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#1 Posted by aragorn546 (186 posts) -

I teach in brooklyn ny and was wondering if there were any other fellow gaming teachers

#2 Posted by Logan_Aybara (73 posts) -

I've been a teacher for 11 years, but a gamer for even longer!

#3 Posted by turbomonkey138 (5281 posts) -

The average age on this site is 16-18 so there won't be many i think .

#4 Posted by bretthancock (798 posts) -
@aragorn546: What do you teach?  I have a friend who is a history major with a minor in education and the other is a linguistics major with a minor in early childhood.
#5 Posted by mikeeegeee (1625 posts) -

I'm an elementary education major and I'll be student teaching in just under a year. Kind of looking forward to it, kind of terrified.

#6 Posted by Coltonio7 (3214 posts) -
@Zombiepie: 
 Is totally becoming a teacher.
#7 Posted by Alex_Murphy (1195 posts) -
@turbomonkey138 said:
" The average age on this site is 16-18 so there won't be many i think . "
Are you sure about that? I would have guessed the average would be a bit older.
#8 Posted by brodywb (200 posts) -

I'm a teacher.
#9 Posted by Bucketdeth (8235 posts) -

My girlfriend is currently in University to become a teacher.

#10 Posted by lovecreep (175 posts) -

i am

#11 Posted by KaosAngel (14251 posts) -

I was in my earlier years in Japan, taught Businessmen/women, and then once a week at a high school to the same classes. 

#12 Posted by diz (1003 posts) -

I used to be.
#13 Posted by Red12b (9346 posts) -

I mentor kids if that qualifies.

#14 Posted by Penelope (260 posts) -

I'm 22 and have been bumming around in Asia for years as an English Teacher.  
 
All of you went and got that degree for nothing! I make the same salary you make with the added bonus of getting to live in places like Taipei and Tokyo! 
 
Biggest scam there is.

#15 Posted by aragorn546 (186 posts) -

I personally did not get and education undergraduate degree, i got one in creative writing. BFA ftw. 
 
I became a teacher through the NYC teaching fellows program which is currently paying for my education masters. I find Education classes to be the most useless things on this planet. They will almost never have any real bearing on your teaching. Your knowledge of content and personality are what guide you as a teacher. 
 
I currently teach seventh grade english, my license is 7-12 so i may be looking to do high school in a few years. 
Junior high, especially in NY, is a crazy ass age group to teach. Last year I taught Eighth grade and a good majority of my students were 16 or so. 
 
Teaching abroad sounds awesome, a friend of mine did it in japan and she loved it.

#16 Posted by aragorn546 (186 posts) -
@diz: @diz said:
" I used to be. "
what happened? usually those are good stories.  
 
and for those who do teach: do you ever bring your love of games into the classroom? I've used Ezio from AC2 to model an example of a character in a man vs. society conflict and used god of war as an introduction to my unit on Greek mythology. Both times it grabbed their attention (my students are now all freaks for different mythologies) and seems to have given my opinion mor weight with them.  
 
Any one else have this experience?
#17 Posted by benitobb (321 posts) -
@aragorn546:
Nice, I'm currently signed up for an Urban Teacher Residency Program in Newark.  I'm sure teaching in the city gets crazy, but Newark's right there with it.
#18 Posted by RandomInternetPerson (823 posts) -
@diz:
#19 Posted by iam3green (14368 posts) -

no, not teachers.

#20 Posted by Ubiquitous (576 posts) -

My brother is a  teacher. I'll probably become an art teacher someday.

#21 Posted by Warfare (1674 posts) -

God no i hate kids.

#22 Posted by aragorn546 (186 posts) -
@Warfare said:
" God no i hate kids. "
@Warfare:  
This is why i teach 7-12th grade. They are more tollerable the less likely they are to pee themselves. Also, it is why everyone in the public bitches about how easy teachers have it, but when suggested that they then too should become teachers turn around and say "god no, I'd be fired on day one"
#23 Posted by nanikore (2755 posts) -

I don't teach children. 
 
 
I eat them.

#24 Posted by lovecreep (175 posts) -

actually i guess i am not really a teacher per say... I am a teacher's aide ( a para) in a MH classroom. So i have no teaching degree
#25 Edited by diz (1003 posts) -
@aragorn546: 
 
I foolishly dropped out of real work to do a post-grad year-long GTP to become an ICT teacher, then went on to teach in a grammar school for 3 years; becoming head of ICT and Computing in my last year there. 
 
I found teaching to be a complete nightmare of a career. The teaching side of things was good, if repetitive (even after 3 years!), but there were some severe difficulties to me continuing my career as an ICT and computing teacher: 
 
1. The mindless bureaucracy, stone-age methods and systems used in UK schools today (and I'm talking about the good ones) is over-bearing. In order to do the job according to the government job specification, teachers don't have enough time in the week to do any of it to any degree of quality, so either work themselves silly, or muddle through. 

2. Teaching methods are entirely prescriptive nowadays, so inspiring students to learn is set-aside in favour of learning a very rigid and broad set of facts with no variation, or depth - by rote. In my subject (ICT and to a lesser extent to computing) much of the information taught is out-dated, irrelevant and some oft incorrect.  In my particular case, the department had only 3 full-time IT teachers (in a school of 700 boys), the rest being either learning support staff or lad techs.
 
3. The teaching profession is spoiled by government intervention and unionization, so creativity, free exchange of ideas, or senses of  teamwork just don't exist, like they do in other industries. Instead, I found a wall of bureaucracy, empire building, blame shifting, belly-aching and doom.
 
3. I had a particularly bad experience and tragic (among an unexpectedly huge variety of other job-related) circumstances that made my job intolerable. I chose to work at a classic grammar school, where IT was a low priority and the headmaster was a technophobic bully. At least I've now got a permanent teaching qualification I suppose, which is useful in potentially getting me supply work anywhere in the country, should I ever need  to resort to it.
  

@RandomInternetPerson:  

Its all true!
#26 Posted by mutha3 (5025 posts) -
@aragorn546 said:
" @Warfare said:
" God no i hate kids. "
@Warfare:  This is why i teach 7-12th grade. They are more tollerable the less likely they are to pee themselves. Also, it is why everyone in the public bitches about how easy teachers have it, but when suggested that they then too should become teachers turn around and say "god no, I'd be fired on day one" "
:(
 
But kids are at their cutest when  their under the age of 10!
 
I'm the opposite of you: I love kids!
 
..... but I hate teenagers(well, not all of course:P)
#27 Posted by aragorn546 (186 posts) -
@diz:  
Good to see the UK education system has pretty much the same problems as the NYC one. I hate so much of the bullshit that surrounds the profession. Just let me be a goddamn teacher!
#28 Posted by ZombiePie (6260 posts) -
@Coltonio7 said:
" @Zombiepie:   Is totally becoming a teacher. "
'Tis true I have begun student teaching.
Moderator
#29 Posted by masterherocard (465 posts) -

I come from a long line of teachers on both sides of the family, but I myself am not one.

#30 Posted by luce (4056 posts) -

I teach children the art of "Street"

#31 Posted by damnboyadvance (4172 posts) -

Nope, but it's nice to know that some teachers actually like video games. There's probably only one teacher in my school that actually looks like he does something like that.

#32 Posted by Guerrilla_Mason (512 posts) -

I'm a high school math teacher, currently teaching the required 7th grade math through geometry and trigonometry. This is my first full year, but I took over for a teacher last January. 

Online
#33 Edited by rollosm (37 posts) -

I'm a high school math teacher too.

#34 Posted by Tireyo (6712 posts) -

I want to become a teacher, does that count?

#35 Posted by SuperSambo (3038 posts) -

My brother teaches PE/Games and he is soon to be a History teacher aswell.

#36 Posted by skywing (1293 posts) -

I'm a Teaching Assistant in my organic chemistry and biochemistry classes, does that count?

#37 Posted by Twazuk (190 posts) -

I was going to make a joke about pedophilia but decided against it.

#38 Posted by brodywb (200 posts) -
@aragorn546 said:
"I personally did not get and education undergraduate degree, i got one in creative writing. BFA ftw.  I became a teacher through the NYC teaching fellows program which is currently paying for my education masters. I find Education classes to be the most useless things on this planet. They will almost never have any real bearing on your teaching. Your knowledge of content and personality are what guide you as a teacher.  I currently teach seventh grade english, my license is 7-12 so i may be looking to do high school in a few years. Junior high, especially in NY, is a crazy ass age group to teach. Last year I taught Eighth grade and a good majority of my students were 16 or so.  Teaching abroad sounds awesome, a friend of mine did it in japan and she loved it. "

You are so right about this. I have been teaching for 6 years and am just now finishing my masters. I took my comps today and the whole process of studying for them has just reiterated how worthless the majority of education classes are. The content area classes are pretty good, but teacher training in this country is long overdue for some sort of reform.
#39 Posted by JonathanMoore (1880 posts) -

Hoping to become a Music teacher after University.

#40 Posted by Organicalistic_ (3092 posts) -

dud, i had three awesome teachers last year, u guys should be like them, seriously i wrote them letter to appreciate how good they were.

#41 Posted by Organicalistic_ (3092 posts) -
@Guerrilla_Mason: don't be like my last one i had and give students work and say do it
#42 Edited by Penelope (260 posts) -
@aragorn546: Japan is great but the students can be little bastards (more so than anywhere else I've taught) and the cost of living is pretty insane. 
 
The culture, food, language, people and atmosphere are all tough to beat though. 
 
Japanese was so much easier to learn than Chinese. 
 
Pro tip for being an awesome teacher? Remember those awesome teachers you had in school? Yeah the cool ones? 
 
Be like them.
#43 Posted by MysteriousBob (6262 posts) -
@turbomonkey138 said:
" The average age on this site is 16-18 so there won't be many i think . "
 Don't make shit up. We had a poll and the average was significantly older than that.
#44 Posted by turbomonkey138 (5281 posts) -
@MysteriousBob said:
" @turbomonkey138 said:
" The average age on this site is 16-18 so there won't be many i think . "
 Don't make shit up. We had a poll and the average was significantly older than that. "
Can i have a link ? I don't really care enough to go searching through old posts
#45 Posted by Jazz (2335 posts) -
@Penelope said:
" I'm 22 and have been bumming around in Asia for years as an English Teacher.   All of you went and got that degree for nothing! I make the same salary you make with the added bonus of getting to live in places like Taipei and Tokyo!  Biggest scam there is. "
I'm just starting the CELTA course next month, but I already have a masters in English lit and a degree in Law so its the best of both worlds. 
Tokyo here i come
#46 Posted by diz (1003 posts) -
@turbomonkey138 said:
" @MysteriousBob said:
" @turbomonkey138 said:
" The average age on this site is 16-18 so there won't be many i think . "
 Don't make shit up. We had a poll and the average was significantly older than that. "
Can i have a link ? I don't really care enough to go searching through old posts "
If you don't care, why make stuff up?
#47 Posted by Shotaro (814 posts) -

I teach MATHEMATICS!

#48 Posted by pweidman (2447 posts) -
@aragorn546 said:
" @diz:  @diz said:
" I used to be. "
what happened? usually those are good stories.   and for those who do teach: do you ever bring your love of games into the classroom? I've used Ezio from AC2 to model an example of a character in a man vs. society conflict and used god of war as an introduction to my unit on Greek mythology. Both times it grabbed their attention (my students are now all freaks for different mythologies) and seems to have given my opinion mor weight with them.   Any one else have this experience? "

I'm in my 12th year teaching elementary kids, mostly 5th grade.  And I am open with my students about my love for gaming.   Most of 'em love video games anyway, and they do dig talking to me about games and movies cuz they know I'm into all that.  What's also a blast is on Fridays I give them free time in the comp lab and we play some simple online games(some of these have gotten pretty damn advanced!)and get some competitions going, putting high scores on the whiteboard etc.  
 
Anyway for all you taking the courses or training to teach, here's my advise: you won't really get any practical experience, or actually get a clear idea of how and what the job really entails, 'till your in the classroom.  Sub or help out hands on with students, and really pick the brain of your master teachers when that time comes...invaluable experiences that can help you survive the profession, or perhaps even realize it's not for you.
#49 Posted by Shotaro (814 posts) -
@pweidman said:
" @aragorn546 said:
" @diz:  @diz said:
" I used to be. "
what happened? usually those are good stories.   and for those who do teach: do you ever bring your love of games into the classroom? I've used Ezio from AC2 to model an example of a character in a man vs. society conflict and used god of war as an introduction to my unit on Greek mythology. Both times it grabbed their attention (my students are now all freaks for different mythologies) and seems to have given my opinion mor weight with them.   Any one else have this experience? "
I'm in my 12th year teaching elementary kids, mostly 5th grade.  And I am open with my students about my love for gaming.   Most of 'em love video games anyway, and they do dig talking to me about games and movies cuz they know I'm into all that.  What's also a blast is on Fridays I give them free time in the comp lab and we play some simple online games(some of these have gotten pretty damn advanced!)and get some competitions going, putting high scores on the whiteboard etc.   Anyway for all you taking the courses or training to teach, here's my advise: you won't really get any practical experience, or actually get a clear idea of how and what the job really entails, 'till your in the classroom.  Sub or help out hands on with students, and really pick the brain of your master teachers when that time comes...invaluable experiences that can help you survive the profession, or perhaps even realize it's not for you. "
What he said, the actual training courses are next to worthless in terms of what you ACTUALLY DO in a classroom, it's full of theories and theorists on motivation and in my case adnragogy (Adult Learning - though I teach mostly high-school age kids, in the UK that is post-compulsory).
 
Yes I do take gaming into the classroom, I talk about DnD and DA:O and how the chances to hit are based on dice rolls and use it to teach them simple probability.  I am trying to get hold of some DS's so I can use some of the puzzles from Layton that involve ratios to help them with those (they may prove too difficult, but if you don't try...)
#50 Posted by aragorn546 (186 posts) -
@organicalistic_ said:
" dud, i had three awesome teachers last year, u guys should be like them, seriously i wrote them letter to appreciate how good they were. "
@organicalistic_:  What made them so awesome? I always like to learn from other teachers techniques