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#1 Edited by Earth001 (36 posts) -

*remove posts*

#2 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

No...hell no, never.

#3 Posted by MonkeyKing1969 (2562 posts) -

I regret no, but I do think you need to be balanced. If you watch TV, then play video games, and then watch a movie; and that is most of your life...well, regret two of those things. I have cut out watching live TV, it was hard at first, now I don't miss it now. I work, I play games, and I go out to the gym or do my chores around the house. The games are my 'free time' thing, so I don't watch TV and what I do watch is one episode of something on Netflix. Typically when I got to the gym I watch the news...so while I'm exercising I get the weather, the news, and see what is going on....but mostly I'm doing my reps. My guess is in ten years all gyms will come with head tracking displays...I'll be playing CoD while I'm on a 3D treadmill.

#4 Edited by Deckard42 (125 posts) -

Playing games is fun and it makes me happy. I've done it for a long time and don't plan on stopping during this lifetime. If you regret the time you spend doing something you probably shouldn't do it no matter what it is. MonkeyKing has it right, it's all about balance. As an adult I only have so much free time for hobbies so I have to decide what I'm going to spend that time on and gaming is number one.

#5 Posted by FluxWaveZ (19307 posts) -

Absolutely not. Video games have been there for me during the most difficult times of my life and I wouldn't have been able to go on if I didn't have games to lean back on.

#6 Posted by Evilsbane (4531 posts) -

Listen life isn't all that interesting, if you find something that you enjoy doing you should do it as much as possible. I think about all the games I haven't played those will be my regrets.

#7 Posted by Nefarious_Al (127 posts) -

You should never regret doing something you enjoy. "Find what you love and let it kill you" -Bukowski

#8 Edited by Snail (8579 posts) -

What you get from the great books, movies, and even TV series is not comparable to what you get from the best of games. Stories allow you to transcend. Games have taught me little, and have made me little wiser.

I still enjoy them and play them. Some of the most fun I've ever had was spent with games, with friends and by myself. Those countless hours of playing tense matches of Smash Bros. were hysterically awesome, and I can't and will not "regret" the time I spent sailing an ocean and controlling the winds in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, living and breathing the story of a young hero, and the world in which it all unravelled.

The way I experience and then remember music is obviously different from the way I experience and then remember films, ditto for books. And ditto for games, which means they are a unique type of experience unto themselves. But as they stand today, games aren't offering a lot other than sheer fun and wonder, which doesn't really make my life significantly better, smarter, or wiser. I still love what games give me, but if you consume too much of it, you might end up wishing you had been doing something else instead. You don't tend to learn anything valuable for your life out of games.

I've also been wanting to enjoy different types of games. I'm really looking forward to FRACT OSC, and to see how it'll overlay some sick electronic music over abstract visual spectacle triggered by your own interactivity with its world.

That's how I feel anyway. You do whatever makes you happy.

#9 Posted by ozzler (2 posts) -

I went through a phase of potential regret. However as time passes and I mature I realised one profound thing.

Gaming is a fucking awesome passion.

It transcends the boundaries of art, competition and social constructs. Ticks all the boxes. I love "e-sports" starcraft/CS mainly, and have friends who I share this with. At the same time I enjoy the many insightful, poetic and inspiring narrative driven games that consistently come out each year. Finally I love to sit down and just soak up the raw mechanical rush games can provide (most recent example would be trials fusion).

Gaming has so many phenomenal facets, I'm not saying it replaces other art forms, but it certainly has many unique aspects to it which is why I find it so compelling and will always come back to it.

I'm 22 now and have recently come to terms with the fact that I never intend to stop playing games until the day I die. This isn't something people need to, or should be expected to, grow out of. Gaming is and will continue to be at the front of the cultural revolution.

#10 Posted by mosespippy (4032 posts) -

I'll continue to play games until I die or am physically unable to. I knew a blind guy who loved playing monopoly and he could keep track of the board in his head as long as you told him which corner was Go. I have almost completely given up watching TV and movies because the average show or movie is filler of no value. The thing that I find separates games from film is active thought. There is no game that doesn't involve lots of thinking, planning and analyzing and I find that mental exercise to be valuable.

#11 Posted by MachoFantastico (4488 posts) -

Sometimes I think I do, but then again video games became an essential escape for me at one dark point in my life so I'm grateful for them. Plus I've got to see some pretty amazing stuff over the years thanks to video games.

#12 Edited by Dimi3je (297 posts) -

#13 Posted by Lanechanger (451 posts) -

I love this thread and all the answers in it, what a community to be a part of!

#14 Posted by pyromagnestir (4240 posts) -

Yep.

You only get so much time in your life, and I regret everything I've done with mine because my life to this point has been pretty much pointless. But that's more a factor of me being bad at life, and less an issue with gaming in particular.

#15 Posted by Oscar__Explosion (2195 posts) -

But couldn't you say that about ANYTHING? Why is gaming being target specifically?

In any case don't regret doing the things that you love to do.

#16 Posted by Clonedzero (4091 posts) -

No, i regret not having more of a social life. But my lack of a social life isn't because of video games, its for other reasons. I love video games, i don't let them get in the way of anything though so they're not a problem in the slightest. So yea, no regrets about video games. Plenty of other regrets in life though....

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#17 Posted by l4wd0g (1907 posts) -

Absolutely. When I look back, I see I have wasted so much of my life and money on inane things. I could have been spent that time helping others but I didn't. Video games remind me of how truly selfish I am.

#18 Edited by Skyfire543 (657 posts) -

I still read what I'm interested in, watch movies that I'm interested in, I socialize with people I like, all of that balanced with playing the games I'm interested in. I do what makes me happy, and games do that... so no. I don't think I'll ever regret it.

#19 Posted by Rafaelfc (1313 posts) -

I tend to regret the amount of money I spend whenever I go out with friends way more than the 5-6 hours a week I spend on gaming.

#20 Posted by IrrelevantJohn (1026 posts) -

Nah, why would I regret doing something I enjoyed at the time? Even if I stop playing games when I'm older, I could care less about what I did in the past. I've made some good friends through gaming and I'm grateful for that.

There are times I regret playing video games but that was just me being dumb like not studying for a test/exam or not sleeping sometimes lol.

#21 Posted by SupberUber (276 posts) -

Same as book-burning, new music-genres corrupting our youth, brain-rotting comics, brainwashing movies and instant access to a worldwide web of data dulling our memory and attention-span.

The whole video game industry is barely older than I am.

The other mediums have "always" been there, and therefore familiar and safe. Having said that, movies were under heavy scrutiny during the 80's for desensitizing kids and teens to violence.

As for your question, I'm not sure.
I grew up with it, so it's normal to me.
In contrast, facebook and such feels kind of alien to me, but there you go.

#22 Posted by s10129107 (1179 posts) -

I have depression. I play games when I'm depressed. When that happens I typically go overboard and don't eat or sleep for a while which feeds the depression. In those instances, yes.

#23 Posted by csl316 (8098 posts) -

No, if you liked doing something at the time it was worth it.

#24 Posted by afabs515 (1010 posts) -

Never. I've met a lot of great people through gaming. I wouldn't have had roughly 2/3 of the friends I had in high school without Xbox LIVE. I've even met complete strangers through gaming whom I really enjoy interacting with. Besides that, gaming is fun and I have a passion for it. I can't tell you anything about sports, politics, etc. But if you sit me down and ask me to talk about how I feel about the state of the gaming world, I can speak for hours with you about it. I do so with my roommate semi-regularly. So to reiterate, I will never regret my passion for gaming.

#25 Posted by DeadpanCakes (791 posts) -

If it wasn't games I wasted away with growing up, it would be something I enjoyed less, so... no?

#26 Edited by JadeGL (746 posts) -

I regret falling out of gaming for a few years in high school. I missed out on some cool stuff, and I am trying to catch up now. ;)

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#27 Posted by Hailinel (23874 posts) -

Not now, not ever.

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#28 Posted by Ezakael (911 posts) -

I don't think I'll ever regret playing games. I've had some great memories from gaming, playing Mario Kart and lots of other games of that era with tons of friends was a blast. They have also helped me get my mind off of things I'd rather not think about, they help relieve stress, and they are just pretty darn fun in general. I think I'll continue to play them for a very long time.

#29 Edited by Rotnac (613 posts) -

Absolutely not. Video gaming will always be a part of my life because I enjoy it. There are games that make me laugh and some that make me think. Some games just simply terrify me and there's others that just help relax. It's a medium that can create bitter rivalries or bring people together. Why would I ever regret that?

#30 Posted by zombiepenguin9 (529 posts) -

@jadegl said:

I regret falling out of gaming for a few years in high school. I missed out on some cool stuff, and I am trying to catch up now. ;)

Pretty much this. I played very few games during the past two generations, and while I'm enjoying going through such a rich back catalog, I wish I could have experienced a lot of it during the zeitgeist.

#31 Posted by leebmx (2215 posts) -

@jadegl: Exactly the same with me. I pretty much stopped gaming between 16 and 30 so missed out on a whole load of stuff, and unlike other media, gaming is a pastime which is much harder to catch on because most stuff ages so badly. While I'm pleased I did other things there are a lot gaming experiences I would have liked to have at the time.

#32 Posted by Stonyman65 (2591 posts) -

Nope. Never. Some of the best times in my life so far have somehow involved video games. Too many good memories to regret something.

#33 Posted by tariqari (430 posts) -

I can't believe most people have no regrets about it. Either you all play very little or you are not really considering what the OP is talking about.

Everyday I wonder how much better my life would be if I didn't have the distraction of gaming around. I feel like it has held me back from being the best I could be. I'd probably be a lot happier, more social, more understanding, and in shape. I'd probably even be married with like half a dozen kids...but the slavery of the screen.

I definitely blame gaming as much as myself for that.

#34 Posted by FluxWaveZ (19307 posts) -

@tariqari said:

Everyday I wonder how much better my life would be if I didn't have the distraction of gaming around. I feel like it has held me back from being the best I could be. I'd probably be a lot happier, more social, more understanding, and in shape. I'd probably even be married with like half a dozen kids...but the slavery of the screen.

I definitely blame gaming as much as myself for that.

Then that's a problem and you should seek to remedy it however you can. Most of us don't consider ourselves slaves to video games like you apparently do, so of course we don't regret our choices.

#35 Posted by VierasTalo (673 posts) -

At some point in life I will regret it, just like I regret everything I've ever done despite loving most of it. That's just the way I tend to be.

#36 Posted by tourgen (4427 posts) -

The people who've told me they regret gaming really meant they regretted not doing things they always wanted to do, and instead played video games because it was easier and safer.

So if you feel like there are things you want to be doing but are using video games, TV, etc to avoid getting started, then yeah, you're in for some pain and regret later.

#37 Edited by tariqari (430 posts) -

@tourgen said:

The people who've told me they regret gaming really meant they regretted not doing things they always wanted to do, and instead played video games because it was easier and safer.

So if you feel like there are things you want to be doing but are using video games, TV, etc to avoid getting started, then yeah, you're in for some pain and regret later.

What's the solution? Because not doing something that is an almost daily thing is a lot harder than it sounds.

#38 Edited by Wired_Abyss (37 posts) -

The only time I could see myself regretting playing games is if I were to get into a MMO and I start playing it non-stop.

#39 Posted by Nux (2304 posts) -

No at all. I have been playing video games since I was 5 and I don't ever see myself stopping with them. Even though I play them quite a lot I still have a good social life. I don't see a reason to regret doing something you enjoy doing. If you like it do it.

#40 Edited by militantfreudian (91 posts) -

I don't think gaming has helped me through hardships or anything like that, but it's been a good way to unwind. That said, if it weren't for video games, I probably wouldn't have discovered Giant Bomb. At times, I feel like I love this site more than gaming itself -- this not to say that I don't enjoy playing video games a lot. I had great memeories here. I hope that when I look back at gaming, I recognise this, and hopefully not regret it.

#41 Posted by whopper1631 (4 posts) -

No way, there's way worse things that you can do then play video games, like be a drug junkie and be a menace to society. I think in the long run you'll be happier, and sharing that happiness with other people is a good thing.

I know people that stopped playing video games, as a means of "growing up". They have become miserable because there's no way escaping from the humdrum of life or simply having a hobby that you can look forward to.

#42 Posted by Aetheldod (3509 posts) -
#43 Edited by Enuff (20 posts) -

#44 Edited by EuanDewar (4756 posts) -

Every day.

Sometimes I just sit there, staring at the Peggle main menu with Method Man's Tical 2000 playing on repeat, thinking about my deep regret for ever picking up a game boy.

#45 Posted by ADAMWD (564 posts) -

Nope. If you start thinking like that then soon everything in life will just be a waste of time.

#46 Posted by crithon (3075 posts) -

Nope..... hence why I shutter when I think of Spelunky because of the time I spent with Spelunker on the NES.

#47 Posted by thatdutchguy (1271 posts) -

Nope.

#48 Edited by DinosaurCanada (85 posts) -

No, but I will certainly regret most of my time on the internet.

#49 Posted by tariqari (430 posts) -

So no one wishes they did something SUPER awesome that they would have been able todo if it weren't for Video Games? Don't get me wrong, I am not bashing gaming or anything but I can't be the only one who thinks this seriously.

#50 Posted by Brendan (7687 posts) -

In general? No. I do regret gaming far too much in place of working harder in school. Growing up, I was not good at controlling my intake of entertainment and it turned me into a procrastinator. I am still trying to will myself out of those habits to his day.