#1 Edited by spyder335 (265 posts) -

anyone here ever try it?

dnd seems like a something ive always wanted to try but never found any of my friends that wanted to play, so i was considering trying it online with others via web cam

any thoughts?

anyone here with dnd experience that would be interested

#2 Posted by SomeDeliCook (2071 posts) -

Based on your avatar I'm assuming you are talking about Duke Nukem 3D and made a typo forgetting the 3 in the abbreviation, and for that I got to say it would be bizarre to play that game while webcamming yourself.

Actually no, I do know what you meant. I think if you were going to play it through a webcam, your better off looking for a video game substitute of sorts, if something like that even exists. Or some type of roleplay. No sense spending money on miniatures or anything if its not going to be in person.

#3 Posted by monkey523 (175 posts) -

@SomeDeliCook: based on your post, I noticed @spyder335 's avatar, and based on that, I read his post in duke nukem's voice.

#4 Posted by spyder335 (265 posts) -

i didnt think dnd uses minitures.

i thought the whole game was verbal, with dice rolls for chance

#5 Posted by Karkarov (2622 posts) -

@spyder335 said:

i didnt think dnd uses minitures.

i thought the whole game was verbal, with dice rolls for chance

It can use miniatures but it doesn't have to. Not sure about the whole webcam concept but I know people have used special chat rooms to run D&D campaigns for a long time.

#6 Posted by HarlechQuinn (438 posts) -

@spyder335: You might use miniatures/tokens and a battle grid/map for the tactical aspects (e. g. keeping track of the push/pull/slide movements etc.) of a combat encounter, especially since movement became more important in the fourth edition.

#7 Posted by TobbRobb (4408 posts) -

@HarlechQuinn said:

@spyder335: You might use miniatures/tokens and a battle grid/map for the tactical aspects (e. g. keeping track of the push/pull/slide movements etc.) of a combat encounter, especially since movement became more important in the fourth edition.

And now I lost all hope of ever caring about this game.

If someone get me to play DnD, I'm playing a fucking Coward Merchant. Just so I never have to understand the dice rolls.

#8 Posted by CheapPoison (708 posts) -

IF you don't use miniatures, don't go DnD look for another role playing game.

DnD and especially the current edition is very scewed toward combat, and does it very well. But to get the benefit of that you need a map and figures so you can have some tactical movement. That doesn't mean you can't do some interesting roleplaying with it by just speaking but it seems there are better one for that around. And way more feasible over a webcam.

#9 Posted by ChaosDent (233 posts) -

I DM a 4th edition D&D game with both local and remote players using a program called MapTool and Skype for voice. We once used a webcam to let a single remote player view a physical map with minis, but I wouldn't recommend that. As mentioned above, D&D has always been primarily about combat and has to a greater or lesser degree been miniatures based.

#10 Posted by Vanek (376 posts) -

We used to use a program called Fantasy Grounds when we played online. The program has all the features you need (Character sheets, maps/miniatures, random dice generators, chat functions and more) and it worked really well for us. We did have to all buy it, but it was worth it.

#11 Posted by Brodehouse (9370 posts) -

@CheapPoison: It has more combat rules, because those are when people get the most dickish and argumentative. It's the DM who decides if a campaign is combat heavy or social heavy or investigation heavy or exploration heavy.

At the same time, I switched to World of Darkness because I prefer the setting, I liked the focus on skills over hit dice and so on, and I liked that it's more malleable than D&D (I changed the 24 skill system to a 15 skill system and separated combat stats so no one had to suck in one whole area of the game).

You can play over webcam and so on, but unless you are mic'd extremely well, it can become frustrating. So much of RPGs is a bunch of cross-talk, which simply doesn't play on skype.

#12 Edited by CheapPoison (708 posts) -

@Brodehouse: I won't deny that, but cause of the heavy focus on combat i think it won't be the best fit. But ye it is more the dungeon master who sets the pace but like you said yourself, might aswell take one of those systems that are more flexible on other levels.

And i don't have too much experience with it but stuff like the new(ish) warhammer fantasy roleplaying, the combat is more abstract so should be easier to just talk yourself through. And the dice system seemed to be more flexible for other purposes and to be manipulated by the dungeon master for the sake of the moment. But i really have no idea if it could work and if it has much bearing on it. Might be an interesting thing to tried, thought about it myself if someone thought of that or if there is a program that functions as , i guess an interface. Like Vassal for boardgames.

Come to think of it you can probably use that in conjunction with voice if you wanted to set up more of a combat scenario or if you wanted to use miniatures over the web.

Edit: ow it seems there have been a few interesting suggestions already, neat!