#1 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

I find this strange how most (if not all) Ubisoft's games do not support LAN. I have slow Internet, so LAN is a biggy for me to play with friends, seeing as I can't join servers. So not being able to play AC or Far Cry 3 over LAN is a shame.

#2 Posted by MB (12479 posts) -

The cost to develop such a feature is considered too high for the relatively small number of people who would actually use LAN play. If only a tenth of one percent of people are ever going to use it, it doesn't make financial sense to spend time coding it...that goes for pretty much any feature. LAN play is more or less a thing of the past, I'm afraid.

Moderator
#3 Posted by harinosho (596 posts) -

@SexyToad said:

I find this strange how most (if not all) Ubisoft's games do not support LAN. I have slow Internet, so LAN is a biggy for me to play with friends, seeing as I can't join servers. So not being able to play AC or Far Cry 3 over LAN is a shame.

How slow is your connection speed anyway?

#4 Posted by responsible_bear (4 posts) -

Allowing LAN makes it easier to for people to play online with pirated copies through programs like hamachi or tunngle.

#5 Posted by RustySanderke (117 posts) -

@responsible_bear said:

Allowing LAN makes it easier to for people to play online with pirated copies through programs like hamachi or tunngle.

This is the only reason. They could have one of their experienced programmers code in the option to use a local host instead of going through a dedicated server in one afternoon, if they wanted to.

#6 Posted by Hero_Swe (1152 posts) -

Yeah no . This has nothing to do with costs of developing LAN support. As it is something a junior network coder could do. It has always been a question of piracy and wanting to force people onto platforms where they can suck more money from their customers.

#7 Posted by ZeForgotten (10397 posts) -

Why Ubisoft only? 
Blizzard fucked it up too 
EA(with their games, not their published stuff), Activision, Paradox hell I could go on if you want me to :P 
 
It's expensive and a waste since not that many people(compared to those who just have internet not made in the stone age :P) who uses LAN anymore

#8 Posted by Bollard (5597 posts) -

@harinosho said:

@SexyToad said:

I find this strange how most (if not all) Ubisoft's games do not support LAN. I have slow Internet, so LAN is a biggy for me to play with friends, seeing as I can't join servers. So not being able to play AC or Far Cry 3 over LAN is a shame.

How slow is your connection speed anyway?

This. I played Call of Duty (a notoriously twitch based game) with down speed of just 50kB/s, and a ping of ~200 and still did well.

If you're getting worse than that you must be on dial up or some shit.

#9 Posted by Little_Socrates (5677 posts) -

@ZeForgotten said:

Why Ubisoft only? Blizzard fucked it up too EA(with their games, not their published stuff), Activision, Paradox hell I could go on if you want me to :P It's expensive and a waste since not that many people(compared to those who just have internet not made in the stone age :P) who uses LAN anymore

@responsible_bear said:

Allowing LAN makes it easier to for people to play online with pirated copies through programs like hamachi or tunngle.

Both of these are the responses that came to mind.

#10 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -
@Chavtheworld

@harinosho said:

@SexyToad said:

I find this strange how most (if not all) Ubisoft's games do not support LAN. I have slow Internet, so LAN is a biggy for me to play with friends, seeing as I can't join servers. So not being able to play AC or Far Cry 3 over LAN is a shame.

How slow is your connection speed anyway?

This. I played Call of Duty (a notoriously twitch based game) with down speed of just 50kB/s, and a ping of ~200 and still did well.

If you're getting worse than that you must be on dial up or some shit.

I have satalite Internet, the down is decent but the ping is ~900.

@ZeForgotten I used Ubisoft since I played Activision and EA games in the past that supported LAN.
Also I would argue that it's not a thing of the past. Let's take minecraft as an example. They recently (in the year) added LAN. If a family or group of friends wanted to play Minecraft before they needed to host a server. Which could be too much of a hassle for some. LAN is simple for a group of friends to get together and just play some games. All they have to do is connect their PCs to the same network and they are good to go.
#11 Posted by Cameron (601 posts) -

The snarky answer is that it's not 1998 anymore. The real answer is likely the piracy concern.

#12 Posted by Phyrlord (171 posts) -

@MB said:

The cost to develop such a feature is considered too high for the relatively small number of people who would actually use LAN play. If only a tenth of one percent of people are ever going to use it, it doesn't make financial sense to spend time coding it...that goes for pretty much any feature. LAN play is more or less a thing of the past, I'm afraid.

Converting online MP to support a lan might take 2hours. If that. It's probably more about the cost of support then implementation.

#13 Posted by lazarenth (28 posts) -

Everyone in this topic saying "it is easy/only takes X hours/is cheap" have probably never developed software as a profession :P

#14 Edited by Phyrlord (171 posts) -

@lazarenth said:

Everyone in this topic saying "it is easy/only takes X hours/is cheap" have probably never developed software as a profession :P

Nope, Only took 4 years of Cisco networking courses @ 10 hours a week (that's just the lectures and material not including 3-5 hours of required lab times).

You think there's a difference between connecting through 3000 routers to your friend in Australia and connecting across 1 to your buddy in the next room; end point wise (aka what the console sees)? It's all the same language.

Like I said, I'm fairly confident it's not a technical/dev cost. More so a support issue as in supporting old MP glitchs when they can be updated through software if you are required to play online.

I could be completely wrong, and I would be surprised. I'm just trying to give a slightly informed opinion on the tech side.