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Posted by patrickklepek (3464 posts) -
This was my face around 1:00 am last night, as the credits finally rolled on Amnesia.

It’s with a huge sigh of relief that I’m able to announce that I’ve finished Amnesia: The Dark Descent. The game had such a profound emotional impact on my psyche that I’m going to table most of my thoughts until I’m able to write them down for a separate story next week, but a great weight has been lifted off of me.

Naturally, a teaser for Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs was released today. The nightmare begins anew!

I’m guessing the next Amnesia will conveniently arrive for Halloween, but before then, I’m trying to fill in my own horror gaps. I’ve never played Eternal Darkness (I know, I know), so a copy of that is coming via eBay next week, and I’ve had a few recommendations to play Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth.

There’s also the other games from Amensia developer Frictional Games, the Penumbra series. All of them were on sale recently, so even if they don’t live up to the hype of Amnesia, I’m curious to track the evolution of that studio in reverse. I know they have combat, which sounds iiiiinteresting? Dipping into Penumbra lines up with my desire to play the deeply flawed I Am Alive this week. I Am Alive isn’t a good game, but we can learn much from bad games.

Are there any not-so-great games that you’ve been able to appreciate, for one reason or another? Chime in.

Hey, You Should Play This:

You might remember Cipher Prime's Auditorium Duet as one of the few Kickstarter projects I’ve highlighted on Giant Bomb. I wrote about it because it seemed likely to not get funded, but in the final hours, it did. This is not about another foray onto Kickstarter for Cipher Prime, but another game that’s absolutely worth your attention: Splice. It doesn’t have anything to do with the just okay 2009 horror film, but they do have a common theme. In both the movie and the game, it’s all about genetic manipulation. In one case, you’re left with a horrifying creature, but in Cipher Prime’s game, there’s a serene, relaxing puzzle game. Players are tasked with dragging and manipulating microbe sequences to line up with a set of patterns, and the sequences become understandably more complicated. It’s rather beautiful, too. We’ll do a Quick Look of this next week, but I wanted to give you guys a heads up for the weekend.

And You Should Read These, Too:

Given the response to Anita Sarkeesian’s Kickstarter, I’m torn on the anonymity question. Imagine what would have happened if Blizzard had gone through with its plan to out everyone on its message boards? The benefits of anonymity are clear, but are the consequences worth it? I’m used to having everything about me in the public eye, so maybe I’m just used to it, but we all know the vast majority the people who make up the assholes of the Internet wouldn’t act like that if they actually had to associate their name with their commentary. I’ve taken a smug satisfaction from the outing of racists on Twitter, situations where users apparently forgot they weren’t anonymous. In a Facebook world, I wonder if anonymity on the Internet is a dying idea, an idea eventually swept away by the courts.

New government proposals say victims have a right to know who is behind malicious messages without the need for costly legal battles. The powers will be balanced by measures to prevent false claims in order to get material removed. But privacy advocates are worried websites might end up divulging user details in a wider range of cases. Last week, a British woman won a court order forcing Facebook to identify users who had harassed her. Nicola Brookes had been falsely branded a paedophile and drug dealer by users - known as trolls - on Facebook. Facebook, which did not contest the order, will now reveal the IP addresses of people who had abused her so she can prosecute them.

The past has lessons, and I’m glad Michael Abbott is here to tell us about them. Video games are not the first medium to experience a glut of sameness, and while the “I’m tired of shooters” meme seems to rear its head every E3, that criticism felt especially poignant this year. I’m not tired of shooters, I’m just tired of these shooters, and Abbott found an analogy with the western genre in film. For more than a decade, the western dominated the cinematic landscape, and disappeared for a few key reasons: “1) Genre fatigue and homologous products; 2) High cost of production; 3) Public outcry over violence; 4) Narrow target audience.” Sounds awfully familiar, huh?

History could prove prophetic. The second wave of Western filmmakers (Sergio Leone, Sam Peckinpah, Clint Eastwood) turned our deep familiarity with the genre in on itself, addressing existential questions and examining the nature of violence. These films were radical departures from the Hollywood formula, not because they rejected the familiar settings or the guns or the hero/villain dichotomy, but because they made these the very subjects of their scrutiny.

Oh, And This Other Stuff:

Staff
#1 Posted by patrickklepek (3464 posts) -
This was my face around 1:00 am last night, as the credits finally rolled on Amnesia.

It’s with a huge sigh of relief that I’m able to announce that I’ve finished Amnesia: The Dark Descent. The game had such a profound emotional impact on my psyche that I’m going to table most of my thoughts until I’m able to write them down for a separate story next week, but a great weight has been lifted off of me.

Naturally, a teaser for Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs was released today. The nightmare begins anew!

I’m guessing the next Amnesia will conveniently arrive for Halloween, but before then, I’m trying to fill in my own horror gaps. I’ve never played Eternal Darkness (I know, I know), so a copy of that is coming via eBay next week, and I’ve had a few recommendations to play Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth.

There’s also the other games from Amensia developer Frictional Games, the Penumbra series. All of them were on sale recently, so even if they don’t live up to the hype of Amnesia, I’m curious to track the evolution of that studio in reverse. I know they have combat, which sounds iiiiinteresting? Dipping into Penumbra lines up with my desire to play the deeply flawed I Am Alive this week. I Am Alive isn’t a good game, but we can learn much from bad games.

Are there any not-so-great games that you’ve been able to appreciate, for one reason or another? Chime in.

Hey, You Should Play This:

You might remember Cipher Prime's Auditorium Duet as one of the few Kickstarter projects I’ve highlighted on Giant Bomb. I wrote about it because it seemed likely to not get funded, but in the final hours, it did. This is not about another foray onto Kickstarter for Cipher Prime, but another game that’s absolutely worth your attention: Splice. It doesn’t have anything to do with the just okay 2009 horror film, but they do have a common theme. In both the movie and the game, it’s all about genetic manipulation. In one case, you’re left with a horrifying creature, but in Cipher Prime’s game, there’s a serene, relaxing puzzle game. Players are tasked with dragging and manipulating microbe sequences to line up with a set of patterns, and the sequences become understandably more complicated. It’s rather beautiful, too. We’ll do a Quick Look of this next week, but I wanted to give you guys a heads up for the weekend.

And You Should Read These, Too:

Given the response to Anita Sarkeesian’s Kickstarter, I’m torn on the anonymity question. Imagine what would have happened if Blizzard had gone through with its plan to out everyone on its message boards? The benefits of anonymity are clear, but are the consequences worth it? I’m used to having everything about me in the public eye, so maybe I’m just used to it, but we all know the vast majority the people who make up the assholes of the Internet wouldn’t act like that if they actually had to associate their name with their commentary. I’ve taken a smug satisfaction from the outing of racists on Twitter, situations where users apparently forgot they weren’t anonymous. In a Facebook world, I wonder if anonymity on the Internet is a dying idea, an idea eventually swept away by the courts.

New government proposals say victims have a right to know who is behind malicious messages without the need for costly legal battles. The powers will be balanced by measures to prevent false claims in order to get material removed. But privacy advocates are worried websites might end up divulging user details in a wider range of cases. Last week, a British woman won a court order forcing Facebook to identify users who had harassed her. Nicola Brookes had been falsely branded a paedophile and drug dealer by users - known as trolls - on Facebook. Facebook, which did not contest the order, will now reveal the IP addresses of people who had abused her so she can prosecute them.

The past has lessons, and I’m glad Michael Abbott is here to tell us about them. Video games are not the first medium to experience a glut of sameness, and while the “I’m tired of shooters” meme seems to rear its head every E3, that criticism felt especially poignant this year. I’m not tired of shooters, I’m just tired of these shooters, and Abbott found an analogy with the western genre in film. For more than a decade, the western dominated the cinematic landscape, and disappeared for a few key reasons: “1) Genre fatigue and homologous products; 2) High cost of production; 3) Public outcry over violence; 4) Narrow target audience.” Sounds awfully familiar, huh?

History could prove prophetic. The second wave of Western filmmakers (Sergio Leone, Sam Peckinpah, Clint Eastwood) turned our deep familiarity with the genre in on itself, addressing existential questions and examining the nature of violence. These films were radical departures from the Hollywood formula, not because they rejected the familiar settings or the guns or the hero/villain dichotomy, but because they made these the very subjects of their scrutiny.

Oh, And This Other Stuff:

Staff
#2 Posted by mnzy (2911 posts) -
#3 Posted by MooseyMcMan (10463 posts) -

I really should play Amnesia at some point, just to see how "scary" it is. No game has ever come even remotely close to seeming "scary" to me, so I'd like to be able to topple this game. Too bad my computer is garbage for playing games.

But, as usual, a nice write up, Patrick. Keep up the good work!

#4 Posted by Video_Game_King (35978 posts) -

@patrickklepek said:

Video games are not the first medium to experience a glut of sameness, and while the “I’m tired of shooters” meme seems to rear its head every E3, that criticism felt especially poignant this year.

And I was there to yell things like "so what if they're the same, you guys" and "YOU BROUGHT THIS UPON YOURSELVES!!!".

Online
#5 Posted by HadesTimes (802 posts) -

I just bought Amnesia in a Indie Bundle, I guess I will be playing it sooner than I originally thought. You've inspired me Patrick.

#6 Posted by Subject2Change (2966 posts) -

I still need to play Dark Descent, as well as i've had a copy of Eternal Darkness for a while now; perhaps when my girlfriend gives me back my GameCube memory card i'll have to give it a shot.

#7 Posted by Toxeia (728 posts) -

I wouldn't dare eat a pizza made by a machine. The leavening is instant? Bullshit. A proper dough needs to rise. I understand it's a compromise so that it's a vending machine that makes pizza but it's too far for me.

Now if you don't mind, I'm going to go hand make a pizza myself from scratch and then laugh at my roomba because it could never hope to make pizza as delicious as I can.

#8 Posted by rachelepithet (1345 posts) -

Why do hackers deserve anonymity when their victims don't? While not every Internet addict women hater out there contributed to stealing the social security number of this kick-starter lady, or

#9 Posted by Paul_Str337 (11 posts) -

I got Amnesia: The Dark Decent with the latest Humble Indie Bundle but doubt I'll ever play it. I jump at scary films easily enough and I'm worse with scary games. The last one I tried was Resident Evil Code Veronica back on Dreamcast which I don't think is even considered one of the scary ones but it was enough to put me off things like it for life...

#10 Posted by CaLe (3910 posts) -
#11 Posted by wemibelec90 (1544 posts) -

Man, I'm so jealous of Patrick for getting to play Eternal Darkness. I've wanted to play that game for SO LONG but I'm not willing to track down a copy, and a Gamecube, in order to play that one game.

Silicon Knights, you are in desperate need of capital. Re-release this game now!

#12 Posted by MikeW1980UK (68 posts) -

I'm sorry but Amnesia is not that scary a game. The closest it comes is the jail level.

Don't get me wrong, i liked the game a lot when playing it, but people almost dying from freight playing it is daft. The first thing I done was get killed by the first monster I could. After that the game I played was finding out why Daniel had amnesia (a damn good story I thought too).

Rant over.

#13 Posted by rachelepithet (1345 posts) -

... (sorry, iPad doesn't allow editing) ----------__________ Not every neo nazi libertarian hacker on the web contributed to posting her home address or even threatening to rape her children.... But, they support the movement, they identify as a clique, a club, a band, a brotherhood with those men. At he very least they turn a blind eye to it. I hate those people worse. To believe in something so pathetic and have the cowardice to not go "all the way" is just the worst. ----------__________ Anybody else agree? That the type of person who clinches their purse when standing next to an African on an elevator is a million times worse than the deranged conspiracy theorist geocities blogger that writes in all caps THOSE PORCH MONKEYS WERE SENT BY SATAN TO TAKE OIR JOBS AND BLAH BLAH BLAH. Those people are crazy. A person that tells a woman he will rape her baby because she said Star Wars isnt her favorite movie is crazy. Whats mind boggling to me are the normals. The sane people who still harbor weird archaic almost OCD feelings about race sex religion age beauty.

#14 Posted by Mento (2438 posts) -

I was thinking how much I'd love to see a feature involving you and maybe someone else playing some Eternal Darkness, preferably on a blind run. But then I recalled a certain other horror-themed series this website used to have and felt a little sad.

That said, "'Trick or Treat" might be a better name for a (creature) feature than "Fear Gauntlet". Sorry and

Regarding the question you posed, I was able to appreciate Dragon Quarter's bizarre reset gimmick despite how agitated it must've made any normal person, especially any normal person who enjoyed the otherwise straightforward Breath of Fire games previous to that one. Of course, I disliked the mechanically similar Dead Rising, so maybe I'm fickle. Or I just like dragons more than zombies. Who can say?

Moderator
#15 Posted by obonicus (17 posts) -

Frankly, the Abbott article is terrible. It's an opinion piece masquerading as some sort of industry insight. If there really is genre fatigue, point it out. And how exactly is targeting the CoD audience going for a 'Narrow target audience'? As compared to what, Angry Birds?

In the end it comes out to a 'I don't like the MP3 gameplay' anecdote, and then behaving as if his opinion is widely held.

#16 Posted by Galiant (2178 posts) -

@MikeW1980UK said:

but people almost dying from freight playing it is daft.

I played it alone in my apartment, at night, with headphones. I was scared, and I am not "daft". Who are you trying to impress?

#17 Edited by Tennmuerti (7997 posts) -

I'm a type of person who likes to stand by shit they said (maybe even love to a fault). So the anonymity issue is to me a non issue. That said it's a shitty dark road Brittain has been heading down regarding it's laws and this is just another little brick.

Also the BBC article title reeks of tabloid journalism approach of misrepresenting the actual events on purpose. "Trolls" of the internet don't have much to do with this, it's a huuuge spectrum of which this law is targeting a tiny amount. Personal harasment of an individual and actual defamation is a whole other ballpark. If the person who was getting harassed was likewise anonymous it would be impossible to claim defamation in the first place, for example.

#18 Posted by Mustachio (242 posts) -

There's something really scary about the whole identifying 'trolls' thing. Where is the line between a troll and a person putting forth an argument? Could people use this as a weapon to simply silence others they don't agree with? Will websites simply give up the personal information of any individual at the first sign of a possible court case? I'm not saying racists and bigots should be defended, I'm just saying the ramifications of this stuff could be bigger than the initial scope. Big Brother and all that.

#19 Posted by Pat (70 posts) -

When are you going to start a feature about these older games you didn't at their release but are getting to years down the line?

#20 Posted by AssInAss (2541 posts) -

Michael Abbott always brings the goods, you guys should get him for a GDC podcast.

Resonance will have Bastion's narrator (Logan Cunningham)?! This has been a good year for adventure games with The Walking Dead, and Botanicula.

#21 Posted by ArclightBorealis (1563 posts) -

I am jealous that Patrick will most likely get to play Eternal Darkness before I do. Really want to play that game, even though I'm not a big horror guy.

#22 Posted by hanktherapper (374 posts) -

I saw Splice on Steam and was wondering if it was good. I'll check it out. Amnesia: The Dark Descent was too scary for me and that was only after an hour of gameplay.

#23 Edited by SaturdayNightSpecials (2308 posts) -

I don't believe Warren Spector has any authority to declare that "we" should stop loving violence.

I too would like to see more thoughtful uses of violence in games. I also enjoy some well-done gore for its own sake. I don't think that makes me maladjusted or immature, but if Spector does then he's perfectly free not to employ that kind of violence in his games. Just as Sony is perfectly free to give people shotgun blasts to the face and elephant brains if they enjoy those things. There's plenty of room for both approaches, even if the AAA realm embraces one more than the other.

#24 Posted by Bourbon_Warrior (4523 posts) -

@Galiant said:

@MikeW1980UK said:

but people almost dying from freight playing it is daft.

I played it alone in my apartment, at night, with headphones. I was scared, and I am not "daft". Who are you trying to impress?

Can't find the original post but he said, he went out of his way to die from the first monster. Doesnt that ruin the horror element if you just go and die straight away, the horror is about getting away.

#25 Posted by LordCmdrStryker (346 posts) -

said:

"We all know the vast majority the people who make up the assholes of the Internet wouldn’t act like that if they actually had to associate their name with their commentary."

We all know that, do we? That's a real dangerous assumption to make. I hope to God we can keep this far away from the law over here. They've already got CCTV cameras on every corner in the UK, which is plenty bad enough. They don't have a Bill of Rights, so their piece of shit Big Brother government can get away with just doing what it wants. And you'd think that something like this would be a rather obvious First Amendment violation, but seeing how many senators and congressmen are bitching about "cyberbullying" and other crap they don't understand, I wouldn't be surprised if they made a real concerted effort to actually make saying things on the internet illegal. When that Godforsaken day comes, I can only hope that the Supreme Court has the stones to strike it down.

#26 Posted by liako21 (519 posts) -

gemini rue was kray so i think im gonna have to check out resonance.

#27 Posted by Seeric (138 posts) -

For the question concerning a not-so-great game that I can appreciate, I would have to say Chakan on the Genesis ranks up there. It has memorable music and graphics, an interesting protagonist and basic plot, an alchemy system, stage select, multiple weapons, and a pretty diverse moveset for the time. Unfortunately, horribly level design, long invulnerability times for enemies, and a bunch of smaller issues all make it far from the game that I wish it was and really makes it the perfect example of interesting and innovative gimmicks being brought down by a lack of polish.

Stretch Panic is a very close second as it really feels like a game that suffers from not being given enough love and even more for being ahead of its time. It would be an amazing game if only it had actual levels (it has 12 bosses and 4 mostly optional mini-areas) and was made in this post-motion control era instead of back on the PS2.

The whole identifying trolls thing is really just an awful idea. Most 'trolls' would either be too young for the law to do much to them or smart enough to easily circumvent such systems. Not to mention, it would just lead to a new, potentially dangerous form of trolling where real trolls mass-report others for trolling to make innocents become labelled as trolls and get their personal information leaked.

Really, if this is such a big issue, it would be a lot easier to educate people on how to block and/or report harassers, to encourage (not force) websites to put more resources towards preventing multiaccounts, and for everyone to take a hint from Adventure Time's Magic Man and learn that, yes, some people are simply jerks and it's best to just ignore them and move on.

#28 Posted by bunnymud (717 posts) -

Needs more titties

#29 Posted by Sapp (17 posts) -

Avencast is a flawed yet interesting action RPG. I loved the combat system but it didn't keep me interested enough to see the whole game through,

#30 Posted by CilliaBlack (38 posts) -

Eternal Darkness is one of my absolute favorite games of all time, but it isn't particularly scary. The game is home to probably the single best jump scare of all time (not even the dogs in RE are as good in my opinion), but other than that it just never got under my skin.

I found the Lovecraftian setting, characters and overall story to be highly appealing, and got a lot of kicks out of the gameplay as well. I've got no idea how well that gameplay would hold up now if I tried to play it, but back when the gamecube was still current, it was one of the very few games I replayed enough to get every secret.

Fantastic game, all told, but It never managed to really scare me.

#31 Posted by Anwar (844 posts) -

Not everything is a meme or trolling, stop making words meaningless please.

I haven’t read this Gamasutra feature on the neuroscience of scary games, but it sounds awesome.

And I just love that something called Worth Reading is not worth reading for the creator of Worth Reading, just fucking asinine.

#32 Posted by ArbitraryWater (11462 posts) -

@Alaska_Gamer said:

I am jealous that Patrick will most likely get to play Eternal Darkness before I do. Really want to play that game, even though I'm not a big horror guy.

I played it like 2 years ago and honestly didn't think all that much of it. It's a decent enough action/adventure game with a sanity gimmick that is worn out the second you get the "restore sanity" spell. Obviously, I was playing it 9 years after the fact, but it's one of those games that I don't entirely understand the praise for.

#33 Posted by patrickklepek (3464 posts) -

@Anwar said:

Not everything is a meme or trolling, stop making words meaningless please.

I haven’t read this Gamasutra feature on the neuroscience of scary games, but it sounds awesome.

And I just love that something called Worth Reading is not worth reading for the creator of Worth Reading, just fucking asinine.

The point of the bullet points is stuff I have't had a chance to fully check out myself, but comes from sources I trust.

Staff
#34 Posted by feargalr (55 posts) -

As a microbiologist, and a bioinformatician, splice excites me.

#35 Posted by cooljammer00 (1528 posts) -

Alpha Protocol. Loved it, deeply flawed.

#36 Posted by dr_mantas (1789 posts) -

Anonymity on the internet is essential. It's the last bastion for free speech and against government oppression in modern times, now that we can't really have an open armed revolt anymore. Look at Russia, and all the anti-government protests organized through social media. Same with the protests in Arab countries.

I'll take the upside of free speech with the downside of some people being called bad names, thank you.

#37 Posted by Sabata (823 posts) -

Holy shit that pizza vending machine is amazing.

#38 Edited by XeroxPunk (23 posts) -

@ArbitraryWater said:

@Alaska_Gamer said:

I am jealous that Patrick will most likely get to play Eternal Darkness before I do. Really want to play that game, even though I'm not a big horror guy.

I played it like 2 years ago and honestly didn't think all that much of it. It's a decent enough action/adventure game with a sanity gimmick that is worn out the second you get the "restore sanity" spell. Obviously, I was playing it 9 years after the fact, but it's one of those games that I don't entirely understand the praise for.

I completely agree. It's one of those games I wish I had played on a higher difficulty to truly experience what they had to offer. If you are remotely good at the Resident Evil style gameplay, you won't see many of the sanity effects at all.

I would compare it to the combat in Alan Wake and Dead Space. If you're not continually looking behind you in a state of terror over what you might find, you need to bump up the difficulty to get the full experience.

Edit: I played it in 2006.

#39 Posted by BlazeHedgehog (1082 posts) -

With so many websites simply adopting Facebook for their comments section one could argue that anonymity on certain parts of the internet is gone, or at least reduced. Seeing a Facebook widget has definitely made me think twice about writing comments, even positive ones, because I'd rather avoid broadcasting to my whole family that I was looking for a realistic weapon pack for Garry's Mod or whatever.

#40 Posted by morecowbell24 (100 posts) -

I tried moving on to Silent Hill 2 after beating Amnesia. Even several months later, coupled with a craving to feel what The Dark Descent made me feel, I couldn't get very far before I had to stop. It wasn't because Silent Hill 2 was more unsettling, but because the feelings of horror Amnesia had affected me to such a degree that I just couldn't handle it. Amnesia was traumatic for me.

Finally a year and half after trying Silent Hill 2, I too, am going to give Eternal Darkness a whirl. If that goes well, maybe I'll go back the Silent Hill.

#41 Posted by blacklab (1524 posts) -

Bill Simmons...oh good lord

#42 Posted by jsobral (2 posts) -

Great article!

#43 Posted by YummyTreeSap (304 posts) -

I need to finish Amnesia some time. I really liked what I played of it, but like I am with many games, I never finished it and it's since gotten buried beneath my massive backlog of games that I get from Steam sales and indie bundles and the like.

I played the Splice demo and was rather pleased. In terms of A/V design, it's superb: the music is excellent and it looks immensely pretty. Awesome job. The game itself was pretty neat, but I am wary that it might overstay its welcome for me, something that puzzle games often do. One thing worth commenting on is that the way the game presents itself is actually somewhat of a rarity these days. That is, it explicitly explains pretty much none of the core game mechanics. There is maybe two pages of relatively cryptic help, but there is no tutorial to hit you over the head with an overload of game mechanic information, etc. The player is left to intuit for himself how the game works. I am quite fond of this approach.

#44 Posted by Blackout62 (1328 posts) -

I want the pizza vending machine. Don't tell the foodies.

#45 Posted by kre8havoc (173 posts) -

@MooseyMcMan said:

I really should play Amnesia at some point, just to see how "scary" it is. No game has ever come even remotely close to seeming "scary" to me, so I'd like to be able to topple this game. Too bad my computer is garbage for playing games.

But, as usual, a nice write up, Patrick. Keep up the good work!

I've been the same way about scary games. But I think you should at least give it a shot. It's more tense than scary, and it was the first game I have ever played that was made me feel that way. Just set yourself up for "success", play it in the dark with good headphones/loud speakers!

#46 Posted by EvilKatarn (465 posts) -
#47 Posted by hoossy (932 posts) -

Thanks for the article Patrick Klepek.

It made my penis hide up inside my body... and made my stomach want some robot pizza.

#48 Posted by Fattony12000 (7034 posts) -

@CilliaBlack: @ArbitraryWater: @Sabata: @XeroxPunk: @hoossy: Antorbok Redgormor Pargon Pargon Pargon Mantorok Pargon.

MAY THE RATS EAT YOUR EYES!

#49 Posted by jakonovski (197 posts) -

Eternal Darkness and CoC:DCotE? There needs to be video content on those. Quick Look Throwback, something. The masses must be educated on Lovecraftian horror.

#50 Posted by DeF (4799 posts) -

if you're gonna play Eternal Darkness anyway, why not turn that into some kind of [ryandavis]"video thing"[/ryandavis] for the site? I vaguely remember Vinny saying during one of the Load Our Last Save episodes that he wanted to check in with some GameCube games like Eternal Darkness. Maybe after you've played ED you could sit in on that or something.

A little more retro video love :D