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#1 Edited by TimesHero (680 posts) -

I bought it thinking it would be great a great party multiplier should the time come however, Jeff made it look too fun and easy. My friends and I got big into Dead or Alive 4 back in the day thanks to the fluidity of its combo system. Killer Instinct has a very tough learning curve, and Is not as approachable as Jeff made it look. After the last few days with it, I don't think I'll ever be able to crack it.

Thanks Jeff.

Online
#2 Edited by Yummylee (21547 posts) -

Have you tried the tutorial? It's one aspect that has been consistently praised by Jeff in particular, whom I'm sure spent his time going through that to (in part) get as good as he is now.

#3 Posted by ArtisanBreads (3804 posts) -

THANKS JEFF.

Start playing it badly no one will complain then.

#4 Posted by xyzygy (9953 posts) -

You should try the tutorials. Don't have the game myself but it is universally praised by everyone at how effective it is.

#5 Posted by GERALTITUDE (3229 posts) -

It's hard to go from DOA to pretty much any fighting game in terms of fluidity. It's the only system I know where pretty much every move can be linked/combo'd into every other move, though, if memory serves me right, DOA4 is less fluid than DOA2, which was so fluid it basically didn't matter at all what you pressed.

Last few days?

Duder. Fighting games take time to learn. You need to sit with a buddy, or the AI, and just play. Do it every day for an hour and in two weeks you'll be in a whole new world. DOA has spoiled you!

#6 Posted by e30bmw (356 posts) -

Why didn't you try the free character before buying it?

#7 Posted by csl316 (8472 posts) -

Just play with your friends and hope they're on the same skill level as you.

Back in our peak Tekken days, we played a ton and were amazing. And then I learned about things like EVO and realized we weren't amazing. But we were on a similar skill level and that's all that mattered.

Don't try to compare yourself to Jeff, he's a professional gamer.

#8 Posted by 49th (2734 posts) -

The same thing happened to me with Street Fighter. I had watched a few streams here and thought it looked fun, turns out I can barely do a 3-hit combo.

#9 Posted by Jimbo (9804 posts) -

Thanks Jeff.

#10 Posted by Humanity (9062 posts) -

@49th said:

The same thing happened to me with Street Fighter. I had watched a few streams here and thought it looked fun, turns out I can barely do a 3-hit combo.

Oh man well Street Fighter is nearly impenetrable to outsiders at this point. If you're new to fighting games then forget it - the series has combos and game mechanics that have carried over from game to game over the past decade and are privy only to those who have played for as long. I made the same mistake with Street Fighter X Tekken, wanting to get into the series and fighting games in general, - especially since everyone bemoaned it for being really dumbed down. Well I still struggled with crossups, overheads, cancels, frame traps, just-frames or whatever it's called.. at some point I conceded that I'm simply not a fighting game type of person and will have to settle for admiring the games from afar.

#11 Posted by Shortbreadtom (762 posts) -

I'm bad at this.

Thanks, Jeff.

#12 Posted by Baillie (4081 posts) -

Fast & Furious: Tokyo Drift is a movie I have still never watched.

Thanks Jeff.

#13 Posted by Nefarious_Al (133 posts) -

Fighting games take time to learn if you want to do anything beyond button mashing. Give is time it is not the genre for instant gratification.

#14 Edited by SMTDante89 (2567 posts) -

I completely avoided Skylanders but fell into Disney Infinity really hard.

Thanks, Jeff.

#15 Posted by RazielCuts (2952 posts) -

(I really want 'Thanks, Jeff' to be the new 'Thanks, Obama', on these forums anyway, make it so people!)

You introduced Windjammers into my life and I have no way of playing it!

Thanks, Jeff.

#16 Edited by TimesHero (680 posts) -

@xyzygy: I have. And I've hit a road block on the 8th one I believe. Where you have to... "Shroiuken" the jumping attack? I don't want to move forward until I can figure out what its trying to teach me.

Online
#17 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@humanity said:

@49th said:

The same thing happened to me with Street Fighter. I had watched a few streams here and thought it looked fun, turns out I can barely do a 3-hit combo.

Oh man well Street Fighter is nearly impenetrable to outsiders at this point. If you're new to fighting games then forget it - the series has combos and game mechanics that have carried over from game to game over the past decade and are privy only to those who have played for as long. I made the same mistake with Street Fighter X Tekken, wanting to get into the series and fighting games in general, - especially since everyone bemoaned it for being really dumbed down. Well I still struggled with crossups, overheads, cancels, frame traps, just-frames or whatever it's called.. at some point I conceded that I'm simply not a fighting game type of person and will have to settle for admiring the games from afar.

As someone that was new to fighting games (more or less) and started with Street Fighter IV, I have to call bullshit here. It's nowhere near as hard as people make out and you do not need to know anything about frame traps or frames when starting out.

Especially SFIV, which is far more accessible than Third Strike and Super Turbo, pretty simple combos in those games are far harder in comparison to SFIV.

Fighting games scare people because they are more intimidating online (it's your fault you suck) and they seem super in-depth, but really you have to remember almost just as much in many RPGs.

Killer Instinct in particular is very basic in comparison to SFIV too, so I don't think anyone should be concerned.

#18 Posted by Brendan (7777 posts) -

Heart a little heavy this holiday weekend?

#thanksjeff

#19 Posted by Humanity (9062 posts) -

@sooty: it's not as simple as hey if you suck you do bad online. Unless you have some friends that want to come over and play on the couch then you have to play online - and online is brutal for newcomers where you often don't come out of a fight with anymore knowledge than when you came in. It's certainly not bullshit, it's hard to get into.

#20 Posted by McGhee (6094 posts) -

Suck it up and put some effort into it.

#21 Edited by BisonHero (6452 posts) -

Zillion isn't THAT good. I've been lied to.

Thanks, Jeff.

#22 Edited by JackSukeru (5910 posts) -

Hey Jeff!

Thank you.

#23 Edited by Carryboy (648 posts) -

@sooty said:

@humanity said:

@49th said:

The same thing happened to me with Street Fighter. I had watched a few streams here and thought it looked fun, turns out I can barely do a 3-hit combo.

Oh man well Street Fighter is nearly impenetrable to outsiders at this point. If you're new to fighting games then forget it - the series has combos and game mechanics that have carried over from game to game over the past decade and are privy only to those who have played for as long. I made the same mistake with Street Fighter X Tekken, wanting to get into the series and fighting games in general, - especially since everyone bemoaned it for being really dumbed down. Well I still struggled with crossups, overheads, cancels, frame traps, just-frames or whatever it's called.. at some point I conceded that I'm simply not a fighting game type of person and will have to settle for admiring the games from afar.

As someone that was new to fighting games (more or less) and started with Street Fighter IV, I have to call bullshit here. It's nowhere near as hard as people make out and you do not need to know anything about frame traps or frames when starting out.

Especially SFIV, which is far more accessible than Third Strike and Super Turbo, pretty simple combos in those games are far harder in comparison to SFIV.

Fighting games scare people because they are more intimidating online (it's your fault you suck) and they seem super in-depth, but really you have to remember almost just as much in many RPGs.

Killer Instinct in particular is very basic in comparison to SFIV too, so I don't think anyone should be concerned.

Yeh got to agree with this for the most point KI is pretty mindless fun but it is very basic and whilst it does have some nuance to it, it really is'isn't required to either be competitive or have fun with it.

Online
#24 Posted by punkxblaze (2972 posts) -

THANKS OBAMA.

Wait, I think I did it wrong.

#25 Posted by Crysack (302 posts) -

@sooty said:

@humanity said:

@49th said:

The same thing happened to me with Street Fighter. I had watched a few streams here and thought it looked fun, turns out I can barely do a 3-hit combo.

Oh man well Street Fighter is nearly impenetrable to outsiders at this point. If you're new to fighting games then forget it - the series has combos and game mechanics that have carried over from game to game over the past decade and are privy only to those who have played for as long. I made the same mistake with Street Fighter X Tekken, wanting to get into the series and fighting games in general, - especially since everyone bemoaned it for being really dumbed down. Well I still struggled with crossups, overheads, cancels, frame traps, just-frames or whatever it's called.. at some point I conceded that I'm simply not a fighting game type of person and will have to settle for admiring the games from afar.

As someone that was new to fighting games (more or less) and started with Street Fighter IV, I have to call bullshit here. It's nowhere near as hard as people make out and you do not need to know anything about frame traps or frames when starting out.

Especially SFIV, which is far more accessible than Third Strike and Super Turbo, pretty simple combos in those games are far harder in comparison to SFIV.

Fighting games scare people because they are more intimidating online (it's your fault you suck) and they seem super in-depth, but really you have to remember almost just as much in many RPGs.

Killer Instinct in particular is very basic in comparison to SFIV too, so I don't think anyone should be concerned.

I agree almost entirely. If you're looking for a series that is almost impenetrable at this point, you'd have to look towards something like Tekken, VF, GG etc. The former, in particular, has tons of bizarre execution-heavy mechanics that are essential for any decent level of play and are well known by vets but aren't mentioned in any tutorial.

#26 Edited by President_Barackbar (3455 posts) -

@mcghee said:

Suck it up and put some effort into it.

Comments like this make me truly appreciate the fighting game community. Have fun alienating everyone all over again!

#27 Posted by ikilledthedj (279 posts) -

Jeff is a professionalvidjagamesman thus he is good at games and makes everything look simple thats why he is a professional and you sir are not

#28 Posted by Zeik (2390 posts) -

@crysack said:

@sooty said:

@humanity said:

@49th said:

The same thing happened to me with Street Fighter. I had watched a few streams here and thought it looked fun, turns out I can barely do a 3-hit combo.

Oh man well Street Fighter is nearly impenetrable to outsiders at this point. If you're new to fighting games then forget it - the series has combos and game mechanics that have carried over from game to game over the past decade and are privy only to those who have played for as long. I made the same mistake with Street Fighter X Tekken, wanting to get into the series and fighting games in general, - especially since everyone bemoaned it for being really dumbed down. Well I still struggled with crossups, overheads, cancels, frame traps, just-frames or whatever it's called.. at some point I conceded that I'm simply not a fighting game type of person and will have to settle for admiring the games from afar.

As someone that was new to fighting games (more or less) and started with Street Fighter IV, I have to call bullshit here. It's nowhere near as hard as people make out and you do not need to know anything about frame traps or frames when starting out.

Especially SFIV, which is far more accessible than Third Strike and Super Turbo, pretty simple combos in those games are far harder in comparison to SFIV.

Fighting games scare people because they are more intimidating online (it's your fault you suck) and they seem super in-depth, but really you have to remember almost just as much in many RPGs.

Killer Instinct in particular is very basic in comparison to SFIV too, so I don't think anyone should be concerned.

I agree almost entirely. If you're looking for a series that is almost impenetrable at this point, you'd have to look towards something like Tekken, VF, GG etc. The former, in particular, has tons of bizarre execution-heavy mechanics that are essential for any decent level of play and are well known by vets but aren't mentioned in any tutorial.

The real problem with learning fighting games in this day and age is finding people of comparable level to you to face regularly. You can no longer just go down to the arcade and play some casual matches. If you don't have friends playing it at the same time that are learning it at the same rate as you then you have to go online, and it's very hard to find people that aren't pretty serious about the game when you go online. (Especially once you're well past the launch window.)

It's only over the last several years that I started to take fighting games seriously and it was by far the hardest game genre I've ever tried to learn. Possibly because as a 1 on 1 competitive game it's hard to have a satisfactory experience by just being decent.

#29 Edited by Xeiphyer (5602 posts) -

Lol yeah you gotta watch out for Jeff and fighting games. He has a good grasp on general fighting game mechanics so he can pick up those games very quickly and make them look easy.

#30 Posted by slyspider (1211 posts) -

Wait now we hate them because they are good at games? Fuck it sure lets tell them to move out of their mom's basement while we are at it!

#31 Edited by Ravelle (1251 posts) -

Jeff had a 30 something killing streak with Injustice and is unstoppable with Wind Jammers, Jeff's a god and makes everything look easy.

#32 Posted by Crysack (302 posts) -

@mcghee said:

Suck it up and put some effort into it.

Comments like this make me truly appreciate the fighting game community. Have fun alienating everyone all over again!

You don't understand the fighting community particularly well. They don't care if they alienate the general populace.

#33 Edited by ArtisanBreads (3804 posts) -

@crysack said:

@president_barackbar said:

@mcghee said:

Suck it up and put some effort into it.

Comments like this make me truly appreciate the fighting game community. Have fun alienating everyone all over again!

You don't understand the fighting community particularly well. They don't care if they alienate the general populace.

And these developers shouldn't just be targeting "the fighting game community" all the time. They should try to be broader and bring more people in, with single player like Mortal Kombat does and the training modes in this game and ones that Netherealm is doing.

It is annoying when the fighting game community is against good tutorials. It is lame. You should want your game to have as big of an audience as possible.

#34 Edited by BIGJEFFREY (4971 posts) -

Jeff so E-sports son

Online
#35 Posted by Crysack (302 posts) -

@crysack said:

@president_barackbar said:

@mcghee said:

Suck it up and put some effort into it.

Comments like this make me truly appreciate the fighting game community. Have fun alienating everyone all over again!

You don't understand the fighting community particularly well. They don't care if they alienate the general populace.

And these developers shouldn't just be targeting "the fighting game community" all the time. They should try to be broader and bring more people in, with single player like Mortal Kombat does and the training modes in this game and ones that Netherealm is doing.

It is annoying when the fighting game community is against good tutorials. It is lame. You should want your game to have as big of an audience as possible.


Sure, but when they do so, the competitive aspects of the game typically suffer. MK is a prime example and Soul Calibur 3 and 4 both spring to mind as games which targeted casual audiences but were poor competitive fighters.

#36 Edited by ArtisanBreads (3804 posts) -

@crysack said:
@artisanbreads said:

@crysack said:

@president_barackbar said:

@mcghee said:

Suck it up and put some effort into it.

Comments like this make me truly appreciate the fighting game community. Have fun alienating everyone all over again!

You don't understand the fighting community particularly well. They don't care if they alienate the general populace.

And these developers shouldn't just be targeting "the fighting game community" all the time. They should try to be broader and bring more people in, with single player like Mortal Kombat does and the training modes in this game and ones that Netherealm is doing.

It is annoying when the fighting game community is against good tutorials. It is lame. You should want your game to have as big of an audience as possible.

Sure, but when they do so, the competitive aspects of the game typically suffer. MK is a prime example and Soul Calibur 3 and 4 both spring to mind as games which targeted casual audiences but were poor competitive fighters.

Tutorials do not have to interfere with any depth. It isn't a cause of a game being inferior. Even SF IV had better tutorials than previous SF games (if they were still poor tutorials).

The Forza games have been great sims while including assists, a driving line, rewinds, etc. Fighting games are only making baby steps towards doing more tutorial work and there's no reason to say that will ruin the game.

#37 Posted by ripelivejam (3816 posts) -

Online
#38 Posted by Crysack (302 posts) -

@crysack said:
@artisanbreads said:

@crysack said:

@president_barackbar said:

@mcghee said:

Suck it up and put some effort into it.

Comments like this make me truly appreciate the fighting game community. Have fun alienating everyone all over again!

You don't understand the fighting community particularly well. They don't care if they alienate the general populace.

And these developers shouldn't just be targeting "the fighting game community" all the time. They should try to be broader and bring more people in, with single player like Mortal Kombat does and the training modes in this game and ones that Netherealm is doing.

It is annoying when the fighting game community is against good tutorials. It is lame. You should want your game to have as big of an audience as possible.

Sure, but when they do so, the competitive aspects of the game typically suffer. MK is a prime example and Soul Calibur 3 and 4 both spring to mind as games which targeted casual audiences but were poor competitive fighters.

Tutorials do not have to interfere with any depth. It isn't a cause of a game being inferior. Even SF IV had better tutorials than previous SF games (if they were still poor tutorials).

The Forza games have been great sims while including assists, a driving line, rewinds, etc. Fighting games are only making baby steps towards doing more tutorial work and there's no reason to say that will ruin the game.

Tutorials are one thing, extensive singleplayer content is another. History has only shown us that implementing the latter in fighters tends to take focus away from the core mechanics and we end up with unbalanced or broken games.

All of that being said, I agree that tutorials need to be implemented properly in more series. It seems crazy to me that Tekken still doesn't have a proper movement tutorial all of these years later. The best they could do was Tag 2 where it taught you the basics of punishing and moving backwards and forwards - and that's it.

#39 Posted by GERALTITUDE (3229 posts) -

@humanity said:

@49th said:

The same thing happened to me with Street Fighter. I had watched a few streams here and thought it looked fun, turns out I can barely do a 3-hit combo.

Oh man well Street Fighter is nearly impenetrable to outsiders at this point. If you're new to fighting games then forget it - the series has combos and game mechanics that have carried over from game to game over the past decade and are privy only to those who have played for as long. I made the same mistake with Street Fighter X Tekken, wanting to get into the series and fighting games in general, - especially since everyone bemoaned it for being really dumbed down. Well I still struggled with crossups, overheads, cancels, frame traps, just-frames or whatever it's called.. at some point I conceded that I'm simply not a fighting game type of person and will have to settle for admiring the games from afar.

I'm not so sure this really matters though. You can be as new as a newborn babe. So long as you are playing people your own level, it doesn't really matter how many mechanics they've added over the years. As a lifetime fighting game scrub, I have no clue what a crossup or overhead is. Can't cancel. No clue how to frame trap or count frames or whatever.

Just using the basic buttons and figuring out which lead to combos + knowing a few super moves is all you need to have fun. What you're talking about is high level play, not fighting games. It's like me saying I shouldn't play Dark Souls unless I can beat the game without dieing once. Why measure it like that?

I feel like fighting games and strategy games get a really bad rap because of high level Street Fighter/StarCraft play. Everything at that level represents less than 10% of actual matches happening online. The difficulty with both genres is that everybody has to fail a bunch to get a good. You just have to. It's like riding a bike or whatever nahmean?

#40 Posted by ImmortalSaiyan (4676 posts) -

Here is the skinny. DOA4 is a game that is super easy to pick up as the systems in place are rather flawed and you can just mash the attacks and look cool doing it. There is depth to the triangle system, and that will not work on good players, but that version of the series only has that aspect of play. DOA4 was the first fighting game I learnt how to play too and it is actually a rather poor introduction to the genre on the whole. No other fighter has that level of free form combo to it, where any random hit can lead into a combo, but on that can be broken always.

KI seems to have a similar idea to the combo system of DOA, in that it is lenient what combos into what, and it becomes more about the mental game of mix ups while combos, less about execution. Put it is still in a 2D fighter framework, something that playing DOA will never teach you.

#41 Posted by Zeik (2390 posts) -

@geraltitude said:

Just using the basic buttons and figuring out which lead to combos + knowing a few super moves is all you need to have fun. What you're talking about is high level play, not fighting games. It's like me saying I shouldn't play Dark Souls unless I can beat the game without dieing once. Why measure it like that?

I don't think that's a very good comparison, because the player on player competitive nature of fighting games makes it a very different beast. It would be more like jumping into Dark Souls for the first time where it's all invasions all the time. What you need to learn to beat the AI in Dark Souls is very different from what you need to learn to beat player phantoms, and the latter is a significantly harder thing to accomplish regularly.

#42 Posted by xyzygy (9953 posts) -

If you really want to get into fighting games, I suggest starting with the original BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger. Why? Because then you start at the foundation of a fighting game, and if you want to learn more, you can advance in that series. Along the way you'll learn things universal to fighting games and also specific to the game itself - not to mention that the game is fucking amazing.

#43 Edited by churrific (478 posts) -

@artisanbreads: Just fyi, I've seen an overabundance of self-produced teaching material from the fgc posted all over the internet. There's more than enough fgc ppl trying to compensate for the lack of basic knowledge the games aren't teaching, so I'd just put the blame squarely on the developers for being lazy/and whichever developer (I forget which one) that had the copyright on tutorials that's held them back for so much over the years.

#44 Edited by TheManWithNoPlan (5438 posts) -

That's what happens when it's your job to play video games.

#45 Edited by Hadoken101 (762 posts) -

I never understood why the FGC is singled out as being alienating and it not being worth trying to get into the genre because of how good people online are. In the case of alienation is it because generally people aren't willing to help others learn? Because if you ask a random player in any genre for help, be it FPS, RTS, or MOBA, they probably won't be helpful at all and will probably tell you to fuck off. That doesn't mean that nobody at all wants to help you; there are a number of people who are totally willing to help newer players or players with questions on clarification. Stuff like UltraChen's weekly show talking about different mechanics, or sonichurricane.com's guide on footsies (the fundamental baseline of fighting games) exist for the people who want to learn the genre. It's all just a matter of looking past "random internet asshole" for your information.

On top of this, saying there's no point trying to get into SF because people online are too good just doesn't make sense to me. Any big genre at this point has good players that will destroy you when you first start playing. Is there no point getting into something like CoD (quality aside) because you'll just respawn and get headshot over and over? Is there no point getting into League of Legends or Dota because you just die because you have no idea what different heroes/champions do? Of course not, it's all a matter of learning the game. I'm not saying fighting games are for everyone and every single person should play them (though I'd like that), I'm just saying that it's a little ridiculous to give up on a genre because it doesn't have instant gratification and has a difficult learning curve.

Also on the topic of tutorials. Of course, they can be a lot better at teaching a lot of the less obvious things about fighting games such as crossups or even something like super cancelling. However, a lot of the more high level stuff, things like frame-traps, option selects, or safe jumps, are harder to define in a digestible tutorial and as well, are barely used effectively at most levels other than top tournament play. If you try to teach these high level concepts to a beginner, you end up causing an information overload and actually make the game even harder to start learning.

And to whoever suggested that people actively don't want better tutorials, come on man.... People in the FGC aren't against better tutorials, they just don't care since it doesn't personally impact them or how they play the game since they've learned all that stuff already; same as how people don't care about tutorials in action/adventure games because they already know how to play them.

Online
#46 Posted by xyzygy (9953 posts) -

Also, I'd like to add that I don't think it's a bad thing that this game is hard. That means there is a challenge and I appreciate that.

#47 Posted by Hadoken101 (762 posts) -

@xyzygy: I have. And I've hit a road block on the 8th one I believe. Where you have to... "Shroiuken" the jumping attack? I don't want to move forward until I can figure out what its trying to teach me.

If you're still stuck there, it sounds like it's teaching you to anti-air the opponent with a Shoryuken/Dragon Punch type move, named after Ryu's move and done by doing a forward-down- diagonal down forward motion and a punch. Though I don't have an XOne so I can't actually be sure that's what it's asking. It's pretty much just teaching you how to stop people from jumping at you for free.

Online
#48 Edited by VanillaPlant (146 posts) -

I never understood why the FGC is singled out as being alienating and it not being worth trying to get into the genre because of how good people online are.

It's because fighting games are one of the few types of competitive video games where you can't be carried/blame others for your own shortcomings. This my theory as to why team deathmatch in fps has become the default, while ffa deathmatch and modes with no respawns have been sidelined or even omitted in recent titles. This attitude is especially pronounced in mobas, where every other public game one plays will inevitably have a mediocre player who shit talks the rest of the team when things aren't going well for him. A lot of players don't want to own up to the fact that they lost because they weren't as good as their opponent, they want to be able to blame someone else, and if they can't do that, then they cry about their opponent playing cheap or using a high tier character.

@xyzygy said:

If you really want to get into fighting games, I suggest starting with the original BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger. Why? Because then you start at the foundation of a fighting game, and if you want to learn more, you can advance in that series. Along the way you'll learn things universal to fighting games and also specific to the game itself - not to mention that the game is fucking amazing.

I wouldn't suggest this unless you are interested in the games story. BBCT had no tutorials, it has no online scene, and was also just a bad competitive game in general. If you are interested in learning BB, then pick up Blazblue Chrono Phantasm (BBCP) from japanese playstation store, wait until it gets released in March for NA, or see if you can find Blazblue Continuum Shift Extend (BBCSEX) for a good deal at retail.

#49 Posted by SARRISS (145 posts) -

Just because every shooter that comes out is the same doesn't mean that fighters are. I, as a fighting game enthusiast, feel I put more work into picking up new shooters than non fgc people put into fighters.

I do not think its unfair to say "try harder."

#50 Edited by ImmortalSaiyan (4676 posts) -

@xyzygy said:

If you really want to get into fighting games, I suggest starting with the original BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger. Why? Because then you start at the foundation of a fighting game, and if you want to learn more, you can advance in that series. Along the way you'll learn things universal to fighting games and also specific to the game itself - not to mention that the game is fucking amazing.

I wouldn't suggest this unless you are interested in the games story. BBCT had no tutorials, it has no online scene, and was also just a bad competitive game in general. If you are interested in learning BB, then pick up Blazblue Chrono Phantasm (BBCP) from japanese playstation store, wait until it gets released in March for NA, or see if you can find Blazblue Continuum Shift Extend (BBCSEX) for a good deal at retail.

This. BBCP, while hard to get, is a super good game from what I played. It is new to consoles as well, so it is still in a learning stage of the meta. Not that is it perfect, I hear Kokonoe is broken and that Overdrive is kinda a dumb mechanic.