#1 Posted by christopherson329 (210 posts) -

Why do they allow you to say no in RPGs such a zelda and pokemon when if you say no then it just goes into a loop of dialog that begs you to say yes is it just some long running joke or do they just do it to make it feel like we have a choice when we really dont?

#2 Posted by BeachThunder (11697 posts) -

I haven't played the full version yet, but I feel that the answer lies somewhere in The Stanley Parable...

#3 Posted by EveretteScott (1449 posts) -

Illusion of choice, inside joke, pointless keep over from earlier games, whichever fits.

I thought this topic was going to be about when getting quests in rpgs. They ask you if you want to help and you can say no. That I don't understand, why would you ever say no and deny yourself xp.

#4 Edited by christopherson329 (210 posts) -

@everettescott: true but some times the quest giver is a real mother fucker.

#5 Edited by MonetaryDread (1992 posts) -

@everettescott: true but some times the quest giver is a real mother fucker.

I agree with @everettescott on this one. Even if the character is mother fucker I still accept the quest. Maybe it has to do with the fact that I play RPG's for the mechanics and grinding instead of immersion and "role playing."

#6 Posted by christopherson329 (210 posts) -
#7 Posted by BisonHero (6171 posts) -

It's for kids?

Look, I enjoy some of those games (Zelda, for example). But seriously, any game that does that is probably meant for kids. Still able to be appreciated by adults - but really, they're designing it towards kids.

Because kids are 6, and when a game says "Will you accept this mighty quest, young hero?", kids are gonna say yes, because hell yeah they want to be the hero. Little kids aren't sitting there, trying to turn Zelda/Pokemon into The Stanley Parable. They don't want to see what clever scenario the game offers when you say no (and there is no such scenario anyways).

#8 Posted by Brodehouse (9586 posts) -

But Thou Must!

#9 Edited by christopherson329 (210 posts) -
#10 Posted by BisonHero (6171 posts) -

@christopherson329 said:

@bisonhero: okay i agree with your rational

I'd actually love to know if Nintendo does playtests/focus groups with little kids, how many of them actually say "no" in those moments. I bet they are genuinely afraid it will say "game over" or end the story if they say no.

Still, it feels cool to little kids that they get the choice to say "Yeah, I'll defeat the bad guy and save the day!", even though you and I obviously realize it is a false choice.

#11 Posted by christopherson329 (210 posts) -

@bisonhero: yeah i would love to see that data it would be a very interesting read and could possibly be a good topic for my psychology class

#12 Posted by MonetaryDread (1992 posts) -
#13 Edited by christopherson329 (210 posts) -
#14 Posted by martez87 (67 posts) -

In Super Paper Mario saying 'no' boots you to the title screen, which I thought was pretty funny.

#15 Posted by alwaysbebombing (1539 posts) -

Cause they're catologing the number of dicks on the world by counting people who say "no."

#16 Edited by TowerSixteen (542 posts) -

@christopherson329 said:

@bisonhero: okay i agree with your rational

I'd actually love to know if Nintendo does playtests/focus groups with little kids, how many of them actually say "no" in those moments. I bet they are genuinely afraid it will say "game over" or end the story if they say no.

Still, it feels cool to little kids that they get the choice to say "Yeah, I'll defeat the bad guy and save the day!", even though you and I obviously realize it is a false choice.

I sort of suspect this is part of it. Also, having worked in a daycare setting with kids, and actually playing Pokemon together with some of those kids, I'm willing to hypothesize that having those options interspersed with the text makes a lot of them, particularly more reluctant readers, more likely to actually read the text they might just button through otherwise. I suppose for the same reasons that they're more likely to stop paying attention to a lecture or a monologue than a conversation- it keeps them engaged.

#17 Edited by GERALTITUDE (2923 posts) -

@everettescott said:

Illusion of choice, inside joke, pointless keep over from earlier games, whichever fits.

I thought this topic was going to be about when getting quests in rpgs. They ask you if you want to help and you can say no. That I don't understand, why would you ever say no and deny yourself xp.

because you don't agree with their morals! gosh . Or because you hate them and want them to die. So many reasons.

In Batman: Arkham City when you play as Cat Woman you have to choose between saving Batman and escaping with the money, and if you choose the latter, the game hits the credits, then rewinds back to that point, and you have to pick again.

Online
#18 Edited by Hunter5024 (5542 posts) -

The only reason I might put something like this in a game is so that it doesn't seem like the main character was forced to go on his quest, but rather this was something he (and the player) agreed to do. That way when the farmer asks you to save his daughter from the troll, so that he will give you the mystic gem, so you can use the mystic gem to seal away the evil entity, you might be a little less reluctant about it?

#19 Posted by Video_Game_King (36012 posts) -
Soul Blazer gives no fucks.

#20 Posted by Buble (71 posts) -

@bisonhero: As someone that's done user experience research in the past, and now doing something similar in graduate school, my understanding is it's really hard to do focus groups with kids. If you can get around the legal stuff the facilitator has to be very diligent to make sure they're not just saying what they think he/she wants to hear because you're they're an adult.

#21 Posted by BisonHero (6171 posts) -

@buble: That makes a lot of sense too! Kids are probably super hard to get useful data out of.

#22 Posted by StingingVelvet (569 posts) -

In "real" RPGs saying no is often a way to stay in character. If you're a heroic paladin and someone asks you to rob the bank you would say no, because heroic paladins don't do that shit.

Zelda doesn't have that kind of roleplaying but I would guess they are just emulating RPGs with those dialog options.

#23 Edited by Fredchuckdave (5339 posts) -

@brodehouse said:

But Thou Must!

This. FFVI actually rewarded you for But Thou Musting.

#24 Posted by Hailinel (23901 posts) -

@brodehouse said:

But Thou Must!

This. FFVI actually rewarded you for But Thou Musting.

Oh, yeah. I remember that part. That was pretty cool.

#25 Posted by geirr (2476 posts) -

@monetarydread: then why call it a ROLE PLAYING GAME

Sounds better than just PLAYING GAME? And JPGs is already taken so they added an R. As for why, there's tons of stuff I ask why about in JRPGs and all I come up with is "cuz it worked 20 years ago" and that's where these games are stuck. BOOOOMFffffff.....ffff.

#26 Edited by Hailinel (23901 posts) -

@geirr said:

@christopherson329 said:

@monetarydread: then why call it a ROLE PLAYING GAME

Sounds better than just PLAYING GAME? And JPGs is already taken so they added an R. As for why, there's tons of stuff I ask why about in JRPGs and all I come up with is "cuz it worked 20 years ago" and that's where these games are stuck. BOOOOMFffffff.....ffff.

Sounds like you haven't played any JRPGs for the past twenty years, then.

(Is this where I'm supposed to insert an unearned, self-satisfied boom?)