#1 Edited by OldManLight (905 posts) -

I'm completely new to TCGs so i read up a bit and 2 common TCG concepts helped me out toward winning the majority of my games i play lately even with the default decks.

Card Advantage - Simply put was explained to me the total number of cards you have either in play or in your hand at a given time, keeping this number above your opponent's can greatly increase your chances of winning as you simply have more options and you're forcing them into a bad spot where they simply don't have as many strategic options as you do. Trying to coax out your opponent's more useful cards spell and taunt cards early in the game without expending your own cards can be of great use later on.

Tempo - Basically is picking your moment and controlling the escalation of the board. If you can take out some potentially dangerous cards using fewer cards than what your enemy played, you can turn a dangerous position into an advantageous one. Also, it's important to not "shoot your wad" all at once. Unless you're certain you can win the game in your next turn, you should avoid going all in because once you do, if your opponent counters, you're left with nothing.

Hope this helps.

#2 Posted by Blargonaut (153 posts) -

Another important tip: You really need to get a feel for all the classes and what their capabilities are. That way you can get an idea of what they might play on certain turns. Example: Mages can play a spell called Flamestrike on turn 7 (or 6 if they have a Sorcerer's Apprentice out!) that does 4 damage to all your minions. So in that case you may want to hold off putting more minions onto the board that have 4 or less health, in order to avoid this. Keep in mind though that there are many variations of decks for each class that can run very different cards .

#3 Posted by EdgeKasey (141 posts) -

Another important tip: You really need to get a feel for all the classes and what their capabilities are. That way you can get an idea of what they might play on certain turns. Example: Mages can play a spell called Flamestrike on turn 7 (or 6 if they have a Sorcerer's Apprentice out!) that does 4 damage to all your minions. So in that case you may want to hold off putting more minions onto the board that have 4 or less health, in order to avoid this. Keep in mind though that there are many variations of decks for each class that can run very different cards .

This. Example: If I play against a mage and he's played 2 polymorphs already, that completely opens up new plays for me knowing they aren't out there. I've been going through all the characters trying to get them all to at least 10 so I can have a feel for their basic decks....that has helped me a wee bit. :)

#4 Posted by meteora3255 (137 posts) -

I think one of the hardest concepts for my friends when they first started playing games like this and Magic was creature/minion attachment. There is a tendency, in my experience, among newer players to treat every creature like their own child. That means they will do anything to save it even when said creature isn't worth anything in the long run. Knowing when to sacrifice a minion is just as important as knowing when to save one.

Another thing that I have found useful is not being super conservative with the Coin. A lot of new players treat the Coin like its something they need to save for as long as possible and in many cases the game is almost decided by the time they use it. There is nothing wrong with using the Coin early to gain the ability to play a card if that card is going to give you a strong board position at that moment.

#5 Posted by Blargonaut (153 posts) -

Another thing that I have found useful is not being super conservative with the Coin. A lot of new players treat the Coin like its something they need to save for as long as possible and in many cases the game is almost decided by the time they use it. There is nothing wrong with using the Coin early to gain the ability to play a card if that card is going to give you a strong board position at that moment.

Yeah you should use the coin fairly early on. Basically take a look at the cards you have after mulliganing (which is the initial phase where you can decide if you like the cards given to your or not and swap them out) and determine what the best use of the coin might be in your matchup.

#6 Edited by animathias (1194 posts) -

Card Advantage - Simply put was explained to me the total number of cards you have either in play or in your hand at a given time, keeping this number above your opponent's can greatly increase your chances of winning as you simply have more options and you're forcing them into a bad spot where they simply don't have as many strategic options as you do. Trying to coax out your opponent's more useful cards spell and taunt cards early in the game without expending your own cards can be of great use later on.

Good tips! As far as card advantage goes, trading is a term to remember. When a creature you control dies killing an enemy, you just did a straight trade. If you can force your opponent to use a spell or or a second creature to remove one of yours, you just gained an advantage. It's also good to keep this in mind so you don't give up advantage where you don't need to. Piling 3 cards on one to take it down is usually a bad idea - but like all card games, sometimes necessary.