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Posted by astrotriforce (1326 posts) -

As a big fan of both Christian rap and metal artists, I've noticed quite a few videogame references popping up in many of the new tracks coming out of the 116 Clique (LeCrae, Trip Lee, Tedashi, Flame, etc.).

This inspired me to put a list together of some of the videogame references featured in songs by Christian metal bands and hip-hop artists that I could think of off the top of my head.

Christian Music Videogame References In Rap and Metal Songs

I compiled them into a list that features the music videos or song videos from youtube as well as the specific videogame reference or rapped line that features a reference from the song.

I know there are more out there, so if anyone can think of others leave a comment and I'll update the list.

#1 Posted by astrotriforce (1326 posts) -

As a big fan of both Christian rap and metal artists, I've noticed quite a few videogame references popping up in many of the new tracks coming out of the 116 Clique (LeCrae, Trip Lee, Tedashi, Flame, etc.).

This inspired me to put a list together of some of the videogame references featured in songs by Christian metal bands and hip-hop artists that I could think of off the top of my head.

Christian Music Videogame References In Rap and Metal Songs

I compiled them into a list that features the music videos or song videos from youtube as well as the specific videogame reference or rapped line that features a reference from the song.

I know there are more out there, so if anyone can think of others leave a comment and I'll update the list.

#2 Posted by TheDudeOfGaming (6078 posts) -

@astrotriforce said:

As a big fan of both Christian rap and metal artists,

Ooookay.

#3 Posted by NlGHTCRAWLER (1210 posts) -

@TheDudeOfGaming said:

@astrotriforce said:

As a big fan of both Christian rap and metal artists,

Ooookay.

Still not as bad as dubstep.

I like some rap and most metal, so i'm not going to spit at it just because it's Chrisitan. Isn't Flyleaf and Paramore Christian bands? They're somewhat awesome and they rock the cross.

#4 Posted by Kierkegaard (605 posts) -

@astrotriforce: No video game references in here, but it's the only video "christian rap" makes me think of.

That said, with no disrespect, I've never been drawn to music with only one idea. Nas, DMX, 2Pac, and many other mainstream rappers make constant reference to Christian themes and beliefs--DMX even has prayer verses at the end of most of his albums, but they don't define themselves as Christian Rappers. Lupe Fiasco and Talib Kweli are Muslim (I know Lupe is; Talib appears to be), but they are not defined by their religion.

Funnily enough, Rap and Country music, while they seem divergent as all hell, are both the most consistently religious in their lyrics, with probably the majority of both being Christian believers.

I guess I fail to see the point, though, in defining oneself by your religion in your music. If your art is merely conversion material, that rubs me the wrong way.

I know you weren't intending to create debate with this, but just wanted to lend my thoughts. Again, no disrespect.

#5 Posted by zudthespud (3284 posts) -
@astrotriforce: I'm interested, do Thrice and Underoath count as christian metal? Never heard any video games in them just interested. I was like Kierkegaard, whenever you hear about christian metal or rap music you tend to cringe but Thrice and Underoath do it really well.
#6 Posted by Yummylee (22587 posts) -

...question of the day guy??

#7 Posted by Jay444111 (2441 posts) -

Wait... what if a person on their sings about SMT Nocturne... will he be thrown out due to... you know... how satanic the game is? Because I want to see that... on youtube if possible... I don't trust new sites.

#8 Posted by Korwin (3045 posts) -

My brain has a hard time reconciling Religious Metal...

#9 Edited by Hunter5024 (5982 posts) -

Hey some of it's good guys, regardless of your religion. I like Demon Hunter.

#10 Posted by DeF (4979 posts) -

So do all the members of those groups have to be called Christian by first name or is it cool of that's one of your middle names? 'Cause otherwise I don't get it.

Or are they all managed by the same dude whose name is Christian?

#11 Posted by GloriousDinosaur (435 posts) -

@astrotriforce: Hey brother, these are my two favourite genres as well. Right now, I am loving some Lecrae, Tedashii and Trip Lee along with some August Burns Red and Demon Hunter. I was actually thinking about this whole topic over the last few days. While I feel that the Empire Midi is a bit of a stretch to call a homage to NES games, I definitely picked up and appreciated the Mario reference on 'The Good Life'.

@Kierkegaard: I think the mental process here from a Christian perspective, is that the gifting and opportunity the artists/bands have been blessed with is a gift from God. As such, their desire is to honour Him through the application of those gifts. Again, from a purely logical Christian perspective, the natural resolution of this situation is either the strengthening of those in the faith (this is where I fall) or the conversion of those not in the faith. I do respect that you were able to respond without flaming as so often happens.

@zudthespud: I don't personally know Thrice, but I do love some heavy Underoath. If you do like that kind of music though, I would suggest you to try our some August Burns Red. They are a Christian band, however, they do not pound their values down your throat and their music is awesome!

@Korwin: It is only a genre of music with Christian lyrics. It is unfortunate that the genre of metal has been characterised by the exact opposite of Christian values and is therefore what people expect when coming to the music. I personally had that impression when I first heard it.

@Hunter5024: Good to see them being appreciated. Now, if only they would come out to Australia...

#12 Posted by PandaBear (1384 posts) -

@Kierkegaard said:

@astrotriforce: No video game references in here, but it's the only video "christian rap" makes me think of.

That said, with no disrespect, I've never been drawn to music with only one idea. Nas, DMX, 2Pac, and many other mainstream rappers make constant reference to Christian themes and beliefs--DMX even has prayer verses at the end of most of his albums, but they don't define themselves as Christian Rappers. Lupe Fiasco and Talib Kweli are Muslim (I know Lupe is; Talib appears to be), but they are not defined by their religion.

Funnily enough, Rap and Country music, while they seem divergent as all hell, are both the most consistently religious in their lyrics, with probably the majority of both being Christian believers.

I guess I fail to see the point, though, in defining oneself by your religion in your music. If your art is merely conversion material, that rubs me the wrong way.

I know you weren't intending to create debate with this, but just wanted to lend my thoughts. Again, no disrespect.

I think you nailed it. I'm an (hardcore) Atheist, but some of the music I love is heavily influenced by religion (Jurassic 5 use Islamic references, Justice are most definitely a Christian outfit) but I don't care. I saw Prince live this year and he preached a lot but was still amazing (yeah, I saw Prince and loved it... don't look at me like that). The thing is though I'd never say "I like Atheist rap or metal" because why put limits like that on music? I have religious friends and their religious focused bands can be so boring. Every song relates back to either it's okay to love God or how cool God is.

"I guess I fail to see the point, though, in defining oneself by your religion in your music. If your art is merely conversion material, that rubs me the wrong way." ... that's how I feel. It's like a group of people constantly reassuring each other "Don't worry, we're so cool! We really are! We got it right! Everyone else is wrong!".

No disrespect intended to OP, people can like whatever they want obviously. But I think to truly embrace the world at large you should drop the "Christian" part and listen to music as a whole.

#13 Posted by GloriousDinosaur (435 posts) -

@PandaBear: That is a very pair post. Personally, I label Christian music based upon the lyrics. I feel that there are so many negative connotations attached to the genres of metal and rap (an by extension, the model of 'christian' metal and rap being so counter-cultural to these stereotypes) that it is important to draw distinctions. The limit that is placed on music is a choice. For me personally, I love both genres, but I choose to only listen to christian artists as I believe they have the most relevant things to say (to me).

It is a choice though. I choose to do things that will remind me of God and my beliefs. This means listening to music with Christian lyrics, reading my bible etc. For me it is lifestyle.

Sorry for the disordered post :(

#14 Posted by afrofools (1335 posts) -

I'm not a fan of religion, but I do love 'Spirit in the Sky' and 'Jesus Walks'. Yes I know they don't mention videogames, but the songs/tracks are great.

#15 Posted by Jrad (624 posts) -

I don't know what I expected, entering this thread. When people talk about Him and gifts from God and Holy Spirits does it sound like a cult to anyone else, or is that just me?

I'm not trying to start anything, OP, but when you say "A simple man on a simple mission, speaking the life-saving words of Christ alongside the passion for the videogames he loves," on your About page, what do you mean, exactly? How are the words of Christ life-saving?

#16 Posted by Elazul (1327 posts) -

@Jrad said:

I don't know what I expected, entering this thread. When people talk about Him and gifts from God and Holy Spirits does it sound like a cult to anyone else, or is that just me?

I'm not trying to start anything, OP, but when you say "A simple man on a simple mission, speaking the life-saving words of Christ alongside the passion for the videogames he loves," on your About page, what do you mean, exactly? How are the words of Christ life-saving?

If you read the entire bible backwards, you become immortal. Fact.

#17 Posted by Korwin (3045 posts) -

@GloriousDinosaur said:

@PandaBear: That is a very pair post. Personally, I label Christian music based upon the lyrics. I feel that there are so many negative connotations attached to the genres of metal and rap (an by extension, the model of 'christian' metal and rap being so counter-cultural to these stereotypes) that it is important to draw distinctions.

The reason the "negative" connotations are attached to those genre's are they were created to be counter cultural by nature. Both of these genre's sprung out of other genre's driven by an artists desire to explore darks, harsher emotions and and to give voice to the bleaker parts of the human experience. To pick them up and turn them on their head with a warm fuzzy "Yay Jesus/Mohammad/Josesph Smith or whatever" theme undermines the very basis of what those particular forms of artist expression are about at their core.

#18 Posted by Jaytow (708 posts) -

Cuz rap is the language of todays youth, yo.

#19 Posted by ValiantGrizzly (497 posts) -

MyChildren MyBride - Headshot is a song about playing Halo.

Also there are great Christian metal bands who do not force their ideas on people. I'm an atheist and I love The Chariot, Norma Jean, August Burns Red, The Devil Wears Prada, Underoath etcetera.

#20 Posted by matti00 (675 posts) -

I'm not Christian, there are some avowed Christian bands I really like, but I'm just saying... If I *was* Christian, I would wear the shit out of that Bible Warfare t-shirt.

#21 Posted by Brodehouse (10138 posts) -

I think it's pretty hilarious how people still think metal is about Satan. It's mostly about anger. And then the band gets older and it either turns into anger about society or politics, or just morphs into whatever their personal interests are. Blind Guardian are a bunch of fantasy nerds. Steve Harris of Iron Maiden is a big war history nerd so the majority of the songs are about fighter planes scrambling during the Blitz or Saxons fighting off Viking pillagers. Of course there would be metal hands whose interest is Jesus.


Also that first Stryper album is pretty awesome.

#22 Posted by believer258 (12213 posts) -

The MIDI version of August Burns Red's Empire has nothing to do with video games. In the description in the booklet, the author mentions that he could have made some money making video game music back in the 8 and 16 bit days - but that's just a one-off acknowledgement of the resemblance.

@zudthespud said:

@astrotriforce: I'm interested, do Thrice and Underoath count as christian metal? Never heard any video games in them just interested. I was like Kierkegaard, whenever you hear about christian metal or rap music you tend to cringe but Thrice and Underoath do it really well.

Underoath says they're Christians, though that label doesn't permeate all of their music. A good number of their songs don't really even seem to reference Christianity.

#23 Posted by Meowshi (2911 posts) -

@Korwin said:

@GloriousDinosaur said:

@PandaBear: That is a very pair post. Personally, I label Christian music based upon the lyrics. I feel that there are so many negative connotations attached to the genres of metal and rap (an by extension, the model of 'christian' metal and rap being so counter-cultural to these stereotypes) that it is important to draw distinctions.

The reason the "negative" connotations are attached to those genre's are they were created to be counter cultural by nature. Both of these genre's sprung out of other genre's driven by an artists desire to explore darks, harsher emotions and and to give voice to the bleaker parts of the human experience. To pick them up and turn them on their head with a warm fuzzy "Yay Jesus/Mohammad/Josesph Smith or whatever" theme undermines the very basis of what those particular forms of artist expression are about at their core.

Why do I feel like you would not be saying the same thing if this was a thread about Metal featuring Norse mythology and Asatru/Neopagan worship?

@Jrad said:

I don't know what I expected, entering this thread. When people talk about Him and gifts from God and Holy Spirits does it sound like a cult to anyone else, or is that just me?

Well, those are common religious ideas so I'm not really sure what you're getting at. Cultism is usually described as something that is particularly unusual or aberrant, and there's not really the case here.

#24 Edited by Ravenlight (8011 posts) -

I only enjoy music that directly references wizards.

#25 Posted by Ace829 (2083 posts) -

@Yummylee said:

...question of the day guy??

Exactly what I was thinking! Been a while seen I've seen em.

#26 Posted by blueduck (964 posts) -
#27 Posted by McGhee (6075 posts) -

hey, it's astrotriforce

#28 Posted by MrKlorox (11209 posts) -

The thread title confused me. At first I thought it was asking for christian rap/metal references in videogames. I think it would be pretty awesome to see a videogame rip on DC Talk.

#29 Posted by BraveToaster (12588 posts) -

What a blatantly obvious way of advertising your site.

#30 Posted by mikethekilla (328 posts) -

I honestly surprised that this hasn't went to shit already.

#31 Posted by OneKillWonder_ (1840 posts) -

There are a number of Christian metal and rock bands that I like quite a bit. While I'm not religious in any way, the fact that these bands are Christian is completely incidental to my enjoyment of them. What I can't stand is when these bands, instead of focusing on writing great music, are too busy trying to shove their beliefs down their listeners' throats. Bands like Red, P.O.D. and Pillar usually tend to steer clear of doing that. The latest Demon Hunter album got a little too preachy in spots, which they never really have been before, but it's easy to ignore. 
 
Still, the Christian music scene has a negative stigma, and for the most part, rightfully so. Most of that shit is unbelievably cheesy and fucking embarrassing to listen to and not really about the music, but unfortunately that generalization gets the handful of great bands overlooked by a lot of people who would probably otherwise enjoy them. Good music is good music.

#32 Posted by CrossTheAtlantic (1146 posts) -

@PandaBear: Never, ever ever ever ever think liking Prince is a bad thing. I am so jealous you saw him.

#33 Posted by Apparatus_Unearth (3251 posts) -

August Burns Red is dope, so are a lot of the Christian metalcore bands from my area. But when it comes to rap, I'm not into it.

#34 Posted by mscupcakes (612 posts) -

I'm more of a fan of Hindu Funk.

#35 Posted by Mixwizzard (82 posts) -

>Christian rap

>Christian metal

#36 Posted by the_OFFICIAL_jAPanese_teaBAG (4284 posts) -
@Yummylee said:

...question of the day guy??

YESSSS!  I still remember those.....
#37 Posted by Barrock (3553 posts) -

I couldn't fathom a life where I only listened to one specific sub genre of music. It's great that you're a Christian and find that uplifting. But why can't you listen to music that doesn't reaffirm your beliefs? I'm not saying listen to anti Christian music, just non Christian.

#38 Posted by Vinny_Says (5721 posts) -

@Barrock said:

I couldn't fathom a life where I only listened to one specific sub genre of music. It's great that you're a Christian and find that uplifting. But why can't you listen to music that doesn't reaffirm your beliefs? I'm not saying listen to anti Christian music, just non Christian.

Maybe he listens to more than just christian rap & metal but just so happened to notice video game references in a particular type.

#39 Posted by Kierkegaard (605 posts) -

@GloriousDinosaur said:

@astrotriforce: Hey brother, these are my two favourite genres as well. Right now, I am loving some Lecrae, Tedashii and Trip Lee along with some August Burns Red and Demon Hunter. I was actually thinking about this whole topic over the last few days. While I feel that the Empire Midi is a bit of a stretch to call a homage to NES games, I definitely picked up and appreciated the Mario reference on 'The Good Life'.

@Kierkegaard: I think the mental process here from a Christian perspective, is that the gifting and opportunity the artists/bands have been blessed with is a gift from God. As such, their desire is to honour Him through the application of those gifts. Again, from a purely logical Christian perspective, the natural resolution of this situation is either the strengthening of those in the faith (this is where I fall) or the conversion of those not in the faith. I do respect that you were able to respond without flaming as so often happens.

@zudthespud: I don't personally know Thrice, but I do love some heavy Underoath. If you do like that kind of music though, I would suggest you to try our some August Burns Red. They are a Christian band, however, they do not pound their values down your throat and their music is awesome!

@Korwin: It is only a genre of music with Christian lyrics. It is unfortunate that the genre of metal has been characterised by the exact opposite of Christian values and is therefore what people expect when coming to the music. I personally had that impression when I first heard it.

@Hunter5024: Good to see them being appreciated. Now, if only they would come out to Australia...

(Responding to the bit directed at me) Right, and athletes point to the sky and thank God for stuff, too. I think calling this the logical solution to being a musician of faith may be overstepping. Someone believing in a higher meaning does not necessarily mean that they should proselytize their beliefs in their art or in their life. I just think it should be noted that this process of creation is what *some* Christians have done, but, as there are billions of people who would label themselves Christian, most have not. It's not wrong either way, but I take issue with the idea that there are only two ways to resolve a love of God and the ability to do cool stuff.

There are way more than two ways. The power of faith, in anything, as I see it is not in strengthening an insular community or reaching out to those who do not believe the same thing, but in acting on the good philosophy of that faith to be a nice person, do good things, and help people. It's idealistic, but I would rather Christians, musicians or not, truly take the good bits of their religious philosophy (treat everyone as you want to be treated, don't fret over material possessions) and act that way than repeat the words to themselves and others or, worse, act like the words are what matter rather than the actions they inspire.

I'm not assuming you are anything but a nice, good person whose faith strengthens that in you. I am saying that a rap song about converting Jews and Gentiles (which is in the OP's list) is not the way to make anyone interested in Christian music.

I know, heady stuff when the thread is about video game references in Christian songs. But, my avatar is mu-fucking Socrates, so it's kinda my thing.

#40 Posted by Jrad (624 posts) -

@Meowshi said:

@Jrad said:

I don't know what I expected, entering this thread. When people talk about Him and gifts from God and Holy Spirits does it sound like a cult to anyone else, or is that just me?

Well, those are common religious ideas so I'm not really sure what you're getting at. Cultism is usually described as something that is particularly unusual or aberrant, and there's not really the case here.

It's probably because I grew up completely without religion — most religious things come across as bizarre and odd. The ritualistic parts especially, like clasping your hands in prayer or drawing a cross, and when people start capitalizing personal pronouns for no reason and venerating the "Holy Spirit" (which sounds like something out of a bad Final Fantasy game, or Native American mythology) I can't help but raise an eyebrow in skepticism. I don't think I'll ever really understand religion, which is a shame; it seems to work quite well for most people.

#41 Posted by Meowshi (2911 posts) -

@blueduck said:

You do realize you're agreeing with the out-of-touch old redneck in this situation right? Did you even watch this episode?

@Jrad said:

@Meowshi said:

@Jrad said:

I don't know what I expected, entering this thread. When people talk about Him and gifts from God and Holy Spirits does it sound like a cult to anyone else, or is that just me?

Well, those are common religious ideas so I'm not really sure what you're getting at. Cultism is usually described as something that is particularly unusual or aberrant, and that's not really the case here.

It's probably because I grew up completely without religion — most religious things come across as bizarre and odd. The ritualistic parts especially, like clasping your hands in prayer or drawing a cross, and when people start capitalizing personal pronouns for no reason and venerating the "Holy Spirit" (which sounds like something out of a bad Final Fantasy game, or Native American mythology) I can't help but raise an eyebrow in skepticism. I don't think I'll ever really understand religion, which is a shame; it seems to work quite well for most people.

I gathered as much. I suppose when I use the word "cult", I'm thinking of UFOs, poisoned kool-aid, and body thetans; rather than religion in general.

#42 Posted by Rainbowkisses (467 posts) -

I @Korwin said:

The reason the "negative" connotations are attached to those genre's are they were created to be counter cultural by nature. Both of these genre's sprung out of other genre's driven by an artists desire to explore darks, harsher emotions and and to give voice to the bleaker parts of the human experience. To pick them up and turn them on their head with a warm fuzzy "Yay Jesus/Mohammad/Josesph Smith or whatever" theme undermines the very basis of what those particular forms of artist expression are about at their core.

This is pretty much my thought on the majority of contemporary Christian music. With that said, even as an atheist I have to admit that some Christian music is damn catchy.

#43 Posted by CornBREDX (6081 posts) -

There's a lot of questioning why "Christian Music" labels itself such. 
 
It's pretty simple. They do it for the money. The label means anyone who is christian that goes into a music store or christian based store will be more likely to buy it (and there is a lot of those). It generally also means it is safe for your kids to listen to. Its much easier to believe a band is "safe" if they say they are christian and you are christian too. 
 
Don't take this as a flame. It's just a fact of life. It makes nailing down their audience very easy. 
 
To help you believe I understand these things, growing up all I was allowed to listen to was christian music. Granted my father is a huge fan of Metal and I was allowed to listen to classic rock, metal, and whatnot. But for the most part all I had was christian music. Which was ok at the time, for what it is and how old I was. 
 
I also went to christian concerts, much like wood stock or Oz Fest or something, that were centered around christian music where we'd camp out for a week and just hang out and listen to music and... buy stuff. I was a volunteer at those so I also worked security at them for several years which is how my family got to go to them for free. They were a lot of fun. 
 
I am not a christian myself these days, more of an agnostic, but I understand the belief system very well and still find belief systems very fascinating. There's nothing entirely wrong with the label, but as with all things, it really just boils down to money. Some of the producers are more legit then others, but ultimately one of the easiest ways to tell your target audience you are something they can relate to and feel safe with is by labeling yourself that way. The music has it's merits as well. Even if you don't agree with what they are saying, some of them are legitimately good artists and often just really feel passionate about their beliefs. Some have even broken out into "secular" genres. POD and Amy Grant off the top of my head as an example. 
 
So, anyway. That is why they label themself "Christian Music" even when it's not always all about their God (which, lets be a bit more honest here, most of it is about that, but they also talk a lot about morality, hard life decisions, and common sense which these days is a good thing as it no longer seems as common).

Online
#44 Posted by csl316 (9523 posts) -

So like, Insane Clown Posse?

#45 Posted by believer258 (12213 posts) -

@CornBREDX said:

There's a lot of questioning why "Christian Music" labels itself such.

It's pretty simple. They do it for the money. The label means anyone who is christian that goes into a music store or christian based store will be more likely to buy it (and there is a lot of those). It generally also means it is safe for your kids to listen to. Its much easier to believe a band is "safe" if they say they are christian and you are christian too.

Don't take this as a flame. It's just a fact of life. It makes nailing down their audience very easy.

To help you believe I understand these things, growing up all I was allowed to listen to was christian music. Granted my father is a huge fan of Metal and I was allowed to listen to classic rock, metal, and whatnot. But for the most part all I had was christian music. Which was ok at the time, for what it is and how old I was. I also went to christian concerts, much like wood stock or Oz Fest or something, that were centered around christian music where we'd camp out for a week and just hang out and listen to music and... buy stuff. I was a volunteer at those so I also worked security at them for several years which is how my family got to go to them for free. They were a lot of fun. I am not a christian myself these days, more of an agnostic, but I understand the belief system very well and still find belief systems very fascinating. There's nothing entirely wrong with the label, but as with all things, it really just boils down to money. Some of the producers are more legit then others, but ultimately one of the easiest ways to tell your target audience you are something they can relate to and feel safe with is by labeling yourself that way. The music has it's merits as well. Even if you don't agree with what they are saying, some of them are legitimately good artists and often just really feel passionate about their beliefs. Some have even broken out into "secular" genres. POD and Amy Grant off the top of my head as an example. So, anyway. That is why they label themself "Christian Music" even when it's not always all about their God (which, lets be a bit more honest here, most of it is about that, but they also talk a lot about morality, hard life decisions, and common sense which these days is a good thing as it no longer seems as common).

That's probably the best and most reasonable comment on this entire thread about the label "Christian music".

#46 Posted by CornBREDX (6081 posts) -
@csl316 said:
So like, Insane Clown Posse?
To this day, I find it really weird they came out and said they were christian and straight up in one of their songs said it was all about God the whole time.  
It turned out Disturbed was christian too.
Online
#47 Posted by corganmurray (35 posts) -

@GloriousDinosaur said:

...a purely logical Christian perspective...

#48 Posted by blueduck (964 posts) -
@Meowshi said:

@blueduck said:

You do realize you're agreeing with the out-of-touch old redneck in this situation right? Did you even watch this episode?

@Jrad said:

@Meowshi said:

@Jrad said:

I don't know what I expected, entering this thread. When people talk about Him and gifts from God and Holy Spirits does it sound like a cult to anyone else, or is that just me?

Well, those are common religious ideas so I'm not really sure what you're getting at. Cultism is usually described as something that is particularly unusual or aberrant, and that's not really the case here.

It's probably because I grew up completely without religion — most religious things come across as bizarre and odd. The ritualistic parts especially, like clasping your hands in prayer or drawing a cross, and when people start capitalizing personal pronouns for no reason and venerating the "Holy Spirit" (which sounds like something out of a bad Final Fantasy game, or Native American mythology) I can't help but raise an eyebrow in skepticism. I don't think I'll ever really understand religion, which is a shame; it seems to work quite well for most people.

I gathered as much. I suppose when I use the word "cult", I'm thinking of UFOs, poisoned kool-aid, and body thetans; rather than religion in general.

Did you watch the episode? because the ending clearly points out Hanks overall opinion on the matter. Also the fact that  you're calling him an old red neck clearly means you don't actually watch the show. 
#49 Posted by JazGalaxy (1576 posts) -

I also listen to almost exclusively christian music.

I also listen to Bad Religion, though, because they're one of the greatest punk bands that ever was. And, yeah, almost all their songs are exclusively anti-religious.

Christian rock bands aren't any different than any cause-related musical genre. Protest music, social issue-based music (LBGT for istance) and environmental music are all the same. Even hate music, really.

Christian music exist for the same purpose. I can assure you it ISN'T money, as the poorly informed guy above attested. Sure, 1 out of 5000 christian rock bands might be able to make a living, but most of them rarely make more than one album. One of my favorite christian bands, Five Iron Frenzy, made like 10 records, played all around the country and even had a few of their songs on television only to quit due to having to pay off loans and whatnot.

#50 Posted by JazGalaxy (1576 posts) -

@CornBREDX said:

@csl316 said:
So like, Insane Clown Posse?
To this day, I find it really weird they came out and said they were christian and straight up in one of their songs said it was all about God the whole time. It turned out Disturbed was christian too.

Insane Clown Posse is totally NOT Christian. I knwo they said that, but they are also crazy people.

It takes more to be a christian than just saying you are. You have to actually follow the way of Christ.

ICP calling themselves christian is no different than a meat eating person calling themself a vegetarian.