#1 Posted by rachelepithet (1391 posts) -

I guess I might just be in a shitty news area, cause my local news, and I mean every channel, from Time Warner to CW to ABC to NBC, every employee talks in that phony, almost brainwashing Schweaty Balls/Nancy Grace voice... that fake overacting over annunciating Grace Kelly/Kat Hepburn voice. It's especially creepy when it's the 23 year old rookie field reporter, and worse, when he has to use WWE's Jim Ross's "Owen Hart voice" (dead wrestler) when covering a tragedy worthy of the Simpsons. (Seriously, someone in Troy New York has cut the head off an Uncle Sam statue tonight.)

I ask, because most of the time I've seen other regions local news teams on YouTube and such, whether an animal blooper or weather blooper or a funny sports call, a lot of these teams seem to talk normally, not like robots, like they have their own personalities, like they're having fun, like they're drinking buddies outside work. They come off more like morning TV (Regis and Strahan and whatever) than night news (Trisha Takanawa).

What's yours like?

#2 Posted by TruthTellah (9100 posts) -

My local news depends on the time of day. In the morning it's much more casual, and they talk like normal/inebriated people. In the evening, they're generally normal and maybe a little tired. For the last broadcast of the day, they talk about almost all serious stories, bringing in people who speak more monotone and fact-based. The different styles have their uses throughout the day.

#3 Posted by Blu3V3nom07 (4208 posts) -

My local news is okay. They're probably more boring NPR than I should give them credit for. Texas.
Anyway, who gives a shit?! Let's watch what my local news put up once!

That was a random day learning about this in class from my teacher.

#4 Posted by Littleg (68 posts) -

I'm not too familiar with NPR, most of the stuff I've heard is people talking very quietly, like they're the late night call-in DJ on a radio station - is that what you mean?

What I will say is that, whenever I've visited the US, I've always been struck by how oddly all the News presenters speak. Sounds like there was one super popular news presenter 20 years ago that they're all trying to copy, or as if people can't absorb news unless it's delivered with crazy cadencing and peculiar emphases. And that's before we start talking about sports presenters.

It's probably the same in the UK, but we just don't notice it because we're used to it. If I really think about it, a lot of the news guys sound like teachers, in a way.

#5 Posted by Nictel (2412 posts) -

I just know that they can do a seamless segue from hundreds of women and children being brutally raped and murdered to talk about a possible affaire that a random "star" may or may not have had.

#6 Edited by BBAlpert (1475 posts) -

I think more media outlets should adopt Vinny's TV voice as their standard. Or Jeff's hardcore announcer voice.

Start at 1:20 if it doesn't do so automatically.

#7 Posted by Brodehouse (9950 posts) -

I love that speaking in a sotto voice is 'pretentious'. They sound exactly the same as every other newscaster's non-regional diction (which is why as some people noted they all sound the same) except they speak more softly. If they're pretentious it's because of the CONTENT, not because they speak in a sotto voice.

#8 Posted by Claude (16254 posts) -

I have plenty of choices when it comes to local news. But I like the one I watch on CBS. WBTV where I live. They're from Charlotte, NC. They seem down to earth and they're on your side.

#9 Posted by oldenglishC (957 posts) -

My local news is more into drawing cock than speaking clearly.

They come off more like morning TV (Regis and Strahan and whatever) than night news (Trisha Takanawa).

Local news anchor Jane Park > Trisha Takanawa.

#10 Posted by CaLe (3985 posts) -

My local news people sound like the guy talking to David Blaine here.

#11 Posted by JouselDelka (967 posts) -

@cale: That was so refreshing and energetic, love it.

#12 Posted by GERALTITUDE (3327 posts) -

No, that would be funnier though.