#1 Posted by tallTuck94 (553 posts) -

I have spent the last couple of years studying media, film and history in my a-levels and recently i have regretted those choices completely maybe slightly because i'm getting lower than average grades (low b's and c's), and to be honest i only chose media because i joined my sixth form college late. However over the past couple of years I've developed a passion for science and i think i want to study it further as an a-level as my highest GCSE was in physics and that was when science bored me. However i should be leaving 6th form later this year and moving on and i'm really not sure if staying to study science would benefit me.

TL;DR I was just wondering if anyone had any tips for changing a subject or if i'm too late to study new a-levels.

Thanks in advance, any help is much appreciated

#2 Posted by BrockNRolla (1694 posts) -

If you like science and have an aptitude for it, a future career will be a lot easier to find in these areas rather than in "media." It might be more pain in the short time if you have to add more time and classes, but in the long run, you'll end up happier and more financially stable.

#3 Posted by UlquioKani (1179 posts) -

Don't do stuff you don't like. You can change to a different A-Level. You will need to explain in your personal statement that you did something productive with your third year if you do. I am doing a third year to do a full 2 year ICT course in a year in the hopes of applying to a better university.

#4 Posted by Heltom92 (714 posts) -

Not to be rude but wouldn't it be better to talk to someone at your college about this?

#5 Posted by BrickRoad (704 posts) -

Well, it's probably too late to change, but you could finish and then go back and take Science at A level. Maybe though your grades will give you enough credits to take a Science at degree level, or more likely, a diploma that gives you the credits to take a degree. Access courses I think they call them.

#6 Posted by Lenny (84 posts) -

I was a musician for years and then took a science degree when I was 26. There's always time to change direction dude.

#7 Posted by owen99 (44 posts) -

id say find what u want to do now whilst you are younger and not locked into anything. You dont want to go uni and spend loads of money on a degree u have no interest in, if science is your passion, then try that. Try to find a career that your interested, people get forced into jobs, which they hate and they spend years regretting it. I moved from history, english and business studies a levels, to a games design btec national diploma thing. best thing i ever did, now i work at a games studio and love it.

#8 Posted by tallTuck94 (553 posts) -

@Heltom92: probably but i literally have no idea who to talk to about this

@UlquioKani: so do you reckon would be possible to do say a 2 year physics a-level course in one year like your doing with ICT

#9 Posted by Subjugation (4740 posts) -

You should really get in touch with your adviser.

#10 Posted by UlquioKani (1179 posts) -

@tallTuck94: You need to speak with your Physics teacher.

#11 Posted by Hailinel (25205 posts) -

@tallTuck94 said:

@Heltom92: probably but i literally have no idea who to talk to about this

@UlquioKani: so do you reckon would be possible to do say a 2 year physics a-level course in one year like your doing with ICT

There should be an advisory office that you can go to. Most universities have counselors on hand to provide advice and guidance on this very topic. Talking to one should help you decided on whether you want to change your major and what the best way to go about it would be.

#12 Edited by tallTuck94 (553 posts) -

cheers for the advice everyone

seems pretty clear now that i need to talk to a career adviser at my college, no idea why i didn't think about that before

#13 Posted by Jimbo (9979 posts) -

It'll benefit you more than Media, Film and History (you might as well finish em though if you're that close). If you've decided you wanna aim a bit higher, now's the time to do it if you can. You're still only young (presumably) - two years is nothing in the scheme of things.
 
With decent A-levels in decent subjects you'll be able go to Uni and study a real subject that people will actually care about. I say go for it.

#14 Posted by Jimbo (9979 posts) -
@tallTuck94 said:

@Heltom92: probably but i literally have no idea who to talk to about this

@UlquioKani: so do you reckon would be possible to do say a 2 year physics a-level course in one year like your doing with ICT

I have A-levels in both of those. ICT is easier. You could absolutely cram a Physics A-Level into a year though if you put the effort in - particularly if you were only studying that one subject (or maybe that and one more). Maths goes well with Physics, but Maths is waaaay harder imo. If you wanna do Math and Physics I think you'd probably want two years.
#15 Posted by tallTuck94 (553 posts) -

@Jimbo: yeah i ruled out maths back in GCSE, it never clicked with me like physics did. if i were to take another subject i would probably take biology or chemistry

#16 Posted by UlquioKani (1179 posts) -

@Jimbo said:

@tallTuck94 said:

@Heltom92: probably but i literally have no idea who to talk to about this

@UlquioKani: so do you reckon would be possible to do say a 2 year physics a-level course in one year like your doing with ICT

I have A-levels in both of those. ICT is easier. You could absolutely cram a Physics A-Level into a year though if you put the effort in - particularly if you were only studying that one subject (or maybe that and one more). Maths goes well with Physics, but Maths is waaaay harder imo. If you wanna do Math and Physics I think you'd probably want two years.

Forgot to mention this actually. ICT is crazy easy, that's the only reason I'm doing the course in a year. Physics is a bitch so you need to up for it. The jump from GCSE to A-Level for physics is big. I got an A* in GCSE and barely got a C in my first year of A-Levels, had to retake the exams which was a hefty price to pay. Be prepared or you will get overwhelmed

#17 Posted by Benny (1955 posts) -

@tallTuck94: Do a degree that has a foundation year at the beginning. Any A-Levels are usually accepted and GCSEs must be at a certain standard. The first year of the foundation year will be everything you learn at A-Level for the relevant subjects crammed into one year and then you begin the normal degree with everyone else, most likely better prepared than they are.

You're quite late as far as the UCAS deadline though.

#18 Posted by Xtrminatr (263 posts) -

It's really not too hard to switch, for the most part half your credits will be the same, and you can just take one extra class a semester to finish. Get whatever degree offers you the most options later in life, you need some sort of financial stability later in life even if it costs you a bit more money now. I'm an accountant because I am good at it, some day when I am more financially stable I hope to find something else that I am good at that I enjoy more.

#19 Posted by Jimbo (9979 posts) -
@tallTuck94 said:

@Jimbo: yeah i ruled out maths back in GCSE, it never clicked with me like physics did. if i were to take another subject i would probably take biology or chemistry

Be prepared for Maths if you take A-Level Physics. Most of what you could do with Physics in the future will also involve Maths to some extent.
 
Also look into that Foundation year thing ^^. That might be just what you're after.
#20 Posted by theodacourt (546 posts) -

I finished a National Diploma (basically 3-A levels) in Music Practice and got a place on a fairly standard Computing course at university. I had to go through clearing as I'd applied for music courses with UCAS, and the one computing course that I applied for late said they would have me wouldn't let me take the course I wanted because of my grades. I found a place though through clearing and it helped in my telephone interview that I was quite good at computing anyway and that I was dedicated to learning the subject and determined to do well.

Three weeks into the course I realised that over half my modules were business focused and I switched to Music at that same university.

My pro tips are:-

1. Make sure you want science to be your LIFE for years. I'm always wanting to do different things and eventually I change my mind again. I'd love to have studied physics but I would have gotten bored and then interested again. Uni fee's are crazy expensive if you're not certain it will benefit your future.

2. Make sure you are absolutely prepared for the course as you can be. This means learning as much science of your choosing on your own as well as you can. I'd recommend this whether you get a place on a foundation degree, bachelors or for another A level / Access course.

3. The teacher's are looking for students who will complete the course to a good level of grades. Show them your enthusiasms with good knowledge and determination and you'll do okay. It also means really trying to get as good grades as you can in your current courses.

4. Don't expect to get into a very good university. Below maybe the top 20 uni's in the country however, most are pretty even and will fluctuate on the national charts.

The biggest worry is to make sure that you're absolutely 100% set on physics. I love learning, and most of all when there is instant gratification or fun to be had. That's why I did well in maths where it's right and wrong answers, physics with all the sweet experiments, music with getting to play music and computing where you make something work out of nothing. Physics won't be like that at university. There are still experiments to be had but it's a lot more thought than excitement. At least with music there was constant performance throughout my degree.

#21 Posted by Dany (7887 posts) -

They're called advisers. Use them not us. If you haven't utilized their service based on your track record you need to start ASAP.

#22 Posted by sickVisionz (1268 posts) -

A-levels... college... is this like American high school you're talking about? If so, no. High school doesn't mean anything so you're never too late to start doing something. You're not even supposed to have figured out what you want to do yet imo. That and your first year or two of university/us-college should be you jumping around figuring out what you'd like to do for the rest of your life.

General rule: if you're in high school or university, there's nothing that you're "too late" for.

#23 Posted by Bruce (5264 posts) -

@tallTuck94:

I don't know how the system is over in Europe, but here in the States changing your major that late is suicide. Since our government aid is limited, for a number of semesters, you're pressured to finish within a certain time frame.

Again, not knowing how it works in Europe (since you mentioned A levels), I'd say you should think long and hard about it. Then, weigh the pros and cons. Studying a different subject in university could mean undoing years of work.