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#1 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -


#2 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

I'm sure most could choose C. 'cause it's the obvious choice I guess, but I'm sure there are those of you that think that there is one definitive answer. Maybe not.

#3 Edited by haffy (673 posts) -

no cos gravity

#4 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@haffy: A planet as big as our galaxy, within a galaxy.

#5 Posted by MariachiMacabre (7056 posts) -

I doubt it. Everything in the universe has a limit to size. Maybe though.

#6 Edited by haffy (673 posts) -

At a certain point gravity over comes mass. Only reason stars can become so big is because of the nuclear reaction. Without that they just collapse in on them self.

Also atoms dictate the size at something is stable. White dwarfs go unstable and supernova at something like 1 and a half times the size of the sun. So yeah, planet no chance.

#7 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@MariachiMacabre: Maybe I'm too ignorant to think this, but maybe the known universe isn't all there is? I always see the edge of it, and hear about how "this is the end of it, this is the line where stars don't exist" or whatever, but whatever is beyond the known universe that's black to us, could hold something like it. I guess my imagination is overlapping the logical part a bit.

#8 Edited by nintendoeats (5975 posts) -

I'm pretty sure that anything that large anywhere in the galaxy would create a gravity well that we could see from earth, unless it was so far away that the light hadn't reached us yet. Since we haven't seen any in the observable universe, I highly doubt that there are any elsewhere.

#9 Posted by allworkandlowpay (874 posts) -

No. When you get past Jovian-sized planets, the immense gravity begins to produce the conditions necessary for nuclear fusion. anything 80-90 times the size of Jupiter will be a star.

#10 Posted by MikkaQ (10269 posts) -

A planet that large would collapse under it's own weight, probably.

#11 Posted by SexualBubblegumX (542 posts) -

No not really possible. As people pointed out, it would become unstable.

#12 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@haffy: Yes, to our knowledge, but there's so much we don't know. Heck, we could be all wrong about it all as it is right now; not that I am saying we are, but I'm just pointing out how anything could be. I mean, there could be other universes that do. There could even be a planet as large as our universe! AHHH! No, ha ha. You could be right though, everything to know about our universe, or anything that exist, could possibly be limited to what you say.

#13 Posted by Dany (7887 posts) -

It is not physically possible.

#14 Edited by benspyda (2030 posts) -

Probably as possible as it would be for humans to colonize the sun. So maybe.....?

#15 Edited by whyareyoucrouchingspock (975 posts) -

It would create a galaxy with it's own weight.

#16 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@Dany: @SexualBubblegumX: @MikkaQ: @allworkandlowpay: @nintendoeats: Why is it that just because we believe we know how things work in existence, in this case, our known universe, or beyond, the possibilities are held back to our limited knowledge? I'm just saying, what if there's another universe that is in 5D? Which, sound ridiculous to even bring up, but as with such a topic though, it's not yet possible, or never will be possible to know such a thing. I'm also not saying I disagree with any one of you about this.

#17 Edited by Xeiphyer (5597 posts) -

Not possible based on the current model of the universe as we know it.

#18 Posted by MikkaQ (10269 posts) -

@NTM said:

@Dany: @SexualBubblegumX: @MikkaQ: @allworkandlowpay: @nintendoeats: Why is it that just because we believe we know how things work in existence, in this case, our known universe, or beyond, the possibilities are held back to our limited knowledge? I'm just saying, what if there's another universe that is in 5D? Which, sound ridiculous to even bring up, but as with such a topic though, it's not yet possible, or never will be possible to know such a thing. I'm also not saying I disagree with any one of you about this.

Okay, sure. But when you start to consider the idea of alternate universes, anything is possible, so it's kinda pointless to ponder.

#19 Edited by bybeach (4730 posts) -

Even based within infinite sets, it's hard to conceptualize.. Planet would not be the right term...unless exact conditions allowed for it.. some kind of precise balance of factors. I'll stick with there may be an infinite set of me, with infinite sets of variance of me. That's trippy enough, but allowed if multiple universes, or even infinite this universe, has validity.

#20 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@Xeiphyer: True, but I'm not just asking about what's limited to our knowledge of the known universe.

#21 Posted by DrPockets000 (2859 posts) -

Thats, like, super deep, man.

#22 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@MikkaQ: I don't think so. I don't think it'll ever be pointless to ponder such a thing. I mean, of course it's not a thing I think about often when I think about space, but still.

#23 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@bybeach: Make up a new term and get a million dollars.

#24 Posted by JordanK85 (140 posts) -

So the real title of this thread should be "Do you think anything is possible because we don't know everything?"

#25 Posted by Dany (7887 posts) -

@NTM said:

@Dany: @SexualBubblegumX: @MikkaQ: @allworkandlowpay: @nintendoeats: Why is it that just because we believe we know how things work in existence, in this case, our known universe, or beyond, the possibilities are held back to our limited knowledge? I'm just saying, what if there's another universe that is in 5D? Which, sound ridiculous to even bring up, but as with such a topic though, it's not yet possible, or never will be possible to know such a thing. I'm also not saying I disagree with any one of you about this.

Because science. That is reason enough.

#26 Posted by Zippedbinders (983 posts) -

@Xeiphyer said:

Not possible based on the current model of the universe as we know it.

The most accurate post in this thread.

#27 Posted by nintendoeats (5975 posts) -

@NTM said:

@Dany: @SexualBubblegumX: @MikkaQ: @allworkandlowpay: @nintendoeats: Why is it that just because we believe we know how things work in existence, in this case, our known universe, or beyond, the possibilities are held back to our limited knowledge? I'm just saying, what if there's another universe that is in 5D? Which, sound ridiculous to even bring up, but as with such a topic though, it's not yet possible, or never will be possible to know such a thing. I'm also not saying I disagree with any one of you about this.

You are talking to a philosophy major who two philosophy of science courses last year, and has a lasting interest in the subject. The only reason that I'm not poking holes in your logic right now is that it's two in the morning and I'm writing this from a bed in which I intend to sleep. Now. Good night.

#28 Posted by thedj93 (1237 posts) -
@DrPockets000 said:

Thats, like, super deep, man.

word
#29 Posted by Athadam (673 posts) -

Basically your argument is - since we don't fully know the universe, that anything is a possibility.

My rebuttal? Can you prove that there isn't a massless, invisible spaghetti monster flying over your head right now? Just because you can't prove it - doesn't mean it exists.

To find the truth, you must not only be courageous enough to think of new possibilities but also be rational enough to not get too excited in fantasies. Why can't a planet the size of our galaxy exist? Because such a massive object can not sustain itself over its own gravity.

Also, you should check this link out: http://htwins.net/scale2/

It turns out, the estimated size of the universe is bigger than the observable universe.

#30 Edited by Jace (1092 posts) -

No.

To extrapolate:

The probability of the existence of a galaxy-sized planet is roughly equivalent to that of a theistic deity. They both are backed by the same amount of evidence(0.) Although, at least, one could argue that regular planets existing leans the probability slightly in their favor as opposed to the deities.

#31 Posted by buzz_clik (6928 posts) -
Moderator
#32 Posted by SlightConfuse (3963 posts) -

how would that even work, its gravtational pull would pull everything towards it, or it would collapse under its imsne pressure

#33 Posted by Jay_Ray (1070 posts) -

Physics as we know it would say something of that size would cause all the galaxies in the universe to either collapse into it or achieve orbit around it. If that was the case the universe would not be expanding.

#34 Posted by Hizang (8533 posts) -

Galaxies have no end, so a planet that has no end seems banana's.

#35 Posted by Korwin (2831 posts) -

No something that large would collapse under it's own mass, would make one hell of a large black hole though.

#36 Posted by TobbRobb (4581 posts) -

Couldn't there be a planet shaped gas cloud of that size? Or is that not physically possible either?

#37 Posted by Athadam (673 posts) -

@TobbRobb said:

Couldn't there be a planet shaped gas cloud of that size? Or is that not physically possible either?

It would have to have a very low density to be so disperse - and even then certain segments of that cloud might aggregate together to form stars.

#38 Posted by NlGHTCRAWLER (1215 posts) -

The forest moon of Endur is that big.

#39 Posted by JasonR86 (9611 posts) -

Sure.

#40 Posted by SSully (4129 posts) -

@NTM said:

@Xeiphyer: True, but I'm not just asking about what's limited to our knowledge of the known universe.

Well then you are asking a question that no one here can answer in our lifetime. As others have stated, our current knowledge denies such an idea because things are only able to get so big in our universe. Is there a possibility that there is some realm outside out current universe that allows the creation of a planet that big, yes anything is possible, but you can then start to say can there be a planet made of pure jelly beans. Also for fun, if our universe is simply an atom of some piece of matter in another universe, and in that universe there are planets, then technically speaking the planets it that universe are bigger then galaxies in our universe.

#41 Posted by ComradeKhan (687 posts) -
@Xeiphyer said:

Not possible based on the current model of the universe as we know it.

Which means that it is entirely possible.
#42 Posted by Flawed_System (388 posts) -

@Jace said:

No.

To extrapolate:

The probability of the existence of a galaxy-sized planet is roughly equivalent to that of a theistic deity. They both are backed by the same amount of evidence(0.) Although, at least, one could argue that regular planets existing leans the probability slightly in their favor as opposed to the deities.

I'm just going to say...no.

i don't think it's possible.

#43 Posted by NTM (7280 posts) -

@SSully: But I wasn't asking if anyone could actually answer it, I was asking if anyone thinks there could be. I didn't say, show me proof that it is possible or not. It's all hypothetical. Also, I don't think just because you're the smartest scientist in the world, or even educated in it, you can say it is or not. I think this is being somewhat blown out of proportion. I asked a simple question, and maybe I sounded ignorant to others because I questioned their reasoning, but I wasn't saying anyone was wrong. I don't have a problem with people saying no, I just hope people keep thinking about stuff like it and aren't closed minded because of our limited knowledge. It's like if I went back in time and asked someone if the world was possibly round, then they gave me all these reasons as to why it probably isn't. Maybe they shouldn't think about it on a day to day basis, and maybe not the exact thing I asked about, but just space in general.

#44 Posted by Example1013 (4834 posts) -

@ComradeKhan said:

@Xeiphyer said:

Not possible based on the current model of the universe as we know it.

Which means that it is entirely possible.

Yeah, and we could all just be figments of Nic Cage's imagination. Which is more plausible? That's a trick question, for anyone thinking of responding.

#45 Edited by haffy (673 posts) -

@NTM said:

@SSully: But I wasn't asking if anyone could actually answer it, I was asking if anyone thinks there could be. I didn't say, show me proof that it is possible or not. It's all hypothetical. Also, I don't think just because you're the smartest scientist in the world, or even educated in it, you can say it is or not. I think this is being somewhat blown out of proportion. I asked a simple question, and maybe I sounded ignorant to others because I questioned their reasoning, but I wasn't saying anyone was wrong. I don't have a problem with people saying no, I just hope people keep thinking about stuff like it and aren't closed minded because of our limited knowledge. It's like if I went back in time and asked someone if the world was possibly round, then they gave me all these reasons as to why it probably isn't. Maybe they shouldn't think about it on a day to day basis, and maybe not the exact thing I asked about, but just space in general.

Making an argument about saying something exists, because you can't prove it doesn't exist, is kind of pointless.

You are right that no body can prove you wrong. But this is the same kind of argument religious people will bring up. Arguing about the possible existence of something, based on information we don't know about.

It's a pretty pointless exercise, which I'm sure many people will argue on either side of. I'm not saying it's necessarily a bad thing. But due to the nature of the argument, the subject won't really ever progress because each person brings different rules to the argument. The only real thing you gain from something like this is finding out the perspective of a person, because you sure as hell won't learn anything about the subject being discussed if there is no logical rule set being followed.

Also go read some stuff about philosophy. Because it seems like you would be interested in that area.

#46 Posted by thedj93 (1237 posts) -
@Example1013 said:

@ComradeKhan said:

@Xeiphyer said:

Not possible based on the current model of the universe as we know it.

Which means that it is entirely possible.

Yeah, and we could all just be figments of Nic Cage's imagination. Which is more plausible? That's a trick question, for anyone thinking of responding.

well that would explain the voices.  
and the iguanas
#47 Posted by ComradeKhan (687 posts) -
@Example1013 said:

@ComradeKhan said:

@Xeiphyer said:

Not possible based on the current model of the universe as we know it.

Which means that it is entirely possible.

Yeah, and we could all just be figments of Nic Cage's imagination. Which is more plausible? That's a trick question, for anyone thinking of responding.

If you think that we are anything other than a figment of Nic Cage's endless imagination then you, sir, are mistaken.
#48 Posted by Jay444111 (2441 posts) -

I want it to be possible... mainly because something like THIS would then be possible!

Just let me keep my dream of... I dunno... a galaxy sized robot!

#49 Posted by BisonHero (6232 posts) -

@ComradeKhan said:

@Xeiphyer said:

Not possible based on the current model of the universe as we know it.

Which means that it is entirely possible.

If you want to be an idiot about it, technically anything is "entirely possible", because science rarely deals in absolutes. Any scientific law, theory, rule, or hypothesis is ultimately saying "Given what we know about the universe, we predict this will happen". It's not a guarantee, because our perception of the world is rarely perfect, plus we might all be in The Matrix and suddenly all of the laws of physics could get changed by The Architect.

But assuming that the rules of the universe are in any way consistent (which they have been thus far), his question is straightforward and obvious, because we know how gravity behaves in these kinds of simple situations (hell, we even know how gravity behaves in weird scenarios like in a black hole), and his stupidly large planet would've already collapsed in on itself and become something else.

So by all means, if you want to disregard all of science's predictions because "hey man, could Jesus microwave a burrito so hot that even he couldn't eat it?", go right ahead, but it's not going to get you anywhere.

Online
#50 Posted by Village_Guy (2507 posts) -

Doubtful, it would seem, with our knowledge of the universe, unlikely. But since we don't know that much about the universe (considering that we have estimated that 83% of the universe consist of Dark Matter, which we have no idea what actually is), it could certainly be possible.