#1 Posted by Icemael (6312 posts) -

A blog series about the development of Revengeance has been started on the Platinum Games site. The first blog is by producer Atsushi Inaba.

http://platinumgames.com/2012/12/13/the-rising-blog/

Excerpt:

At Platinum, we’re not so easily surprised. Still, I think the staff was pretty shocked when I told them, “We’re making Metal Gear Rising!” Kenji probably had a heart attack when I asked him, “Want to be the director? I need an answer right now.”
I really wanted to make this project happen, though. I remember all the plans I started making after I met with Kojima, to turn his proposal into a reality. In interviews I said, “I went for it because the thought of it excited me”, but I don’t want that to suggest I was simply impulsive.
What we at PlatinumGames make, if I were to say in short, can be defined by two words: “Pride” and “Dedication.”
Pride to think that, “If we make this, we can make it awesome!”
Pride to continuously expect more and more of ourselves.
Dedication to the principle that what we make should never disappoint our fans.
We want to be as sincere to those two words as possible.
That’s what PlatinumGames stands for.
However, this project introduced a new challenge: making something that Kojima Productions and Metal Gear fans everywhere would approve of. Kojima Productions believed in our talent as an action game maker, and we set out to meet to those expectations. Moreover, we strove to create something that exceeds the expectations of every Metal Gear fan. By the end, we had expanded the range of gameplay experiences we provide as a developer. It gave new meaning to our idea of dedication. That’s what you’ll find inside this project. That’s why I wanted to do it. No matter what.
But a game isn’t a game if it isn’t fun. Even with some dramatic “Developer: PlatinumGames!” announcement, if it isn’t fun, what’s the point? What really matters is that.
We only had a trailer for the VGAs, but with E3 and TGS, we were able to show our game off in a booth prepped for tons of fans to try out a demo of the game. Thankfully, the feedback from fans we received at both events was overwhelmingly positive. We were able to see the “dedication” end of our promise coming through. That being said, we knew we weren’t completely there yet.
#2 Posted by Icemael (6312 posts) -

This has nothing to do with the blog series but here's an interview from only a couple of days ago:

http://www.siliconera.com/2012/12/10/why-metal-gear-rising-revengeance-has-parrying-and-other-questions-for-platinumgames/

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance seems to have Kojima Productions style humor. There’s a scene in Denver where you turn around while a boss is lecturing Raiden about war and a soldier is petting a cat and there are those 3D cubes which reference the girly magazines from other MGS games.
Yuji Korekado, Creative Producer at Kojima Productions: You might think that it’s very Kojima Productions-esque, but all of the humor came out of PlatinumGames. We collaborated with them, but it usually came forth from their team. My favorite gag, you might have seen it in the realtime demo, where Raiden tries to put in a USB drive. [Laughs]
Speaking of stealth, Raiden can also sneak behind enemies to take them down and hide in cardboard boxes. That’s quite different from the concept of always moving forward, which you talked about earlier. Was it difficult to design levels for Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance with two different play styles – stealth and action?
Atsushi Inaba, Producer at PlatinumGames: The concept moving Raiden forward was the core design, but we wanted to give players options. We didn’t want players to say this game is only cutting, it could get dull after awhile. At PlatinumGames, when we were thinking about level design we wanted to give players an option if you go down this street you’re going to run into cyborgs and there will be heavy action with Raiden cutting them up. But, if you go this way you might be able to do stealth kills.
There are a lot of options per stage and there are things you can receive, items and whatnot, deepening on what route you go through. That adds replay value and we’re proud of that, as well. The path you take doesn’t matter, but in the end we hope our design offers a lot of play styles and will add to the value of the entire game.
#3 Posted by Morrow (1828 posts) -

Interesting. But the game was high on my list before anyways :]

#4 Posted by Icemael (6312 posts) -
#5 Posted by Icemael (6312 posts) -
#6 Posted by StarvingGamer (8028 posts) -

I'll have to come back and read these.

#7 Posted by Nentisys (886 posts) -

Fuck, I love Platinum so much.

#8 Posted by Icemael (6312 posts) -
#9 Edited by Icemael (6312 posts) -

Here's one by character animator Hirokazu Takeuchi:

http://platinumgames.com/2013/01/17/reacting-to-blade-mode/

Up until now, most games that had dismemberment systems only allowed things to be cut in a predetermined fashion. Slicing the enemy in two, for example, would usually mean simply creating one animation of the upper body separating from the lower half.
We, however, have given the player freedom. We don’t know where they’re going to cut. They could choose to cut off a leg or an arm… they could cut horizontally, vertically, diagonally… At the starting stages of development, there were different ways we tried to express this endless amount of possible reactions through procedural animations. Heads would fly or just plop off without relying on any canned animations.
Ultimately, though, these programmed reactions just couldn’t cross the threshold to become something we thought fully conveyed the intensity of the action, so we decided to undertake the slow, daunting task of creating animations for every thinkable dismemberment possibility.
We’d cut the enemy one way, add an animation, cut from a different angle, add another animation, repeating this process until the end of development, until we eventually were satisfied with the array of reactions we were able to get from each enemy.

That's pretty damn impressive.

#10 Posted by Video_Game_King (36068 posts) -

@Icemael said:

That's pretty damn impressive.

It's also why I'm now getting this game without knowing much of anything about MGS4.

#11 Posted by Itwastuesday (937 posts) -

thanks for reliably posting the cool stuff platinum puts on their site to the forums, I always look forward to their behind-the-scenes stuff

#12 Posted by Icemael (6312 posts) -
#13 Posted by cmblasko (1133 posts) -

@Icemael said:

Here's one by character animator Hirokazu Takeuchi:

http://platinumgames.com/2013/01/17/reacting-to-blade-mode/

Up until now, most games that had dismemberment systems only allowed things to be cut in a predetermined fashion. Slicing the enemy in two, for example, would usually mean simply creating one animation of the upper body separating from the lower half.
We, however, have given the player freedom. We don’t know where they’re going to cut. They could choose to cut off a leg or an arm… they could cut horizontally, vertically, diagonally… At the starting stages of development, there were different ways we tried to express this endless amount of possible reactions through procedural animations. Heads would fly or just plop off without relying on any canned animations.
Ultimately, though, these programmed reactions just couldn’t cross the threshold to become something we thought fully conveyed the intensity of the action, so we decided to undertake the slow, daunting task of creating animations for every thinkable dismemberment possibility.
We’d cut the enemy one way, add an animation, cut from a different angle, add another animation, repeating this process until the end of development, until we eventually were satisfied with the array of reactions we were able to get from each enemy.

That's pretty damn impressive.

That seems like a tremendous amount of work.

#14 Edited by Icemael (6312 posts) -

Programmer blog: http://platinumgames.com/2013/02/12/rising-and-the-role-of-the-programmer/

At a glance, the seeming complexity of stringing together a lot of operations and formulas may have a few of you thinking, “Wow! Programmers are pretty neat!” The real work we do, however, isn’t really as complex as you’d make it out to be. Some of the stuff that we do does require some critical thinking, but it’s not like every programmer does nothing but intense coding all the time. I’m not good at any of that complicated stuff myself, so I just toss it to other programmers on the team.

Then there might be some of you who think we all just pound away at our keyboards all day in complete silence, but feel free to remove that thought from your head. In reality, that would slow things down more than it would be helpful.

So we don’t do a lot of complex of work and we don’t live in front of our keyboards. “Then what do you do?!” would be the next logical question. Like I mentioned above, our job is to take what the artists give us and put it into the game, following the game designers’ guidelines, but we only follow these guidelines closely, not exactly. It wouldn’t be as interesting if we just worked in everything as we’re told, without adding our own touch. (But I don’t want you to make the mistake that all we do is protest everything the director asks of us… The director’s ideas form the base; we simply rework some of the details.) Still, as we are changing things on our own, we have to explain ourselves to the game designers and artists pretty often. Sometimes we even have to try and stand our ground against game designers and artists that pull a lot more weight than we do.

Some good insight. I didn't know programmers were as involved in the actual game design as they seem to be.

Character modeler blog: http://platinumgames.com/2013/02/13/a-cut-of-the-characters/

When we start dealing with mechs and cyborgs, we need to prepare different surfaces for each part of the body. If we cut the head, we need to get something that looks like a cutaway of the head. We also need to do the same with the arms, the legs, the hands… And you need to prepare different surfaces for different angles of cuts as well! The insides should look different depending on whether you cut vertically, horizontally, sideways, and so on.

Can you just imagine how many possibilities do we have to make?!

Eventually, we realized we’d have to not only design what characters looked like from the outside, but from the inside as well. We’d spend late nights discussing things like “How should this guy should look like this from this angle?” and “There should be a bone here, right?”

#17 Edited by Icemael (6312 posts) -
#18 Edited by rolanthas (242 posts) -

Programmer one was fascinating. I didn't even knew they had a say in the design, or had any leeway in how the whole thing comes together.

Platinum's blog is actually quite packed with stuff like this. They even had a mini show at one point. And Kamiya's Bayonetta video commentaries are just full of insane tidbits about its development.

Kenji Saito should totally start a playthrough / commentary after thins settle a bit , like Kamiya does.