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#1 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -

So, as the title suggest... What does everyone here think of anti-depressants?

#2 Posted by shivermetimbers (877 posts) -

They help, but they can be abused. One should seek counciling before resorting to them.
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#3 Edited by Pinworm45 (4069 posts) -

The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants. 
 
So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed. 
 
Anyway, I'll change my mind the day 
 
1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 
2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 
3. It becomes less over-diagnosed 
And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants. 
 
Edit: For the record, I was put on them once despite having no interest nor was I anything I would consider depressed, and they did exactly nothing. Maybe I'm biased. I still stand by what I think, as I've seen a lot of evidence. Of course, it doesn't apply to EVERYONE - but if you read my post, you're on them, and were offended, odds are I'd say it applies to you.

#4 Posted by GunslingerPanda (5012 posts) -
@Pinworm45 said:
" The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants.  So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed.  Anyway, I'll change my mind the day  1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 3. It becomes less over-diagnosed And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants. "
Oh God, this uninformed idiot again.
#5 Posted by Pinworm45 (4069 posts) -
@GunslingerPanda said:
" @Pinworm45 said:
" The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants.  So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed.  Anyway, I'll change my mind the day  1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 3. It becomes less over-diagnosed And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants. "
Oh God, this uninformed idiot again. "
I dunno, scientists and shit agree:  http://www.bmj.com/content/335/7615/328.full
#6 Posted by mwng (1026 posts) -

3 posts in and no "Pretty cool guy" meme?

#7 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@Pinworm45 said:
" @GunslingerPanda said:
" @Pinworm45 said:
" The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants.  So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed.  Anyway, I'll change my mind the day  1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 3. It becomes less over-diagnosed And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants. "
Oh God, this uninformed idiot again. "
I dunno, scientists and shit agree:  http://www.bmj.com/content/335/7615/328.full "
Do you think that depression and mental disorders are largely psycho-semantic (Made up in your mind) or are actual mental defects as a result of a chemical imbalance? 
#8 Edited by Pinworm45 (4069 posts) -
@Jaserno said:

" @Pinworm45 said:

" @GunslingerPanda said:
" @Pinworm45 said:
" The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants.  So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed.  Anyway, I'll change my mind the day  1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 3. It becomes less over-diagnosed And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants. "
Oh God, this uninformed idiot again. "
I dunno, scientists and shit agree:  http://www.bmj.com/content/335/7615/328.full "
Do you think that depression and mental disorders are largely psycho-semantic (Made up in your mind) or are actual mental defects as a result of a chemical imbalance?  "
That's kind of a loaded question. I'd say the majority of cases of depression are not genuine, but that doesn't mean that there's no such thing as actual deficiencies, physiological reasons, or actual cases of depression that can be treated with medication. 
 
But for the most part, it's over diagnosed, it's over treated, the treatment isn't generally successful (whether you want to argue that's because of the medication or because no condition exists in the first place is up to you). And it also tends to make people annoying, but that's a purely subjective opinion, obviously.
#9 Posted by beej (1675 posts) -
@Pinworm45 all that article suggests is that depression is over diagnosed not that it's crap. I'm glad you're taking that combined with your personal experience and making a rule though
#10 Posted by Korolev (1783 posts) -

They're useful SO LONG as you have a medical condition that can be treated by them. Many people who take them have no need to, or have been misdiagnosed.  
 
And they do have side-effects, although the seriousness of the side-effects varies from mild to dangerous, depending on the drug and the dosage. My father takes Serotonin daily - and it helped. He is noticeably and visibly happier now (no he isn't "jazzed" and "peppy", just back to how he used to be - happy). He takes very little and it appears to have no side-effects. It was absolutely necessary - as he got older, he got more depressed. His life circumstances didn't change, but he just started feeling blue. He tried many non-drug routes to get rid of the problem - none worked.  
 
I'm generally against drug use - although I recognize the importance of medical drugs, like anti-cancer drugs or anti-retroviral drugs, for treating medical diseases, it's my policy to examine whether or not I really need them. And sometimes I do. But I have noticed that some doctors (only a few bad apples) have tried to push uppers on me, when I had a case of insomnia and tiredness. In reality, all I needed was an adjustment to my sleeping cycle and less caffeine, but I got doctors trying to shove all kinds of pills down my throat. It's one thing to suggest pills to a patient who has a condition that needs them - but it's another to straight away jump to "here, take these" right out of the gate.  
 
My brother has had to take anti-depressants. In my opinion, he doesn't need them. He only takes them around his university exams, when he's stressed out. But he's only stressed because he doesn't study hard enough. It's cases like that which don't need anti-depressants.  
 
But of course, there are cases in which people DO need anti-depressants. People with genuine chemical imbalances in their head, which can't be treated by anything other than pills. I took a course in neurology when I was doing my under-grad - I've forgotten most of it, as it wasn't very useful to me, but I do recall learning that some cases of depression are more akin to a mental illness - receptors in the brain just don't work right no more, or certain chemicals just aren't secreted, or the vesicles containing the neurotransmitters across the synaptic gap just can't get reabsorbed. In those cases, there's nothing the sufferer can do except take medication.  
 
So anti-depressants are valuable and can improve people's lives and are a great addition to medicine in general. But some (few) unscrupulous doctors try to push pills to patients who don't need them. Some doctors have unfortunately, taken too much of a shine to anti-depressants, viewing every case as a case that needs medication. This leads to over-prescription, and over-use. Then there are some patients who have self-diagnosed themselves with depression and have lied to a doctor to get pills they don't need. There's even more people who decide not to listen to a doctor's advice and take more than is recommended. I've seen this happen as well - the patient starts off with a small dosage, but then starts getting worse over time. Rather than report back to the doctor to discuss an appropriate course of action, the patient decides to take more of the medication, which can lead to disaster.  
 
I'm not a doctor - although I did take medical courses and I keep up to date on medical advancements. I've read the papers and examined the studies. There are genuine cases of depression that warrant medication. There are genuine drugs that can help with those cases, and can make a positive impact. But there are also many cases that do NOT require medication, in which the drugs can make a decidedly less-than-positive impact. And just as there are drugs with mountains of stats and evidence to back up their effectiveness, there are some drugs whose studies I have read and found VERY questionable. Not every peer-reviewed paper can be treated with the same respect - I've seen a lot, and I mean a LOT of crap getting into some prominent journals. Usually these crap papers are proven wrong over the course of time and replaced with better studies. 
 
But just so you know - be wary. Accept anti-depressants if you need to, but also be a bit inquisitive. I'm not saying you shouldn't trust your doctor. I'm saying you shouldn't really trust some pharmaceutical companies. They can do good work, I know, but they're also motivated by profit. 

#11 Posted by audiosnag (1604 posts) -

The "what do you think of them" question is sorta strange.
I don't think you can give a definite answer either way, somepeople abuse them or don't need them an others do.
For that person who just likes wallowing in self pity an enjoys sympathy, they need to grow up and do something about it.
Others though can't help it due to a chemical imbalance or psychological issue.

#12 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@Korolev: Thank you. That was a good read. I know, the subject it is taking on shouldn't make it a good read. But yes, doctors do try to palm everything off as depression and deal with it with drugs. Which does have negative effects on the individual and those around them. Anti-depressants, as with all drugs have good and bad effects. The majority of the time, the misdiagnosis of patients and/or lying of the patient to the doctor leads to the bad effects. Those who need them, should take them. Too many people think they are depressed purely because of a bad situation. I say, make the best of any given situation and things will look up.
#13 Posted by Pinworm45 (4069 posts) -
@beej said:
" @Pinworm45 all that article suggests is that depression is over diagnosed not that it's crap. I'm glad you're taking that combined with your personal experience and making a rule though "
Yeah? I never said it didn't exist? I said it was massively over diagnosed, and when it's misdiagnosed, it's useless and makes people annoying. If you want a nicely put post about it, Korolev's is decent.
#14 Posted by RaceKickfist (222 posts) -

I take them, my mother takes them, my brother takes them, it's kind of a family thing. I wouldn't necessarily claim genetics as a culprit for a chemical imbalance, but it would be strange not to consider it a possibility. as for my personal experience, they really helped get me out of the constant "woe is me" thing and get me to move on with my life. I've since (with a physician's help) gotten off of one anti-depressant, and once some ther parts of my life have calmed down enough where i'm not dealing with so many curveballs, I plan on getting off of the other one. In regards to mr. pinworm's post, I'm actually *not* that offended. since I made great strides in keeping my medication my own business from friends and the like. Shit, I even tried to keep my actual depression as much of a secret as possible. Attention was the LAST thing i wanted. what i wanted was what anti-depressant gave me; that dont-give-a-shit attitude that can get you to stop internalizing every bit of life-minutiae, and can get you back to living your life. Maybe it's a genuine chemical imbalance, or perhaps, as Jaserno asked, its purely psycho-semantic, it could very well be one or both or whatever. They worked well for me. And now that I know how to handle life a little better (or a lot better, actually) than I did in highschool, it's time to move off of them. 

#15 Posted by Utiow21 (76 posts) -
@Korolev:  Awesome, awesome advice. thank you
#16 Edited by Vonocourt (2170 posts) -

I don't know how I feel about them. I'm on day three of my first experience,  and the first two days I just found myself in a even worse state. I know it's going to take a while before they start doing anything positive, but If it happens again today I'm gonna chuck the rest.

#17 Posted by Lev (135 posts) -

Well, if we are talking about SSRI antidepressants as I would assume, I don't see how they could possibly be abused. I think there is a lot of confusion about what antidepressants are - they are *not* valium, xanax, zoloft, etc... I think what a lot of people are thinking about are anti-anxiety pills.
 
Antidepressants usually just deal with addressing imbalances in how the body uses serotonin (hence why basically all of them are referred to as SSRIs; selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors). These are things like prozac, and no, they cannot get you high, regardless of what you may have come to believe. They usually just deal with countering feelings of emptiness, or bring balance to issues which could otherwise put you over the top.
 
The pills that can be abused typically are used for treating anxiety - these kinds of pills are in a completely different class, purpose and area of affect.
 
I've never heard of a single person abusing traditional SSRI antidepressants in my entire life, because I don't see how it could even be done.
 
I personally have mixed feelings about them. I've been on SSRIs for a few years regularly now, and as much as I hate to admit it sometimes, they have kept me somewhat more balanced. Little things could set me off onto very antisocial tendencies before, and the smallest of things to other people could really make me depressed. Being overly sensitive to every little dirty thought also could completely ruin my day, week, month or life, but all of that has typically balanced out.
 
They don't make you a zombie - in the same way that anti-psychotics (haldol) do, but they don't make you feel happy either. They just curve the massive drops some people encounter sometimes.
 
And that's another thing - they won't work for everyone, and they can be completely useless for some people. If your body is already using serotonin effectively they will have virtually no effect on you.
 
In an important differentiating factor between the purpose of antidepressants and antianxiety (and similar) pills is that antidepressants try to fix the cause (seritonin level) whereas antianxiety pills just work as a band-aide by masking whatever issues there are and getting you doped up... ehr, not that I necessarily think there is anything wrong with getting doped up as long as you still aim to fix whatever problems you have in life (be they physiological, mental or other).
 
If you consider taking them, some things to expect range from loss of appetite and increased appetite and a complete loss of sexual drive, urge. Those are the biggest two IMHO. Oh, and never consider quitting them if you've been on them a while without some form of regular contact with someone checking up on you because many recent studies have shown suicidal thoughts are actually increased when you quit using them.

#18 Posted by jackbag (210 posts) -
@Korolev said:
" There are genuine cases of depression that warrant medication. There are genuine drugs that can help with those cases, and can make a positive impact. But there are also many cases that do NOT require medication, in which the drugs can make a decidedly less-than-positive impact.  "  
#19 Posted by c1337us (5877 posts) -

Personally I think they are a waste of time. But I am not depressed so I am not one to talk about it.

#20 Posted by ZeForgotten (10368 posts) -

Placebo effect, that's what I think personally. 
But if they help, that's all fine and dandy but I don't think they would help if the depressed person doesn't wanna be helped. 
Again, that's just what I think, I'm not doctor or whatever

Online
#21 Edited by Akrid (1391 posts) -
@Korolev: You go to your doctor for drugs, not life advice. They assume the only reason you bring up an issue is because you want drugs to make it go away. Since it's, y'know, their job.
 
I don't know if we still have this problem, but here in Canada we had a dire shortage of family doctors, so mine needs to make split second decisions and rushes me out the door. Issues like that make healthcare convoluted and leads to improper diagnoses. For instance, I couldn't eat without severe nausea for months. I had x-rays and an endoscopy only to find out it was due to the antibiotics I was on. If my doctor had remembered that he prescribed medication coinciding with my stomach acting up instead of immediately jumping to thoughts of ulcers he could have saved me some trouble. At least I lost some weight.
 
On-topic, I was on various anti-depressants for a few years, didn't do shit. In fact, judging by my position in life now as opposed to then, it made me worse.
#22 Posted by imad81 (118 posts) -
@Lev said:

 "many recent studies have shown suicidal thoughts are actually increased when you quit using them. "

Actually, the risk of  relapse is maximum within 6-9 months of starting medication. The risk of relapse is highest amongst those who have had 2 or more episodes of clinical depression in the past, in whom the Anti depressants are not discontinued(unless the patient stops taking them). I agree with you on the fact that SSRI's cant be abused, primarily because its effects are not instantaneous. It takes a variable peiod of time for different members of the SSRI drug class to act, varying between 2-4 weeks.
 
@Vonocourt said:

" I don't know how I feel about them. I'm on day three of my first experience,  and the first two days I just found myself in a even worse state. I know it's going to take a while before they start doing anything positive, but If it happens again today I'm gonna chuck the rest. "

Initially, they do make you feel worse and side effects like Nausea and restlessness develop during the first week. But soon you should be able to adjust to them,as most patients do, say within a week ranging upto 10-12 days maximum. 
 
@Korolev said:
 Some doctors have unfortunately, taken too much of a shine to anti-depressants, viewing every case as a case that needs medication. This leads to over-prescription, and over-use.  "
The reason for that is a term called 'defensive medicine'..its when I suspect a patient has condition X and refer him to a specialist for an evaluation. In the meantime however, till he gets to the specialist, the condition needs to be managed(especially in a condition like depression, where the risk of suicide increases exponentially the longer the patient waits)..this is to ward off any lawsuit that may occur in a situation where the patient doesnt go to the specialist.
 
@Pinworm45 said:
" The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants.  So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed.  Anyway, I'll change my mind the day  1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 3. It becomes less over-diagnosed And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants.  Edit: For the record, I was put on them once despite having no interest nor was I anything I would consider depressed, and they did exactly nothing. Maybe I'm biased. I still stand by what I think, as I've seen a lot of evidence. Of course, it doesn't apply to EVERYONE - but if you read my post, you're on them, and were offended, odds are I'd say it applies to you. "


LOL!!!
 
You need to get your facts straight..I can state for a FACT that depression is linked to decreased levels of 3 neurotransmitters, Dopamine, Serotonin and Nor adrenaline. In fact the risk of suicide correlates best with levels of dopamine in the brain. Unless you want to cut open every patients brain and analyse the tissue for these neurotransmitters, you have to believe that what the patient is experiencing is true (one of the first things taught in residency)..and hence labelling every patient with these complaints as a 'malingerer' is counter-productive and even dangerous. 
#23 Posted by Everyones_A_Critic (6496 posts) -

I've never been depressed enough to have to take them, fortunately. I've had bad days, downright terrible days, but nothing that I haven't bounced back from in due time.

#24 Posted by JammyJesus (771 posts) -
@CaLe said:
" Was on Effexor 275mg/day for 2 years. Made me gain 11kg and feel the exact same. I've been off them for a year and lost all that weight and now going to the gym is my anti-depressant, works much better. "
Exercising releases endorphins.  
 
Funny this thread just came up. Iv just came back from the doctors. A couple of years ago I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety. The depression has been gone for a few years now, but I still have to go to the doctors about my anxiety issues. I'm currently on meds for that and in the future I'm going to have to see a cognitive therapist to sort it out once and for all.  
  
I also think that people should know that there is nothing wrong about talking with a doctor, family or friends about how you are feeling. I could see some people misreading the "attention seeking" aspects of the previous posts. There is a difference. Updating your status on Facebook is attention seeking. Having a friend visit/going to see a friend and talking through your problems it not. 
#25 Posted by Blair (2548 posts) -

LSD, MDMA, Ketamine and Psilocybin Mushroom are all believed to have much more instantaneous and long lasting effects on the human brain than a traditional Anti-Depressant.  The negative side effects are also much more prevalent in Anti-Depressants. Moreover, most psychedelics target the release of Serotonin and not Dopamine, so their addictive properties are generally not as intense as Dopamine-releasing drugs.  I'm not a proponent of illicit drugs but it shows just how comparably-terrible most Anti-Depressants can be.

#26 Posted by skadbob (232 posts) -

I don't think what people call "uppers" are generally what antidepressants are. Uppers might be part of the cocktail that a psychiatrist prescribes to his/her patient to treat depression because the cocktail also usually includes some form of sleep aid (depressant)... but the actual antidepressants in the mix are usually what's called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This will be your Lexapros, Paxils, Zolofts, or Prozacs. In most cases they don't have any immediate "positive" effects. In fact, if I remember correctly, it takes around 2 weeks of continuous use to actually notice any desired effects. The operative word is continuous use. Before that you'll just really notice all the nasty side-effects. Well... sex can seem to last forever for some people, that might be a good thing in some cases.
 
The thing about antidepressants is that it's really, really hard to describe its effects. It doesn't actually make you "happy." Most people would probably say that it makes them feel "numb."  And there are a lot of side-effects that would make any one not on antidepressants reasonably depressed. 
 
Anyway, arguments about the efficacy of antidepressants when compared with placebos aside, I think antidepressants are fantastic. Yes, depression might be over diagnosed in some places. Yes, there are alternative, proven methods of dealing with certain types of depression (i.e. long-term daily jogging actually treats some people diagnosed with clinical depression better than long-term drug use). But neither of those things nullifies the need for these drugs. You'll find controversy with any pharmaceutical drugs. I mean... one specific type of antidepressant was actually linked to a higher suicide rate amongst teenagers! (I think it was Zoloft, I might be very wrong about this)... But a lot of drugs officially labeled as antidepressants get prescribed for off-label use. An old example would be that Prozac (commonly referred to as the miracle drug) was used to treat OCD and eating disorders before it was officially labelled for those uses. I think it still continues to be a miracle drug today. 
 
@JammyJesus said:

I also think that people should know that there is nothing wrong about talking with a doctor, family or friends about how you are feeling. I could see some people misreading the "attention seeking" aspects of the previous posts. There is a difference. Updating your status on Facebook is attention seeking. Having a friend visit/going to see a friend and talking through your problems it not.  "
This! 
 
And yeah, attention seeking might be really annoying, but consider the fact that maybe some attention seekers really do need some attention.
#27 Posted by Lev (135 posts) -
@Blair said:
" LSD, MDMA, Ketamine and Psilocybin Mushroom are all believed to have much more instantaneous and long lasting effects on the human brain than a traditional Anti-Depressant.  The negative side effects are also much more prevalent in Anti-Depressants. Moreover, most psychedelics target the release of Serotonin and not Dopamine, so their addictive properties are generally not as intense as Dopamine-releasing drugs.  I'm not a proponent of illicit drugs but it shows just how comparably-terrible most Anti-Depressants can be. "
 
Completely agree!
 
I think the reason for this is simple: psychedelics (and to a lesser extent ketamine or MDMA - I don't see MDMA as a psychedelic as many people seem to) force upon you different ways of looking at things. Through psychedelics you're forced to relook at your life through another perspective, and sometimes just seeing your life from another point of view is enough to get many people back on track.
 
But I agree - it is also my personal opinion that psychedelics are far more powerful in treating many forms of depression. Finally much of the world is listening as I'm constantly reading about researchers being "turned on" again to psychedelic therapy. It's about frigging time in my opinion.
 
And for the record, I don't like to consider psychedelics as "drugs" - they are tools. They should never be considered even remotely the same as things like cocaine, heroine, etc.
#28 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@JammyJesus said:   
 
 I also think that people should know that there is nothing wrong about talking with a doctor, family or friends about how you are feeling. I could see some people misreading the "attention seeking" aspects of the previous posts. There is a difference. Updating your status on Facebook is attention seeking. Having a friend visit/going to see a friend and talking through your problems it not.  "
 
Definitely correct. I've been speaking to people about getting through the days. I have only told two people that are at university with me about how I feel but now they are there entirely for me whenever I need to talk. It's nice to have someone who can help, at hand when and if I need it. I know they have their own problems as we all do, I don't want to be a burden and I am constantly reminded that I am not. "Afterall, we are your friends, let us help" - Is a common statement. And to reassured that I am not a burden and that I have people helping is a wonderful thing. I am still to be prescribed antidepressants and I am still seeing counsellors but proactive and medical help working together will get me through much quicker and back to my old self, I'm sure.  
 
@UncertainOtter said:
And yeah, attention seeking might be really annoying, but consider the fact that maybe some attention seekers really do need some attention. "  
 
You're right. For a long time I've whined and groaned on Facebook and only recently has it come to many people's attention that I do need help.
#29 Posted by imad81 (118 posts) -
@Blair said:
" LSD, MDMA, Ketamine and Psilocybin Mushroom are all believed to have much more instantaneous and long lasting effects on the human brain than a traditional Anti-Depressant.  The negative side effects are also much more prevalent in Anti-Depressants. Moreover, most psychedelics target the release of Serotonin and not Dopamine, so their addictive properties are generally not as intense as Dopamine-releasing drugs.  I'm not a proponent of illicit drugs but it shows just how comparably-terrible most Anti-Depressants can be. "
The point you make is partially correct with respect to Dopamine, but increasing serotonin levels predisposes you to develop Schizophrenia(yikes!). And medically speaking, it is not the best idea to push a depressed person towards psychedelics, whatever the THEORETICAL advantages. 
 
And I agree Anti-depressants are not perfect, but consider the fact that at one time in the history of psychiatry, ALL mental illnesses were treated with Electro Convulsive Therapy(ECT), or in layman terms, strapping electrodes to the scalp and electrocuting the patient. 
 
@Lev said:
I don't like to consider psychedelics as "drugs"
Unfortunately, the rest of the world disagrees with you.
#30 Posted by Jimbo (10147 posts) -

Pull yourselves together, ffs.
 

#31 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@Jimbo said:
" Pull yourselves together, ffs.
 
"
Why has that picture been made famous, where is it originally from?
#32 Posted by PrivateIronTFU (3858 posts) -

They're not necessary. 

#33 Posted by xyzygy (10590 posts) -

I am currently on Mirtazapine because of my anxiety which prevents me from talking to people, being in public, and feeling pressured from every angle. Because of this, it leads to depression. 
 
I used to take Paxil, Clonazepam, Zoloft, and Effexor. The only one that worked was Paxil but the side effects were too much for me to handle. No sexual drive, no emotions. I felt like the Paxil's solution to the problem was to block of all feelings to get rid of one feeling. So I got off that drug, and wouldn't recommend it to anyone in the world.  
 
Mirtazapine isn't really doing much for me either. I'm still stressed, anxious, nervous as hell in public and the pressure of this all is still crippling. I'm thinking maybe the dosage might be too low.

#34 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@xyzygy said:
" I am currently on Mirtazapine because of my anxiety which prevents me from talking to people, being in public, and feeling pressured from every angle. Because of this, it leads to depression.  I used to take Paxil, Clonazepam, Zoloft, and Effexor. The only one that worked was Paxil but the side effects were too much for me to handle. No sexual drive, no emotions. I felt like the Paxil's solution to the problem was to block of all feelings to get rid of one feeling. So I got off that drug, and wouldn't recommend it to anyone in the world.   Mirtazapine isn't really doing much for me either. I'm still stressed, anxious, nervous as hell in public and the pressure of this all is still crippling. I'm thinking maybe the dosage might be too low. "
Quite possibly. I would talk to my doctor if I were you. Or at least have someone contact my doctor on my behalf if you feel you can't speak to him/her. 
#35 Posted by MauveForest (605 posts) -

I don't mind feeling sad really. I don't really feel the need for anti-depressants, if I am feeling down I usually write, read, or reflect on my life. It gives me perspective and though may not immediately help me feel better I know I will get over it in time. I guess one can assume I have never really been depressed if I have been able to get over everything like this, or that my life is pretty easy and that I don't have much to worry about. Which is true I guess, but everyone has there problems we have to solve, and I have found that this is the way I deal with this problems best. I don't know if this would help me through serious depression, but I will try not to be overwhelmed by it if it ever comes to that. 
 
@Lev: I agree with you completely. Perspective is everything and those drugs are definitely tools which can help you get that perspective you need. Though, it is just one tool that can be used to gain this perspective of course. 

#36 Posted by xyzygy (10590 posts) -
@Jaserno: Oh, I've only been on the Mirtazapine for a week so I'm still just waiting for that. I already have an appointment with my Psychiatrist to let her know how they're working, and if I need to up the dose or not. So I guess from here on it's a waiting game.  
#37 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@xyzygy: Then in time I am sure the effects will become apparent and you should be okay. But, listen to your psychiatrist more than anyone. Unless they are just trying to dose you up to the eyeballs and make you another statistic 
#38 Posted by Mrskidders (1298 posts) -

Whatever they gave me helped me back from the brink 5 years ago and I have been fine ever since.  Spent 2 years on them.  Placebo or not, they worked.  Other factors helped like some life changes but the pills definitely helped.

#39 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@Mrskidders said:
" Whatever they gave me helped me back from the brink 5 years ago and I have been fine ever since.  Spent 2 years on them.  Placebo or not, they worked.  Other factors helped like some life changes but the pills definitely helped. "
I want to change my life more than anything. I don't want to be reliant on medication
#40 Posted by Mrskidders (1298 posts) -
@Jaserno: I wasn't, just needed it to control certain symptoms to allow me to make those changes.  Just get the ones that arent as addictive.
#41 Posted by crusader8463 (14744 posts) -

If they work for you great. I took them for a couple months a few years back and they didn't do anything for me. I think they are mostly a placebo and only work if you believe they will work, because I went into it as a negative nancy about them working and they never did for me. Who knows.

#42 Posted by Jaserno (255 posts) -
@crusader8463 said:
" If they work for you great. I took them for a couple months a few years back and they didn't do anything for me. I think they are mostly a placebo and only work if you believe they will work, because I went into it as a negative nancy about them working and they never did for me. Who knows. "
I'll bear this in mind. I don't want to be prescribed something and doubt it's effects. That's already lessening my treatment really.
#43 Posted by hunkaburningluv (565 posts) -
@Pinworm45 said:
" The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants.  So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed.  Anyway, I'll change my mind the day  1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 3. It becomes less over-diagnosed And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants.  Edit: For the record, I was put on them once despite having no interest nor was I anything I would consider depressed, and they did exactly nothing. Maybe I'm biased. I still stand by what I think, as I've seen a lot of evidence. Of course, it doesn't apply to EVERYONE - but if you read my post, you're on them, and were offended, odds are I'd say it applies to you. "
 
Unfortunately this kind of idiotic stigma further alienates those who actually need to seek help and ultimately try to self medicate or worse. 
 
A lot of peeps need anti-depressents. Saying that though, I do agree that some docs do seem to dish them out rather easily. 
#44 Posted by Pinworm45 (4069 posts) -
@hunkaburningluv said:
" @Pinworm45 said:
" The only thing I've ever seen anti-depressants do is give people the ability to self-masturbate and tell everyone how unique and interesting they are because they have had such a baaad life they're on anti-depressants.  So generally, they annoy me. It's also like ADHD. Some dude got dumped by his girlfriend and is crying about it for attention, so he must have "clinical depression!". Then they have an excuse to keep crying for attention. It's like ADHD in that it's extremely over diagnosed.  Anyway, I'll change my mind the day  1. People stop saying they are on anti-depressants as a way to gain sympathy or attention 2. The people on them are generally actually in need, unlike the vast majority of people I've seen 3. It becomes less over-diagnosed And most importantly, 4. I see some actual results of anti-depressants.  Edit: For the record, I was put on them once despite having no interest nor was I anything I would consider depressed, and they did exactly nothing. Maybe I'm biased. I still stand by what I think, as I've seen a lot of evidence. Of course, it doesn't apply to EVERYONE - but if you read my post, you're on them, and were offended, odds are I'd say it applies to you. "
 Unfortunately this kind of idiotic stigma further alienates those who actually need to seek help and ultimately try to self medicate or worse.  A lot of peeps need anti-depressents. Saying that though, I do agree that some docs do seem to dish them out rather easily.  "
So, basically what you're saying is, you completely agree with me, then.  
 
Whatever dude. Your idiotic stigma is alienating those who actually need help. 
 
(???)
#45 Posted by KaosAngel (14251 posts) -

Look at me when I say this, don't be a pussy and make sure you realize life isn't that bad.  At least you aren't an illegal immigrant who works like a slave on a labor farm.  Get your ball-sack, and nut the hell up.  Enjoy life for what it is, and make sure to Vote next week.
#46 Posted by Azteck (7416 posts) -

And this is why I avoid topics like these with people who can't seem to understand.

#47 Posted by TheSeductiveMoose (3629 posts) -

I've never had the need to take them so I have no real opinion.

#48 Posted by sodiumCyclops (2778 posts) -

I considered taking them once a little while back when I was depressed. Managed to claw my way out of it faster than expected... Depression is something NOT to be fucked with.

#49 Posted by yinstarrunner (1252 posts) -

I was a really depressed kid in high school, so I took them for a few months there.
 
They made me feel better, I guess.  Didn't exactly make me happy, but they stopped me from wallowing in self-pity so much.  Just made me feel kinda numb emotionally, like a soulless robot or something.  I didn't want to live life that way, so I chose to take the good with the bad instead of shutting down all sense of feeling.

#50 Posted by ThePickle (4262 posts) -

Giant Bomb is my anti depressant.