Posted by falserelic (5412 posts) 2 months, 29 days ago

Poll: Do you think exercising for long periods of time is unhealthy for you? (113 votes)

Not for me at all, if I got it I'll go for it. 29%
I don't think working out for along time is necessary, I wouldn't do it. 44%
I'm not into fitness, but I want to see the results. 27%

Since I have 3 days off of work I'm just going hard into the gym. Today, I did legs and abs then went swimming for cardio. I only was there for an hour long because the leg exercises took its toll on me, and swimming was draining me aswell. As for tomorrow I'm doing straight up Cardio for 6 or 8 hours. I want to get as much training before going back to work Thursday, and besides I have nothing better else to do (No ps4 or real social life).

I know some people will think that's crazy, which is understandable. For me I'm not a normal person when it comes to fitness. I like pushing myself and going beyond of what I can do. Lately, I've been eating clean and its paying off. I'm starting to get slimmer and it feels aswome.

#1 Posted by MooseyMcMan (10915 posts) -

You definitely have to push yourself if you want results, but pushing too far is definitely bad for you. But I don't know anything about fitness (I've been trying (and failing) for years to get into shape).

Moderator
#2 Edited by Hunkulese (2702 posts) -

If you're already a fitness freak why are you asking this? Especially on a video game forum. Did you become a fitness freak in the last week?

Listen to your body and you'll be fine.

#3 Edited by benspyda (2033 posts) -

It can be. Athletes that push themselves too hard need knee replacements and such because of how they are pushing their bodies. There is nothing wrong with exercising every day but anything out of balance in your life can have a negative result.

#4 Posted by falserelic (5412 posts) -

If you're already a fitness freak why are you asking this? Especially on a video game forum. Did you become a fitness freak in the last week?

Listen to your body and you'll be fine.

I have a passion for it, and its cool to see other fellow gamers into fitness aswell. I used to be one of those fat chubby gamers, but changed that two years ago. I've been a fitness freak for quite sometime now.

#5 Edited by leebmx (2238 posts) -

I don't really understand what you mean by 8 hours cardio. Are you going to do two marathons? That seems stupid. Exercise isn't something where you can do a week's worth in a day and then relax for 6 days. You will just end up injuring yourself and not really do that much good.

#6 Edited by Seppli (10251 posts) -

I take a break every couple of days. Sometimes two days. The body definitely needs a break from workouts every now and then. Some basic cardio, like taking a brisk walk or a bike ride, is never out of place though.

#7 Edited by falserelic (5412 posts) -

@leebmx said:

I don't really understand what you mean by 8 hours cardio. Are you going to do two marathons? That seems stupid. Exercise isn't something where you can do a week's worth in a day and then relax for 6 days. You will just end up injuring yourself and not really do that much good.

I've done 6 hours before. I was on the elliptical for 3 hours, treadmill for 2, and on the bike for 1. It was a pain in the ass, but payed off for me in the end. Since I'm at a new gym I'm planning on trying out all the cardio machines and listening to music, also I workout everyday.

#8 Edited by CodeHero (134 posts) -

I personally wouldn't do it. Off the top of my head I think the biggest issue you could face is rhabdomyolysis, and I don't think you want dialysis.

#9 Edited by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

Exercising for any period of time is unhealthy for me.

#10 Posted by VoshiNova (1677 posts) -

Rock on man! Living a healthy life is something I think everyone would like to do, as it leads to good moods and a longer lifespan.

But it takes hard work and diligence to stick to it, so congrats on kickin' ass duder.

Oh, and I don't know if it's unhealthy - I'd say the obvious answer is no, but under certain conditions I could see someone hurting themselves.

#11 Posted by spraynardtatum (2826 posts) -

Just don't try to be Bruce Lee and you should be good.

#12 Posted by CorruptedEvil (2698 posts) -

You will strain your muscles more than you should, especially if you don't usually exercise anywhere near that much.

#13 Edited by ripelivejam (3816 posts) -

Listen to your body and you'll be fine.

this is what mine says:

#14 Posted by Molenator85 (222 posts) -

Don't exercise sore muscles, that's pretty much the only rule I have.

#15 Posted by cmblasko (1198 posts) -

Man, I can barely do 15 minutes of cardio before getting bored. Doing 6-8 hours of cardio doesn't sound like it would be very good for your heart, though. Everyone's body is different, though, so if it works for you then go for it.

#16 Posted by Vinny_Says (5700 posts) -

What exactly is your goal here? NBA players train 4 hours a day, runners train for 6-8 hours every day....

Seems like you just want to lose weight and not be the fastest, strongest, meanest guy on the court/ring/rink/track/pool...eating less and doing one hour of cardio every day is enough to achieve weight loss.

But hey, it doesn't hurt to exercise, as long as you keep it consistent and get enough rest it's all gravy.

#17 Posted by falserelic (5412 posts) -

What exactly is your goal here? NBA players train 4 hours a day, runners train for 6-8 hours every day....

Seems like you just want to lose weight and not be the fastest, strongest, meanest guy on the court/ring/rink/track/pool...eating less and doing one hour of cardio every day is enough to achieve weight loss.

But hey, it doesn't hurt to exercise, as long as you keep it consistent and get enough rest it's all gravy.

As of now I'm planning on getting lean and ripped. The 6-8 is just for this week since I'm not working for two more days. Once I've gotten to a weight I'm satisfied with then I'm bulking. That will be my true goal and it will take time. I want to change who I am physically and mentally. Last year was kinda a waste of time with my weight loss progression, and I'm not looking to repeat that same mistake again.

#18 Posted by Fyrtail (14 posts) -

Hey, as long as you rest when you're tired and drink a bit when you're thirsty, I figure you're okay! Though I've never taken on that much exercise in a day myself. Good luck!

#19 Posted by alwaysbebombing (1572 posts) -

I don't think, science tells me there is a limit.

#20 Posted by JasonR86 (9658 posts) -

It depends.

How do you like that for an answer?

#21 Edited by NTM (7344 posts) -

It's recommended that people, adults, with moderate intensity, work out with for 30 minutes to two hours a day. You want to raise the heartbeat, but not become fatigued. If you work out too much, it can lead to injuries, exhaustion, even depression, etc. (which sounds like the antithesis of what you want). Yes though, having a more appropriate weight, or after doing a simple workout, you can feel better and happier.

#22 Posted by Legend (2658 posts) -

@falserelic: You should probably consult an expert like a doctor before pushing yourself like that. Working out suddenly for such a long time may have bad consequences even if it for one day only.

#23 Edited by falserelic (5412 posts) -

@jasonr86 said:

It depends.

How do you like that for an answer?

If it floats your boat.

@ntm said:

It's recommended that people, adults, with moderate intensity, work out with for 30 minutes to two hours a day. You want to raise the heartbeat, but not become fatigued. If you work out too much, it can lead to injuries, exhaustion, even depression, etc. (which sounds like the antithesis of what you want). Yes though, having a more appropriate weight, or after doing a simple workout, you can feel better and happier.

I've been suffering from depression for years, but going to the gym always helped put my mind at ease. Any anger that I have going on I release it at the gym. It keeps me from thinking about smoking or drinking alcohol when I get stressed.

#24 Posted by Brendan (7775 posts) -

Over-exercise is as bad as under-exercise. If you get injured then you end up not being able to exercise for longer than you would if you took things carefully. If you like being active and out-and-about, then I recommend getting a vigorous but measured exercise schedule and then also going out for walks/hikes/light bike rides. Make sure to stretch!

Make sure to stretch!

Make sure to stretch!

#25 Posted by NTM (7344 posts) -

@falserelic: I kind of knew this, but still, I don't know the descriptions behind some, except for endorphins.

http://blog.bufferapp.com/why-exercising-makes-us-happier

#26 Edited by falserelic (5412 posts) -

@brendan said:

Over-exercise is as bad as under-exercise. If you get injured then you end up not being able to exercise for longer than you would if you took things carefully. If you like being active and out-and-about, then I recommend getting a vigorous but measured exercise schedule and then also going out for walks/hikes/light bike rides. Make sure to stretch!

Make sure to stretch!

Make sure to stretch!

I usually get a good stretch from walking 30 minutes to the gym. While walking through a unsettling path filled with bugs, tall grass, weird animals. I wouldn't be shocked if I get attacked by a snake one of these days or something else. The tall grass is the only thing that can make me feel uneasy. The 2nd thing is going inside the locker room at the gym, feels weird being in a room filled with naked men.

#27 Edited by Aetheldod (3555 posts) -

Anything in excess is bad for you.But different bodies have different tolerances , mine for example couldnt handle that much because I had surgery in the aorta and had a big chunk cut off so I have less resistance than other people , I can try as hard as anyone but soon enough I would be out of air and aching all over the body.

#28 Edited by Cerberus3Dog (331 posts) -

Wow, look at that split. It's 33% across the board at the moment. First time I've seen that happen.

Too much is as bad if not worse than too little. As well as lifting and exercising properly. I have four degenerative disks in my back from weight lifting improperly. Don't fuck up your body. It's the only one you got.

#29 Posted by Triumvir (474 posts) -

Soreness and fatigue are fine; they are part of pushing yourself and increasing strength and endurance. If you pay attention to your body, use proper form and technique, and stop/rest at the slightest hint of real pain, you will run into injury or ill effects only very rarely.

That said, if you are running long distances every day and such, it's going to take its toll on your knees, hips, and ankles. Ditto for heavy lifting, even with proper form. Again, listen to your body and rest when you need to. A week on the couch playing video games and some light walking instead of running won't kill you, and, even then, those sorts of injuries usually only result from years and years of intense physical training. Unless you are pushing forty or fifty or are a pro-athelete, I don't think you'd have any problems with a sensible, if vigorous, routine.

#30 Posted by falserelic (5412 posts) -

@ntm said:

@falserelic: I kind of knew this, but still, I don't know the descriptions behind some, except for endorphins.

http://blog.bufferapp.com/why-exercising-makes-us-happier

That's an interesting article, thanks for posting it. Seems like my brain is program to do this now. I basically kinda lost my mind in a good way.

#31 Posted by Slag (4261 posts) -

There's a difference between training and exercise. Exercise is just maintaining where you're at, training is what it takes to get better at competingand training, especially for high level athletes, takes a lot of time.

Still there is a smart way to train and usually that's a gradual build up into longer and longer sessions. It's not a light switch you can go from zero to six hours like that without repercussions to your joints or muscles.

Going crazy hard for a couple days for a super long time and then nothing sounds like a great way to get hurt if you ask me.

I think you'd better off doing something every day and doing a little extra on your days off. And then work your way into longer and longer sessions.

If you got nothing to do, maybe you can scratch exercise itch by playing some sports or something? Go Box or play some soccer or some Hoops or something?

#32 Posted by Dr_Monocle (101 posts) -

I do 2 days of cardio then yoga on the third day. Yoga is great.

I used to run a lot more often in college but it was hurting my knees a bit. They sound like velcro when I bend and I'm only 27...As others have mentioned: everything in moderation.

#33 Posted by falserelic (5412 posts) -

@slag said:

There's a difference between training and exercise. Exercise is just maintaining where you're at, training is what it takes to get better at competingand training, especially for high level athletes, takes a lot of time.

Still there is a smart way to train and usually that's a gradual build up into longer and longer sessions. It's not a light switch you can go from zero to six hours like that without repercussions to your joints or muscles.

Going crazy hard for a couple days for a super long time and then nothing sounds like a great way to get hurt if you ask me.

I think you'd better off doing something every day and doing a little extra on your days off. And then work your way into longer and longer sessions.

If you got nothing to do, maybe you can scratch exercise itch by playing some sports or something? Go Box or play some soccer or some Hoops or something?

Even though I'm a tall guy and look like I enjoy sports. I just never got into it except for boxing and UFC. A few times at work my co-workers would try to engage in a conversation with me about sports, and I'll pretend like I enjoying watching sports when I don't. When I was in a martial arts school when I was younger I enjoyed watching fights, but didn't care for basketball, football, baseball, soccer etc.

Anyway, after thinking about it I'll die down my workout to 3 hours, and probably go walk to different places. I might go buy a ps vita after my workout session.

#34 Posted by ViciousBearMauling (1039 posts) -

Over exercise is a real thing. Learn your body's limits and strive to push them, but not to an extreme amount.

I've seen a lot of people suffer from over exercise. Hell, even my father had a heart attack because he thought he was still 20 when he was 60 and was lifting too many heavy weights.

I haven't suffered from anything too serious, but I generally feel that I've gone too far if one of my senses start to get hazy (Not feeling a certain part of your body, blurry vision, things like that.)

#35 Posted by Zleunamme (655 posts) -

Over exercising can cause injuries. It is great that you are improving yourself by living a healthier life. Know that your body has limitations. Taking time to recover from an injury slows your progress down. Consult with a doctor first then a personal trainer to help you get the most out of your work out.

#36 Posted by Phr4nk0 (349 posts) -

You should give yourself some clear goals and work towards them. You said you did legs and abs today, with some cardio afterwards. Depending on what you classify as cardio you could already be shooting yourself in the foot. You should think of training as evolving your body, you're trying to go in both directions here, it's not going to work. It's very hard to get good in all aspects of performance even when training optimally, messing around usually just leads to burning out and discouragement. Training is just as much about doing it smart as doing it with intensity.

1. Separate the type of training you are doing. This is counter to what most people will say but it is the quickest and best way to get results. Think about it, when you try to hurry and fumble about trying to learn or do 5 different things at once, you end up taking shortcuts and messing things up. Take it step by step and everything will be done to the best of your ability and properly. This is key, when training I don't train just to train, I train to get better. If I'm not going to the best of my ability then I'm not making progress, and I'm wasting time. When you train, focus on one thing at a time, be it technique, speed, stamina, strength, flexibility or whatever. Making proper progress in one will help out the others without the need for mixing yourself up.

This means that if you're doing weights, do weights and don't do cardio straight after. Say you pushed yourself with some squats, great! You're sending stimulus to your muscles to get bigger and stronger, you need to be able to exert more energy! Now not 30 minutes later your huffing on a treadmill, uh oh... now you're telling them to streamline and be more energy efficient. You're sending mixed messages and getting nowhere. You need to give your body time to act on these messages before cancelling them out with another.

Do weights one day, eat, sleep, recover... Now cardio the next day, eat sleep recover. Repeat. Now you are giving your body time to recover and react to the stimuli your sending it, then sending it another which it can react to in turn. Instead of doing both and getting nowhere. If you've got nothing going on you could split your workout into weight or running in the early morning, eat and have a nap, wake up and later on in the day you could do the other. You're still giving your body the building blocks it needs and some time to follow the instructions your exercise has given it, instead of just sending two sets of contradictory instructions at once.

2. What type of cardio are you doing? There is no way you can train with any kind of intensity for 8 hours. Cardio is cardio, as in cardiovascular endurance. You push your heart hard for 8 hours and just about anyone is liable to suffer a heart attack. If you're saying cardio but really mean walking or slow jog on the treadmill then you're really just burning calories, which is fine, but why not take an easier and more effective approach and just cut some of the calories you still in and save yourself from wearing out your knee joints unnecessarily. Energy is at a premium, especially if you're trying to excel in multiple opposing areas of fitness. The hours of unnecessary cardio just serve to wear out your body so come tomorrow or later in the day when you hit the weights you're not at your peak and can't push yourself to make those gains in the strength department.

One of the hardest things to realise is that you have to be as efficient in your training as possible. Which seems to fly in the face of what most people think of when they think exercise. It's all about wasting as much energy as possible right? This can get you to a decent level, but if your the type of person that wants to do cardio for 8 hours, you're probably not the kind of person that wants average results.

3. Use the 90/10 rule. 90% or your results come from 10% of your training. Focus on the main thing you are training, and get rid of the mess. If you train legs, do your squats and deadlifts. These two moves will give you 90% of your leg development, now you could waste another hour hitting the leg press, calf raises, hack squats, glute ham raise and whatever else for the last 10%. Or you could save all that effort go home, recover and put it towards your cardio later, giving you a better cardio workout. Again, efficiency leaves you with better results, quicker.

Go home, eat your steak and vegies. Maybe a protein shake, get enough rest. Thats 90% of your recovery, you could waste your time and money getting preworkouts, intra-workouts, post workout recoverys, bcaa's, this and that new product that boosts your gains! etc etc. It's not lies, but so many people waste their time and money on that, the stuff that gives you 10% without nailing the easier 90%.

These are the 3 main principles I've been trying to follow with my training ever since I started researching and taking my training more serious. It's the best advice I've ever been given so I'm just taking the time to pass it on. Most people probably already know a lot of this but it's always good to be reminded that it is the simple things that get the best results. Ever since taking this advice seriously I've gone from 116kg barely being about to squat 70kg to what was surely above parallel, bench press 80ish badly and deadlift 90kg (who knows what I could run, I didn't run back then) to 92kg. Yesterday I hit a PB of 122.5 kg squat ass to grass for 3 sets of 5. Deadlift 175kg for 5 reps and bench (properly) pause reps touching sternum 110 kg 3x5. I'm still nowhere near great at running, never have been, but I can now run 5km in under 25 min. It's good for me, but I'm still improving and will be for a long while hopefully. I hit the weights mon/wed/fri for full body workouts and run tue/thurs after training muay thai. I'm not trying to brag, I don't think any of the figures are anything really that impressive, just trying to lend some more credence to the ramblings I just spent half an hour typing into an random internet forum I guess. Take it or leave it?

#37 Edited by mikey87144 (1730 posts) -

Anything you do in excess is bad for you, including exercise. If you're doing cardio for eight hours you're not getting extra benefit. You're hurting yourself. Remember you have a certain amount of fuel in your body and when it runs out your body begins to eat itself for nutrients. You're essentially doing 2 marathons worth of work and based on how the body works the other marathon you're putting your body through is just setting yourself back. Even people who're training for marathons don't actually run the full thing until the event itself. The gains evaporate after 18-20 miles.

#38 Posted by cmblasko (1198 posts) -

@phr4nk0: I, for one, definitely appreciate the time you took to post this and will be applying your advice to my workouts moving forward.

#39 Posted by LTSmash (618 posts) -

The are loads of articles out there about people damaging their bodies by Crossfitting to hard.

#40 Posted by falserelic (5412 posts) -

@phr4nk0: That's some great advice. I'll add some of the methods you said to my workout routine. Today, I managed to exercise for 5 hours, but I did wore myself out doing it. I went to walmart and ate at subway to relax. Outside of feeling very tight I'm all good. I'll take it easy for my weight training tomorrow. I'm just going to focus on my chest, delts, and triceps. Only cardio I'll do is walking to and back from the gym.

#41 Posted by helvetica (90 posts) -

5 hours of cardio is crazy! The best kind of crazy. The longest time I've done cardio was for 12 hours+ for a 50 mile race and I was fine (well, I was little tuckered out.) You do have to be careful when you're hitting the 3-4 hour mark in intense heat for dehydration and hyponatremia. You can tell if you're dehydrated by pinching the back of your hand. If your skin stays tented, you're dehydrated. Hyponatremia (also called "water intoxication") is when you're low on sodium and there's too much water in your system. Both of these can be dangerous.

Do you have a tennis ball or a lacrosse ball? If you roll your calves and quads on the ball, it will hurt but it will help work out the soreness. It's like a personal sport massage! A rolling pin works, too.

#42 Edited by ToTheNines (713 posts) -

Depends on a lot of things. Intensity vs Volume and recovery. Google those things if you want to learn how to train smart. Don't just jump into crossfit or something like that.

Cliche saying, you don't grow in the gym but outside of it.

#43 Edited by big_jon (5723 posts) -

I personally go to the gym for about an hour and a half 5 days a week, pretty much all the time. Anything beyond that tends to be too much for my muscles to recover.

I tend to lift primarily to get stronger and gain mass, I will run for 20 minutes to half an hour after a workout for about 3 months out of the year when I'm cutting weight for summer, I'm doing this right now.

To answer your question that is entirely dependent on your goals. For someone trying to get strong spending too much time at the gym each day can be detrimental. If you're trying to put on mass burning too many calories I general is not a good idea, which is why if someone's bulking cardio is pretty redundant.

Beyond that I don't really know, I'd just say don't burn yourself out, and give your body time to repair.

#44 Edited by falserelic (5412 posts) -

5 hours of cardio is crazy! The best kind of crazy. The longest time I've done cardio was for 12 hours+ for a 50 mile race and I was fine (well, I was little tuckered out.) You do have to be careful when you're hitting the 3-4 hour mark in intense heat for dehydration and hyponatremia. You can tell if you're dehydrated by pinching the back of your hand. If your skin stays tented, you're dehydrated. Hyponatremia (also called "water intoxication") is when you're low on sodium and there's too much water in your system. Both of these can be dangerous.

Do you have a tennis ball or a lacrosse ball? If you roll your calves and quads on the ball, it will hurt but it will help work out the soreness. It's like a personal sport massage! A rolling pin works, too.

That 12 hours beats my 5 by far...way far. Anyway, I don't have a tennis racket, but I plan on getting one for the gym. At LA:Fitness they have these rooms where you hit the ball at the wall and it bounce back. It looks funny, but fun at the sametime. As of now I'm getting pump for my next workout tomorrow and watching fitness vids.

I'm not going to go super crazy with the weight...aleast not yet. I've tried to bench 180 pounds. I manged to get it off the rack, but couldn't bring it up. It wasn't a good idea when I was already sore, but I will tone it down and work my way up gradually. I'll be going hard while listening to some Naruto music.

#45 Posted by HurricaneIvan29 (582 posts) -

@big_jon said:

To answer your question that is entirely dependent on your goals. For someone trying to get strong spending too much time at the gym each day can be detrimental. If you're trying to put on mass burning too many calories I general is not a good idea, which is why if someone's bulking cardio is pretty redundant.

Cardio during bulking is acceptable if you're doing it right. I went through a phase where I alternated powerlifting and HIIT days and kept a close eye on my diet for each day. Basically a full scale bulk diet on powerlifting and cut diet on HIIT and I was actually surprised that it worked so damn well as I was very skeptical. But even if you're just bulking you should do medium intensity cardio every other day early in the day before your weightlifting and take it into account for your diet (you just have to eat more is all). This keeps your body in moderate shape for when you switch gears.

#46 Posted by big_jon (5723 posts) -

@hurricaneivan29: I get so much cardio in with my job anyways it's not something I need when I bulk. I already have to eat a little over 3000 calories a day while cutting. I'm not rich enough to afford the amount of food I'd need to eat while bulking, and doing cardio on top of my gym routine and physical job where i probably walk 10 or so kilometers a day

#47 Posted by EveretteScott (1459 posts) -

@falserelic said:

I used to be one of those fat chubby gamers, but changed that two years ago.

I get what you're saying but that's not as true as the stereotype makes people think. There's a lot of different weighted people in every hobby. Don't be one of those people to push that stigma about people that play video games.

Awesome for you by the way. Glad you're feeling proud of accomplishing your change.

#48 Edited by falserelic (5412 posts) -

@falserelic said:

I used to be one of those fat chubby gamers, but changed that two years ago.

I get what you're saying but that's not as true as the stereotype makes people think. There's a lot of different weighted people in every hobby. Don't be one of those people to push that stigma about people that play video games.

Awesome for you by the way. Glad you're feeling proud of accomplishing your change.

I wasn't trying to be pushy or anything. To me a person will only be willing to change if they get tired of something. It's not my right to force someone into something if their not willing to make change happen. I remeber when I was 330 pounds I had terrible moods. I'll be very angry or just sad most of the time. People would say whatever I done is in the past and I should get over it, but you can't get over something if it still effects your life.

It wasn't until I've finally got tired of my excuses that I decided to do something about it, and something I don't want to do again is give up. Everytime I've giving up at certain events in my life things got even worse for me. I felt like I didn't push myself hard enough and lacked the confidence to do so. Nowadays, I really don't want to go back to that same mindset I once had. I feel like the only way to accomplish something is to go all out, and keep striving to become even better.

#49 Posted by Nightriff (5023 posts) -

Really feel like this is a repeat thread....

#50 Posted by eskimo (476 posts) -

6-8 hours of cardio sounds fucking ridiculous. You're going to burn a lot of muscle that way, and generally waste away the useful parts of your body. As @vinny_says said earlier if you want to lose weight, just eat less and do an hour or two of cardio. Unless you have specific goals in mind you're better off taking a rounded approach to fitness and doing a little bit of everything, rather than just doing an insane amount of cardio.