#1 Posted by Jasontong (51 posts) -

1. $100, 100$, 100 $. Which one is right?

2. Re:Re:Re:Re:, Re: Re: Re: Re: Which one is right?

So the questions are how to use the space correctly in English?

#2 Posted by Ravenlight (8057 posts) -

In American English, we put the currency sign before the amount and no space in between. Your mileage may vary if you visit other countries.

The second one seems odd. If I understand it correctly, it's the title of an email that's been replied to a few times. I've got no idea with this one as I just let gmail or outlook handle it. My guess is to insert spaces in between, though.

Are you learning advanced English or something? If so, what's your native language, duder?

#3 Posted by Tsoglani (595 posts) -

I think it's pretty universal that the $ comes first. Maybe other currencies like yen the symbol comes after.

As for the second one, pretty sure it's Re:

#4 Posted by Video_Game_King (36566 posts) -

The second one is actually れ:れ:れ:れ。

#5 Edited by SexyToad (2939 posts) -

$100 and Re:Re:Re: I'm pretty sure.

#6 Posted by W0lfbl1tzers (1789 posts) -
Don't worry about it. Just look into Rashida's eyes.
#7 Posted by believer258 (12836 posts) -

In America, it's $100.

I'm not actually sure about the re:re:re: part.

#8 Edited by stinky (1563 posts) -

$100. but cents is opposite, as in 15¢

and Re: Re: Re: use a space.

(though that should never happen but in an email reply.)

as an example, Kingdoms of Amalur: The Reckoning.

only time ":" would use no space would be in notation like time 9:00, or John 3:14 (biblical reference.)

#9 Posted by Raven10 (2056 posts) -

I don't know if there is an accepted standard for the Re: Re: part. I would guess that you should put a space between them, but in general your email provider will take care of that for you and you shouldn't have to worry.

#10 Posted by geirr (2866 posts) -

@W0lfbl1tzers said:

Don't worry about it. Just look into Rashida's eyes.

Who?

#11 Edited by Jasontong (51 posts) -

@Ravenlight said:

In American English, we put the currency sign before the amount and no space in between. Your mileage may vary if you visit other countries.

The second one seems odd. If I understand it correctly, it's the title of an email that's been replied to a few times. I've got no idea with this one as I just let gmail or outlook handle it. My guess is to insert spaces in between, though.

Are you learning advanced English or something? If so, what's your native language, duder?

Thanks dude, my native language is Chinese. I'm not learning advanced English, I‘m just doing the business with foreign clients. So I'd like to improve my English. LOL.

#12 Posted by ThatFrood (3460 posts) -

the dollar sign goes between the 1 and 0 as in 1$00

also when there are repeated colons you alternate spacing and not spacing as in RE: RE:RE: RE:RE:

#13 Posted by Jasontong (51 posts) -

@Tsoglani said:

I think it's pretty universal that the $ comes first. Maybe other currencies like yen the symbol comes after.

As for the second one, pretty sure it's Re:

@SexyToad said:

$100 and Re:Re:Re: I'm pretty sure.

@SexyToad said:

$100 and Re:Re:Re: I'm pretty sure.

But why there's no space behind the symbol? I‘m really confused with the use of SPACE in English.

#14 Edited by Jasontong (51 posts) -

@stinky said:

$100. but cents is opposite, as in 15¢

and Re: Re: Re: use a space.

(though that should never happen but in an email reply.)

as an example, Kingdoms of Amalur: The Reckoning.

only time ":" would use no space would be in notation like time 9:00, or John 3:14 (biblical reference.)

Thanks for your detailed explanation, you make me clear a half.

That's actually complicated to use space. Many English learners in China always put more than a space between 2 words.

#15 Posted by iam3green (14368 posts) -

@Jasontong said:

Thanks for your detailed explanation, you make me clear a half.

That's actually complicated to use space. Many English learners in China always put more than a space between 2 words.

the more than two spaces after a period has to do with typing. i don't remember the rule but i don't use it.

it's $100.

i don't think there is a space in re:re:re:re, email service does that when you forward the emails.

#16 Edited by NathHaw (2848 posts) -

Colons traditionally have two spaces following them (...but how traditional is an email?), but so do periods. It depends on whom you ask; I know some of the mods around here hate two spaces after a period for example.

Edit: Some traditions aren't always observed anymore though. The two spaces after certain punctuation marks are sometimes considered unnecessary because of old fashioned typewriters' formats no longer causing as many potential spacing problems.

#17 Posted by dudeglove (9303 posts) -

sometimes you might get USD after the number e.g. 100 USD, to stress that they're US dollars (as opposed to Canadian dollars). 99.9999999999% of the time the dollar sign comes before the number i.e. $100, because everyone associates the dollar sign with the US. No one cares about Canada. They have a duck on some of their currency.

#18 Posted by Bocam (3994 posts) -

@Jasontong: Are you a gold farmer?

#19 Posted by Mnemoidian (1008 posts) -

I don't think you need to worry about the grammar of "Re:", it's typically inserted by the mail client.

besides, it's typically good enough to have a single "re:" on an email that has received many replies. You know it's a reply and not a new topic. Multiple "re:" just makes it harder to read the title of the mail.

#20 Posted by Omega (875 posts) -

@dudeglove: It's a loon. Hence loonie rather than duckie.

#21 Posted by AlexanderSheen (5148 posts) -

@Bocam said:

@Jasontong: Are you a gold farmer?

No... *whistle*
#22 Posted by Jasontong (51 posts) -

@nrh79 said:

Colons traditionally have two spaces following them (...but how traditional is an email?), but so do periods. It depends on whom you ask; I know some of the mods around here hate two spaces after a period for example.

Edit: Some traditions aren't always observed anymore though. The two spaces after certain punctuation marks are sometimes considered unnecessary because of old fashioned typewriters' formats no longer causing as many potential spacing problems.

Hmm...I have never heard that colons should have 2 spaces followed. Colons and Space, my head hurts. XD

#23 Posted by BrickRoad (720 posts) -

£100

Re: Re; Re.

You always put a space after punctuation, I thought. Like just then, and there. But not when you use brackets (like this).

#24 Posted by Eviternal (199 posts) -

Just use one space after colons and semicolons and you'll be fine.

$100 is correct, as others have said. Also, don't use ¢ unless you're talking about less than $1 (these days I'd say it's equally (or more) common to write $0.50 instead of 50¢ too).

When replying to a series of emails, I just write Re: and then the subject.

#25 Posted by Tsoglani (595 posts) -

@Eviternal said:

Just use one space after colons and semicolons and you'll be fine.

$100 is correct, as others have said. Also, don't use ¢ unless you're talking about less than $1 (these days I'd say it's equally (or more) common to write $0.50 instead of 50¢ too).

When replying to a series of emails, I just write Re: and then the subject.

This sums it up pretty well.

#26 Posted by Scrawnto (2498 posts) -

@Tsoglani said:

@Eviternal said:

Just use one space after colons and semicolons and you'll be fine.

$100 is correct, as others have said. Also, don't use ¢ unless you're talking about less than $1 (these days I'd say it's equally (or more) common to write $0.50 instead of 50¢ too).

When replying to a series of emails, I just write Re: and then the subject.

This sums it up pretty well.

Indeed it does.

But man, I can't remember the last time I saw a cent sign outside of this thread.

#27 Posted by Ravenlight (8057 posts) -

@Jasontong said:

Hmm...I have never heard that colons should have 2 spaces followed. Colons and Space, my head hurts. XD

If you're communicating in a purely digital medium (email, Word docs, chat, etc.) you'll be just fine if you never use a double space.

Something else to watch out for: I interact with a few businesses with offices in South Asia in the course of my job and sometimes I'll see them put a space before a period or question mark (For example: The weather here is nice today .) I'm not sure how common this formatting is in your area, but it should also be avoided. A space should only come after the punctuation.

Good luck in your language/formatting endeavors!