#1 Edited by SavageManLove (93 posts) -

As I sit here depressed to no end, getting closer to 30 and considering suicide periodically, I wonder what the hell I'm doing with my life. It occurred to me today that I always fantasized about making my own video games, not for the sake of becoming rich or famous but as a creative outlet and to be able to sit in my room with a cup of coffee and tinker on something I love for hours on end.

With that depressing intro aside, if I eventually wanted to make my own games (yeah yeah another one of THOSE threads), and very very little knowledge of programming (I got a BS in Computer Science but forgot pretty much most of it) what would be the best first programming language to start learning that would have the most carry over to game making in the future?

Serious thread guys, this means a lot to me.

#3 Edited by I_Stay_Puft (3565 posts) -

C++ sounds like the language to learn if you're seriously thinking of doing some game development. Hope that helps and good luck!

#4 Edited by andmm (213 posts) -

That's a pretty broad question and the best answer is... depends. Which platform do you want to develop for? Are you going to write for a specific engine? Game maker for instance, which is pretty good for beginners, uses it's own game maker language (gml).

It boils down to the tool that you are going to use. If you want to start with a more complex engine like unity, then you should learn either C# or Javascript. I think C# would be a great starting point, because a whole number of other frameworks use C#.

If you want do develop a more basic mobile game, Java would be a good one. There are some pretty great java frameworks out there that compile to multiple platforms (android, ios, pc, html5).



#5 Edited by Chaser324 (6649 posts) -

First, on a super serious note, don't commit suicide. I know life can suck - I'm getting close to 30 myself and starting to have my own crisis about the state of my life. There's no shortage of people on GB that have been through the same dark spots in their life that will be more than happy to talk to you. Don't do it.

On the game dev side of things. Have you tried out stuff like GameMaker or Unity? If you have a BS in Comp Sci, I'm sure you have at least some familiarity with something like Java or C++, so you could probably pretty quickly get into doing some stuff with GameMaker's GML (paging @rmanthorp) or C# in Unity. In the case of GameMaker and to a somewhat lesser degree Unity, you can even do a pretty substantial number of things without diving into writing your own code at all.

As someone that has dabbled with Flash/Actionscript before, I've also been interested for a while in trying out OpenFL, an open source implementation of Flash that's based on Haxe (which is essentially just an evolution of Actionscript). A lot of awesome Flash game libraries like Flixel and FlashPunk have been ported over to it, and those can be great for getting stuff up and running quickly.

Moderator
#6 Posted by Fear_the_Booboo (554 posts) -

Seriously, if you want to do games, just download gamemaker and do some online tutorial. Use only the code function and soon enough you'll be able simple mobile game.

Seriously, it took me two months at maybe a couple of hours a week and now I can do basic games with no problems.

Buy it though. The free version have some code function that are disabled, which is conterintuitive if you want to learn. When you understand the basics, you can go easier on Unity or C++ or something. Gamemaker is essentialy a great prototype or learning tool.

#7 Posted by helvetica (113 posts) -

Probably something Object Orientated (Java, C#, C++) would be your best bet. I'm learning Objective-C (also OO) right now for mobile development and coming from years of PHP it feels different. Not bad, just different.

Have you considered doing a sort of browser game? Maybe something in HTML 5 and javascript? I get a kick out of Web dev because you can put stuff together pretty quickly, and there's lots of resources out there. You can use sites such as PhoneGap to build in HTML 5, CSS, and javascript to push your game/app/whatever to all devices. The downside to that is I've heard that it sort of works on all systems, which is why I'm learning Objective-C.

http://www.codecademy.com/ is free and great for learning. I'm going through lynda.com, but you do have to pay for it.

#8 Posted by PimblyCharles (1566 posts) -

I'd actually start with the basics learning Assembly just to get familiar with logic and structure. If you already have some programming experience, then learn C#, C++, and Javascript would be the languages to learn for making a game.

Unity is a great framework/engine to start with, and it's basically free unless you start making money off your software.

Have fun duder! Programming can bring a great feeling of accomplishment in the end when it all comes together and works.

#9 Posted by CaLe (4018 posts) -

Speaking from personal experience, finding something you feel passionate about and can put your time into can be one of the most effective counters to depression there is. If you think this might be that for you, pursue it aggressively, make it an important part of your life and let it occupy your mind as much as possible. There's a good chance it could become a very real shield against those depressive thoughts.

#10 Posted by Chaser324 (6649 posts) -

I'd actually start with the basics learning Assembly just to get familiar with logic and structure.

I have to disagree with this. I even taught assembly while I was in grad school, and I think it's only real benefit is as a complement to learning about digital logic and computer architecture. The vast majority of programmers will never actually dive deep enough to actually need to write assembly. I've occasionally had to, but that was only in super-specialized programming for an embedded device.

If you really want a slower ramp up on basic programming logic and structure, I'd really suggest going straight to learning something like Python or Javascript through http://www.codecademy.com/. They're pretty easy to get started with, have some potentially practical use, and they teach basic programming knowledge that is pretty easy to transfer to C#, C++, Java, etc.

Moderator
#11 Posted by D4RKSH33P (64 posts) -

I know you want to make video games, but if you feel like you are looking for a creative outlet over learning a technical skill why not start developing table top games. No programming necessary, but you can still create things that are interesting to you with only a few scraps of paper and a pen.

#12 Edited by PimblyCharles (1566 posts) -

@chaser324: For the reasons you mentioned, that's why I recommended Assembly. It was a great stepping stone into other languages. At that time (about 15 years ago), VBA and C++ were easier to get into with that background. Of course it can be skipped, but is still good knowledge to know in the world of programming and how it relates to computer architecture. You can't argue against that, right?

I went back and read the original post, and do agree this duder should just jump into another viable language instead of Assembly since they have a BS in Computer Science.

I can see how you'd look at learning Assembly as a waste of time, but for a novice programmer I still think it's very useful.

By the way, Python and Javascript are great recommendations.

#13 Posted by GERALTITUDE (3428 posts) -

java, for sure. Easy to learn, similar enough to C.

#14 Edited by EthanML (455 posts) -

Python is an excellent and frequently recommended first language, though I think Java is a good option too.

Games, especially simple ones such as text-based stuff, can be made in literally any language so don't feel too much pressure regarding which language to learn first - if there's one thing you learn with time as a programmer its that the language doesn't really matter much provided you know how to think about programming problems the right way.

#15 Edited by Chaser324 (6649 posts) -

@pimblycharles:

Learning Assembly isn't necessarily a waste of time. There's value in learning it regardless of the fact that you'll probably never use it.

I started out learning C and Assembly, and while I think there's a huge benefit to learning that lower level stuff, it can definitely be off-putting to some people. I don't think there's any harm in starting with Python or Javascript just to grasp some programming basics and then circle back around if you want more well-rounded knowledge. If all you ever want to do is just make games in GameMaker or Unity, you might not really even need that.

I've worked with people that only ever learned Java in school, and it has definitely convinced me that learning at least some C, C++, and/or Assembly should be required for all Computer Science / Computer Engineering students (I assume though that if you're a Computer Engineering student like me that you absolutely would learn that low-level stuff).

Moderator
#16 Posted by Bollard (5662 posts) -

As a first programming language, Python is really relaxed in its rules and is what I used to grasp the basics. Once you've learnt that the skills are very transferable, and once you've done a few languages you realise generally they are all very similar.

For making games though, Unity makes it a doddle. For that I'd recommend using C# because JavaScript is the devil.

#17 Edited by sub_o (905 posts) -

I'd say Python, or Processing.

I started with Visual Basic, C, then C++, then certified Java developer. But now I'm really liking python for scientific computing.

Python is really clean and elegant language. The forced indentations, lambda functions, easiness to import modules, etc, made it my go to language for fast prototyping.

But since you're a newcomer, you might want to look at Processing (http://processing.org). Processing is created mainly for non-computer science majors. It comes with lots of in-built drawing functionalities, so that you can have a great visual feedback almost immediately. It's also based on Java, so when you learned Processing, you're also learning part of Java.

Tutorials are freely available everywhere, so you can start anytime.

Here are some stuff that I created using Processing:

#18 Edited by helvetica (113 posts) -

@pimblycharles: For a college course, I was required to code in binary and Assembly. The binary wasn't so bad because it was something simple, but holy cookies Assembly was tough! The experience did make me appreciate high level languages more.

#19 Edited by Gamer_152 (14091 posts) -

@pimblycharles said:

@chaser324: For the reasons you mentioned, that's why I recommended Assembly. It was a great stepping stone into other languages. At that time (about 15 years ago), VBA and C++ were easier to get into with that background. Of course it can be skipped, but is still good knowledge to know in the world of programming and how it relates to computer architecture. You can't argue against that, right?

Honestly, I think there are better stepping stones. Assembly is important for understanding computers overall, it's not that hard, and introduces come important concepts used in other programming languages, but there's a reason that it's often not taken as the starting point for teaching most people about programming. If you want a stepping stone into something like C++, there are other programming languages closer to it, which incorporate more of the concepts used in higher level languages, and come in a more easily readable format. Sure, more complex languages would be easier to get into with a knowledge of Assembly, but that doesn't mean there aren't better alternatives, and advising people not to take it as a starting language doesn't mean they should skip it. I, like Chaser, just think it's the kind of thing that's probably better to fill in your knowledge of later on.

I'd recommend SavageMan to start learning programming with C#, although something like Python or Java would be a good place to start from as well. However, as many others have suggested, starting developing games with GameMaker is probably the way to go. Unity can be a great tool as well, that you should definitely take a look at, but I think GameMaker is a little easier to swallow if you're just getting into it.

Moderator
#20 Edited by Chaser324 (6649 posts) -

@bollard said:

For making games though, Unity makes it a doddle. For that I'd recommend using C# because JavaScript is the devil.

Yes. If you do get into making games in Unity, please use C#. I hate that it even supports JS because it tricks some beginners into thinking that's a reasonable option.

Moderator
#21 Posted by tourgen (4542 posts) -

Gamemaker has expanded and improved the free version quite a bit recently. Also great deals on the upgrade.

Unity is the #1 dog for getting into 3D game building for entry level teams. It does all of the hard stuff for you and has better-than-decent tools. C# (Mono) isn't terrible. I mean, it's not Java at least.

Straight ISO Standard C with the SDL library is pretty powerful and simple for getting started at some more low-level stuff if that interests you. Microsoft Visual C/C++ Express is free. So is Codeblocks+Mingw32. Pick up the K&R book and learn the basics then work through some SDL examples.

#22 Posted by rickyyo (147 posts) -

C++ is the way to go as it will help you in understanding where everything comes from. By programming in C/C++ you will learn and be able to engage with things before and after it in a much more meaningful way. It will allow you to hope into other languages with ease... There are a couple of exceptions to that but any scripting language (Python, Lua, Ruby) and the most popular compiled and interpretive languages. If your wondering what one of the exceptions is it happens to be LISP/CLISP. LISP is used to program AI stuff.

#23 Edited by PimblyCharles (1566 posts) -
@gamer_152 said:

@pimblycharles said:

@chaser324: For the reasons you mentioned, that's why I recommended Assembly. It was a great stepping stone into other languages. At that time (about 15 years ago), VBA and C++ were easier to get into with that background. Of course it can be skipped, but is still good knowledge to know in the world of programming and how it relates to computer architecture. You can't argue against that, right?

Honestly, I think there are better stepping stones. Assembly is important for understanding computers overall, it's not that hard, and introduces come important concepts used in other programming languages, but there's a reason that it's often not taken as the starting point for teaching most people about programming. If you want a stepping stone into something like C++, there are other programming languages closer to it, which incorporate more of the concepts used in higher level languages, and come in a more easily readable format. Sure, more complex languages would be easier to get into with a knowledge of Assembly, but that doesn't mean there aren't better alternatives, and advising people not to take it as a starting language doesn't mean they should skip it. I, like Chaser, just think it's the kind of thing that's probably better to fill in your knowledge of later on.

I'd recommend SavageMan to start learning programming with C#, although something like Python or Java would be a good place to start from as well. However, as many others have suggested, starting developing games with GameMaker is probably the way to go. Unity can be a great tool as well, that you should definitely take a look at, but I think GameMaker is a little easier to swallow if you're just getting into it.

I actually learned programming originally with Basic and QBasic. Didn't learn binary and Assembly until college. It did help my programming grow tremendously in C++ creating classes and functions, along with the logic/structure behind them.

Point being, you're right that it's not necessary for a starting point, but could/should be learned at some point. I'll take that recommendation back.

Still sticking with C++, C# and java script being the languages SavageManLove should look into. Unity is a great start also, and it's free (*until you profit).

#24 Posted by Jimbo (9866 posts) -

Unity is a great place to start I'd say. I forget which language it uses, C# maybe? Whatever it is, I had no previous programming experience and got to grips with the basics pretty quickly. I used Blender for art / animation and likewise that seemed relatively straightforward to get into with a little effort.

Both Unity and Blender are (/were) free, have stacks of tutorials online and have very helpful and welcoming communities supporting them. They may not be up to pro developer standards, but just for tinkering around with and sinking some time into they are ideal.

#25 Posted by PimblyCharles (1566 posts) -

@savagemanlove: I'm 31 years old, and have/still go through moments like you're currently having. I deal with social anxiety and depression most days of the week. It's all about the state of your mindset and how you choose to deal with these issues.

I get through it with many ways including writing ideas down in a journal, painting/drawing, eating better and getting exercise by hiking. These help a lot to keep the mind focused and happy. Life is too short, so you should go for it. Make your mark in this world! Maybe you'll create something that becomes popular. Maybe you'll create a game that doesn't get that recognition. You have the right idea that it doesn't matter since you'll have the satisfaction that you made something special and personal from scratch. Wish I could make a game with my time, but too busy building on database back ends for work. Making a game is serious work, so hope you have the time to do it. Maybe find others willing to help and collaborate with the project. You've got plenty of smart duders on this site to ask!

If you're serious about making a game, you should start preparing art assets while learning a language. Download Unity and give it a go. It's free. Check out samples of others work in Unity and use those as a learning tool. Start physically or digitally drawing sketches, characters and foreground/backdrop assets. Decide if you want to go 2d or 3d. If going the 3d route, you will need a 3d modeling program to create 3d objects that can be imported into Unity.

Hope this helps!

#26 Posted by SavageManLove (93 posts) -

I'll probably start with C++ just to start with SOMETHING. It's also kind of a fulfillment of a childhood threat I made when I was younger to learn C++ and get into video game making until I just killed that dream. I figure I can move on from there and not stress too much on better this and that.

Kind of got home and a wave of fear washed over me. I'm so used to be a loser in life that the thought of NOT being one made me absolutely scared. The internal dialogue began of "You're too old to start doing this, do you really want to do this" blah blah.

Programming and depression oh boy what a combo. Anyway thanks for the help guys, it means a lot to me. Any good sources to start C++?

#27 Posted by Shadow (4981 posts) -

I'd say C. Then move onto C++ once you've got those concepts down

#28 Posted by hermes (1535 posts) -

If your interest is solely in making some games, there are tools like game maker or RPG maker, that allow for quite professional work with an easier learning curve that pure programming languages, and they are actually affordable. Games like Gunpoint, To the Moon, Spelunky and Hotline Miami were all made with those tools.

If your interest is in learning to program, my advice is to start with Pascal or C++/C#. Pascal is a language that is used exclusively for educational proposes nowadays, so it can be hard to recommend to someone that wants to see some results fast, but its the best place to start getting the basics and some good practices. C++/C# are both widely used professionally, so they are both good options if you want to have programming as a skill for your CV, but they are less strict than Pascal (meaning they allow for less neat solutions), so my advice would be to get a good book on amazon as a starting point. There are a lot of material on the Internet, but I would wait until you have a basic level of understanding before going there...

#29 Posted by ichthy (532 posts) -

Posting just so I can come back and grab some links. I've always thought about tinkering with a programming language so I can try to make a game as a personal exercise, but for me I always get stuck at the what kind of game to make part. Kinda sucks not being creative at all.

#30 Edited by SavageManLove (93 posts) -

Upon second thought maybe I'm not sure of C++ lol. I'd like to be as "independent" as possible as I like doing stuff by myself and someday I would like to create my own (as much as I can) first person dungeon crawler RPG, shitty doom era graphics probably and all. Maybe C# would be better to learn then as that would fit into unity and stuff? Now would I try to make something like the new Might and Magic X or go super old school and do Might and Magic 6 with sprites and stuff. Dilemma! Any insight would be a help but I realize at some point I just need to freaking start!

#31 Posted by carlthenimrod (1596 posts) -

When in doubt go with the popular choice. That would probably be C# and the Unity engine at this point. They have some video tutorials on their site: https://unity3d.com/

However, if you are really serious then I would invest additionally in some books or possibly some online courses(more so if you tend to procrastinate). From my personal experience, it is best to learn from as many different resources as possible. Sometimes a book explains something better than a video tutorial and vice versa.

#32 Posted by edsone (268 posts) -

To begin C is not the best idea. Neither is assembly. I'd recommend a easy to learn OO language such as Java even though I dislike it and then go to C# that's intuitive if you know Java. Then go to C++. If you want develop for Apple devices take a look at objetive-c. Important thing is theory. You can adapt to anything then. Especially at a company when you may need to learn to program with a language you're not familiar with.

If you want to work on more technical aspects of gaming and graphics then a good backgroind in C helps. Assembly to more extreme cases. I never had to use it in my professional life. When you're working very low level stuff, very close to the hardware , say drivers,compilers etc. If you have a degree in Computer Science you'll probably have seen it at least during Computer Architecture classes. To the avarage programmer it may not be necessary though.

Anyway, as I said the most valuable thing here is the theory. To grasp OO Java is very hand, love it or hate it.

#33 Posted by TyCobb (1972 posts) -

I will always say C# when someone asks to learn how to program. The basic syntax is very close to other languages like C++ and Java.

It is simple enough for someone to learn how to program and is one of the most powerful languages when building something that isn't game or scientific processing related. C# is also in constant development so there are new features being added every couple of years. The only caveat is that C# is primarily Windows only due to it being on top of the .NET framework. In order to do anything on another platform, you'll need to look into Mono.

XNA used C# and even though XNA is pretty much dead, I still feel it is a great starting point. I've said many times that once you learn how to program, almost all other languages are purely just learning the syntax and whatever small "gotchas" the language may have (**cough** declaring variables inside loops in Java **cough**). Now this of course is completely untrue if you try and jump from a managed language to an unmanaged one, but you have to start somewhere and probably don't want to start with one that will drive you completely mad at the start.

#34 Edited by edsone (268 posts) -

Never mind. Took the time to read better the other answers and I mostly agree with @Chaser324

Good because is a pain to write using my phone :p Great advices. And yeah, don't kill yourself. I get depressed for some reasons often but I'm not giving up anytime soon. There're always some pleasures we can take from life and they're worth more than any pain we have to go through.

Also, a hobby is important. Outside preferably. Something social if you can. It does help a bit. See what works for you. That may even be valuable in the future. I know I'll never regret studying music and learning Japanese. Something physical is good too. Amd don't quit. Those things will tale your time but the time you'll have will be better spent. Just a suggestion. For some people this works. Doesn't hurt to try. Good luck.

#35 Posted by Immunity (67 posts) -

I've read a lot of the posts and agree with most of what has been said. If you want to get a job in the games industry with programming, learning C++ is your best bet as it's pretty much the standard language in the industry.

However, it seems like you just want to start making something. As suggested earlier, Unity and C# are a good way to go. You can always pick up a C++ book later on if you want to get more serious about it. Here are some resources that might help you:

Official Unity Tutorials - These are archives of hour-long training livestreams that Unity conducts pretty regularly on Twitch

List Of Tutorials - A thread in Unity's "UnityAnswers" community with a TON of links and information for learning Unity.

/r/gamedev - General game development subreddit

Obviously there's a whole lot more out there than what I linked but the three above already have an overwhelming amount of information. Just keep going until you feel comfortable then start making something of your own and try not to get discouraged. It will be difficult and confusing for a while but you will get better. Good luck, duder!

#36 Edited by Burzmali (452 posts) -

I'll agree with the folks saying Unity. Even if you've forgotten most of your co-sci learning, you should be able to pick C# up pretty quickly. The fact that you can compile for pretty much any desired platform, and it's free for the basic usage, and it does both 2D and 3D make it a really good choice since you aren't limited in those ways.

Alternatively, you could try Gamesalad. It's all drag-and-drop object "coding" and you can whip simple games out incredibly quickly. It's also free for basic usage, and compiles to a lot of different platforms. Really, if you want to start making a game and have something basic in a couple of days, Gamesalad is where you might want to start. There was a game jam a while back where some group's coders dropped out 6 hours in or something. The rest of the team grabbed Gamesalad and had a respectable game done 40 or so hours later when the jam was over. It's super easy to understand and use. The downside is that you won't really learn anything that could translate to another development platform, though.

#37 Posted by Carryboy (717 posts) -

Dont want to come of as a complete arsehole (just partial I guess) but didnt you make pretty much this exact thread like a year ago? My memory could be wrong and it was someone else in which case ignore me.

#38 Edited by Hugh_Jazz (359 posts) -

Starting with C++ might be a bit steep to begin with, and learning C# in order to get into Unity is also kind of a difficult proposition. The issue with Unity is not the complexity of the programming, as far as I've found. I would maybe recommend C# using XNA(or whatever the open-source equivalent is nowadays), as there should be pretty good tutorials out there and you can build that stuff using Visual Studio Express. Another example would be Java and Lightweight Java Game Library, though I haven't had any personal experience with that yet. If you wanna get going fast, and prototype an idea, I do suppose Gamemaker is the best way to go.

#39 Edited by T3chyT0m (11 posts) -

Learn Python The Hard Way or any of the other versions from Learncodethehardway.org/

Don't be put off by the name! These are a great resources for learning a language for the first time!

Gaming related PyGame is a python library that I found was fairly easy to get started with.

#40 Posted by Sinusoidal (1651 posts) -

What kind of game do you want to make?

If you want to go 3D, try Unity. It's mostly free, unless you want the pro version or start making money with games you've made ($100'000, so by that point you can afford to buy it anyway.) Unity supports Javascript, Lua and C#. Use C# for sure. Unity's version of Javascript is so mangled, many people just call it "Unityscript". C# is also much easier to debug and generally more robust.

There's also Blender for 3D games. It's free and open-source. The game engine is a bit rough though, the program is primarily a 3D modeler/renderer. It uses Python scripting. Beware compatibility issues. I made a game in Blender and it only works in Windows 7, 64-bit installs...

If you want to go 2D, I'd advise Game Maker. Avoid the free version, your game will be crippled by its restrictions. Yoyo periodically gives out free licenses for the Studio version. I got it for free last December, they've had the giveaway twice since then, so if it's not free now, wait a bit and it will be. Maybe learn some GML (Game Maker Language) in the free version in the meantime. Game Maker language is quite simple and shouldn't pose any problem if you've any programming experience at all. You can also do quite a bit with just its drag and drop functionality not touching the code at all, but you will have to code if your game is even remotely complex. Gunpoint and Risk of Rain - two recently somewhat successful indie titles - were both made with Game Maker.

Also for 2D games, some people also like Construct 2, but I don't really know much about that one at all except it's supposed to be possible to make games without using code at all.

Another very recent addition is Godot. It's completely free and open source, but apparently a complete bitch to work with at the moment.

Unless you've got experience working with OpenGL in C++ or are quite the programming whiz to begin with, I'd advise not trying to code a game from scratch the first time around. It's a messy and highly involved process. The asset management that the game IDEs I mentioned provide is invaluable until you really get your shit together.

Finally, join up with one of the big indie game websites. (gamejolt, tigsource, uhhh, there's others) and talk to other game devs. There's a lot of us out there these days. Lots of ideas floating around, and lots of people looking to collaborate.

Good luck!

#41 Posted by damnboyadvance (4061 posts) -

If you really don't know anything about computer programming, like I do, I would recommend Python.

I took computer programming last year and our instructor gave us the freedom to choose our own code to research and write on our own. I knew basically nothing about programming, so I chose Python. It's very simple, and you can do some pretty neat stuff with it. I ended up making a Blackjack and Tic-Tac-Toe game for my final projects.

But if you're looking to make games like maybe Angry Birds right now, Python probably won't help you do that. It's just a good start.

#42 Edited by SavageManLove (93 posts) -

After numerous distractions and procrastinating to no end, I finally got a book on Game Maker from the library and sat down for like 6 hours yesterday and went through about 100 pages trying to learn and have fun. That is the most I've gone through a book that was meant to be technical or learn some program or something. I told myself many times that I would "do" this and I'm going to finally try to "do" it. Game Maker is really fun and I can't wait to learn more from this. Focus on this 2d stuff and one program at first and then perhaps later on I can branch out to something else I just don't want to start too many things at once. The issue now is I need to learn how to draw pixel art lol. Any good tutorials out there? I don't really have much art skill but surely I can train myself? I'm not necessarily looking to be "retro" on purpose but just a realization of my limitations as one person.

Thank you in advance. Maybe just maybe I'll find the "fire" and have a desire to live once again eventually through this.

#43 Posted by Bollard (5662 posts) -

After numerous distractions and procrastinating to no end, I finally got a book on Game Maker from the library and sat down for like 6 hours yesterday and went through about 100 pages trying to learn and have fun. That is the most I've gone through a book that was meant to be technical or learn some program or something. I told myself many times that I would "do" this and I'm going to finally try to "do" it. Game Maker is really fun and I can't wait to learn more from this. Focus on this 2d stuff and one program at first and then perhaps later on I can branch out to something else I just don't want to start too many things at once. The issue now is I need to learn how to draw pixel art lol. Any good tutorials out there? I don't really have much art skill but surely I can train myself? I'm not necessarily looking to be "retro" on purpose but just a realization of my limitations as one person.

Thank you in advance. Maybe just maybe I'll find the "fire" and have a desire to live once again eventually through this.

That sounds great dude. GameDev is great fun, hope you get into it.

#44 Posted by Sniipe (110 posts) -

What book did you end up getting and is it any good?

#45 Posted by SavageManLove (93 posts) -

@sniipe: "Getting Started With Game Maker" by Jerry Lee Ford. It's a few years ago but you can still pretty much follow along everything in the book. The amazon reviews seem to be a bit mixed but it's honestly so far been perfect for a complete idiot like me. Understanding objects and instances and all that jazz so far has helped a lot. I didn't buy it but rather got it from a library so perhaps easier to swallow lol? I don't know I like it so far.