#1 Edited by UnholyB (5 posts) -

Hi guys. Let's eliminate faculties of medicine (also contains dentistry), engineering and marine.

Which faculty in college if i study, i would find a job easily with a good(above average and growing) salary?

What do you think?

Edit: Lot of says that do the job you want to do. Well, for now it's impossible.

It's my family. They only help(pecuniary) me for my academic career.

So i can develop myself on my dream job. And when i graduated and started to make money and keep developing myself.

After a couple of years i would have money and develod myself on my dream job. So if i f***k everything up, i'll have chance to try again :)

Because there are alot to learn and develop myself about that thing. A couple of years are't enough. And i can't develop my self and basically eat-and-survive with a temporary job :)

Btw, what i meant about dreamjob is a little private, but not something like being a "rockstar" or a stupid "pop icon" .

#2 Edited by falserelic (5437 posts) -

I'm reminded me of an old horror movie.

World's being invaded by Aliens, but one of them is the mastermind alien.

#3 Posted by Darson (451 posts) -

Something you enjoy? You can't just narrow it down for the monetary gain.

#4 Posted by RollingZeppelin (1975 posts) -

Law and Accounting are two that come to mind.

#5 Edited by Nictel (2412 posts) -

@unholyb said:

Hi guys. Let's eliminate faculties of medicine (also contains dentistry), engineering and marine.

Which faculty in college if i study, i would find a job easily with a good(above average and growing) salary?

What do you think?

You realize (apart from making faculty decision based on job and salary) that engineering is probably your best bet?

#6 Edited by Gamer_152 (14078 posts) -

I mean you're going to hear it everywhere, but don't study something just because you think you'll get a big salary out of it in the end. If you can find a field that you enjoy that also pays well, that's great, but you don't want to be stuck in a job you don't enjoy unless there's really no other option.

Moderator
#7 Edited by audioBusting (1550 posts) -

Something you're good at. If you don't want a job to enjoy, you might as well be useful. Being good at your job increases your chances of keeping it dramatically.

Engineering sounds like your best option for an "easy job" with growing salary, so I'm curious why you would eliminate it.

#8 Edited by UnholyB (5 posts) -

For now, it is all about money. And i hate any kind of engineering. No i don't hate, i'm sick of it, disgusted of it...

Btw i'm not talking about finding an easy job, i'm talking about finding a job easily. There are a lot of people who are flipping burgers after college...

#9 Posted by Aterons (198 posts) -

To be honest engineering ( assuming that engineering includes all the faculties it includes over here, aka anything that has to do with the technical side of machines, computers, electronics... etc ) is basically the best faculty on the list of " Not that much learning vs how much money you get ", not saying that it's easy but you needn't be a genius to finish it and get a well payed job in most countries.

Medicine is pretty much the same but with the intelligence requirement even lower, however the time you need to spend learning and the time it actually takes to finish it + get a full-pay job is double to triple depending on where you are and what you want to do.

If you really hate those tow and want a well payed job than the 2 options that come to mind are:

a) Chemistry, which is pretty much engineering but with chemistry and less math ( and once gain, there are many fields of chemistry and thus many faculties that you can chose from not all focusing on the same subjects and with the same classes )

b) Economics or law, and unless we want to stay PC the definition of those ( especially with the relatively poor economy compared to 5-8 years ago ) is basically "Be rich or go home" and they are there more so than anything to give a diploma to people which already have ways to be hired for those well payed job... you could work you ass off and get a lucky break thus earning yourself a job

Those are the ones that come to mind right now, I'm sure there are more that I'm no thinking of.

#10 Posted by Sinusoidal (1519 posts) -

Don't study something because you want a job in it. If you just want to make good money, don't go to university at all. Get in on the bottom floor in some company at a young age and start climbing the ladder. Chances are by the time you would have graduated university, you'll already have a better job than most college graduates could hope for, and you won't be financially crippled by student loans. This is provided you're not a useless dolt to begin with.

If you must study, do whatever you want for your first degree, then get an MBA and do the exact same thing I suggested above five years late and in debt, with a chance of a better starting position.

#11 Posted by Aterons (198 posts) -

Don't study something because you want a job in it. If you just want to make good money, don't go to university at all. Get in on the bottom floor in some company at a young age and start climbing the ladder. Chances are by the time you would have graduated university, you'll already have a better job than most college graduates could hope for, and you won't be financially crippled by student loans. This is provided you're not a useless dolt to begin with.

If you must study, do whatever you want for your first degree, then get an MBA and do the exact same thing I suggested above five years late and in debt, with a chance of a better starting position.

I'm not sure what "The company" is for you, but most companies require you to do something for them which generally requires you knowing something so unless you have a particular skill that you learnt during high school ( say programming or some extra languages ) you will have to "climb the corporate ladder" from janitor or data entry to nothing, because you don't have anything to climb at that point, unless you get those 1 in 10 jobs which is what the OP doesn't want... he said he wants a secure job not an easy one.

#12 Posted by audioBusting (1550 posts) -

Well, if engineering is out of the question (even though it's a very broad subject with high demand all over), I'm just gonna recommend against studying Law. If you don't care about the law, don't take a university course for it. You're just going to end up with a massive debt and a degree that doesn't get you very far by itself.

#13 Posted by Sinusoidal (1519 posts) -

@aterons said:

@sinusoidal said:

Don't study something because you want a job in it. If you just want to make good money, don't go to university at all. Get in on the bottom floor in some company at a young age and start climbing the ladder. Chances are by the time you would have graduated university, you'll already have a better job than most college graduates could hope for, and you won't be financially crippled by student loans. This is provided you're not a useless dolt to begin with.

If you must study, do whatever you want for your first degree, then get an MBA and do the exact same thing I suggested above five years late and in debt, with a chance of a better starting position.

I'm not sure what "The company" is for you, but most companies require you to do something for them which generally requires you knowing something so unless you have a particular skill that you learnt during high school ( say programming or some extra languages ) you will have to "climb the corporate ladder" from janitor or data entry to nothing, because you don't have anything to climb at that point, unless you get those 1 in 10 jobs which is what the OP doesn't want... he said he wants a secure job not an easy one.

He said he wanted an above-average and growing salary. That's not exactly compatible with secure. Fields with those kinds of salaries are highly competitive. There's always somebody around the corner waiting to replace you. I don't think he said anything about job security anyway.

Many companies value loyalty more than any skill. Most do on the job training for whatever skills they require from you anyway. Get in early and prove your worth working whatever job you can and people will notice.

#14 Posted by chiablo (929 posts) -

If you don't mind me asking, why is engineering out of the question?

#15 Edited by Patman99 (1585 posts) -

This may be controversial but I believe that if you are good at what you can do you can find a job in that field (somewhat easily). Your "above average and growing" salary requirement eliminates a lot of choices. BUT most careers will eventually lead you to a decent salary.

Personally, I studied archaeology/anthropology. Maybe not the top on the list of "easily obtainable jobs" but there is a payoff down the line. Like most other fields, the more experience and training you get, the higher your pay cheque will go. However, competition is high and your ultimate success is dependent on both your skill and your training (with perhaps a little bit of luck). In saying that, most fields are the same way.

Engineering and accounting will always be near the top in terms of job availability, at least for the not too distant future. Getting a job in either of those fields still requires a lot of skill (or experience) and a little bit of luck. Lousy accountants and lousy engineers have just as difficult of a time finding/maintaining a job as a lousy archaeologist.

You are better picking something you have an ability for rather than picking something randomly based on job/salary prospects. Furthermore, you are probably better off for your long term sanity to struggle financially for a few years and then be stable in the future while doing something you enjoy or are good at than being financially stable for your early years and end up hating what you are doing in the long run.

#16 Posted by MonkeyKing1969 (2775 posts) -

1) Study something that has a real job at the end of it. That can be a lot of things, but remember there are not too many jobs for wandering philosophers, poets, or artists. Be very careful about a Liberal Arts degree, if you simply want to study that, okay great but then be VERY CAREFUL about #2.

2) Intern during the summers in your field of study or at a real job of some kind. But, if you cannot intern just get good job. A GOOD JOB is anything that is not a service job. I don't care what they pay you, more than one a service job is garbage on a resume. Get a job in a factory, in an office, a laboratory, or digging ditches because they will teach you more than a service job. If you are a Liberal Arts major then you MUST avoid services jobs at all costs, otherwise you will work at Olive Garden forever.

#17 Edited by tourgen (4503 posts) -

@unholyb: People who know how to do useful things and build things are always in high demand. But you eliminated most of those sooooo... Good luck

#18 Edited by UnholyB (5 posts) -

I edited the first message. Thanks everyone for their valuable mesages :)

@chiablo said:

If you don't mind me asking, why is engineering out of the question?

I hate it. It's not about the engineers, don't get me wrong. I'm just sick of every part of it. I'll never be able to take it a career chance for me.

#19 Posted by TrafalgarLaw (1130 posts) -

why is medicine out of the question? It's not too hard once you get in the groove and you get payed a lot!