority of people who play games on Steam stick to Windows. However, the big picture with SteamOS is making that relationship much more interchangeable, as Valve has done with Mac and to a lesser extent Linux porting. This is basically the ability to install Steam on any OS except now you don't need to install your own in the first place to run Steam.

Now I didn't talk much about optimization because I've been integrating here and there already. Basically if SteamOS is not as lean as they claim, then useability will be hampered and people won't be much impressed. If they can do that and optimize further for game performance where they can, then it might be a great reason to use SteamOS for power users who want to squeeze as much out of new games.

#69 Edited by alwaysbebombing (1520 posts) -

Can I watch porn on it?

Hot butt vids.

#70 Edited by Hunkulese (2628 posts) -

I wonder if the same people embracing SteamOS are the same people who lambasted Origin. SteamOS and Origin are both pointless and unnecessary.

#71 Posted by brites101 (8 posts) -

I love the concept of PC gaming at the living room. i think SteamOS is a great concept, even tho i would probably use a real distro.

#72 Posted by Sin4profit (2903 posts) -

I feel like if Valve can make a powerful and robust OpenGL SDK out of the Source 2 engine and make it a free license to work with then they may have a shot of increasing interest in OpenGL.

If Valve and Sony can sway developers away from DirectX then they can make Microsoft's piece of the pie far less relevant and the SteamOS will make more sense then.

#73 Edited by xyzygy (9870 posts) -

But the games will still come out for Windows. It's not like developers would purposefully ignore the massive majority that Windows holds.

#74 Edited by Jimbo (9769 posts) -

SteamOS becoming dominant would probably be the final nail in gaming's coffin for me. I've almost entirely lost interest in it as it is.