#1 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

Last year I had my first job interview and blew it. My brother had got me a job interview for a security guard position at ford field. My mom and brothers kept giving me advice before going to the interview. Telling me what to do, what to say, look confident, wear something decent, smile and other stuff. After they got through giving me advice it only made me nerves.

So I went to the job interview. Waited for my turn to be up next. Then when the guy was ready to interview me I went shake he's hand and greeted him. So now we was face to face and he started asking me the questions. The more questions he's was asking the more nerves I was getting. I was trying hard to seem professional but it just wasn't something I was use too. I couldn't find the right words to say and I lied about some stuff. I remember some of the stuff I was saying he was marking down on he's paper.

Then I got to the point and said I blew it, sorry for wasting your time. He laughed said it was ok he was nerves when he first had to do a job interview. He was giving me advice before I left if I never got this job. Saying try to get a suit, and practice speaking when your at home. Then he said he'll call me and let me know if I got the job. So I waited for weeks to see if they would call and they didn't. So I assume I didn't get the job so I left my phone on the table. Then went upstairs to go to sleep.

After I woken up I check my phone and they did call. I called them back to see if I got the job, and they never answered the phone. I got kinda pissed that day. But I quickly got over it knowing I didn't really want to be a security guard anyway.

#2 Posted by TaliciaDragonsong (8698 posts) -

I must admit I never really freaked out, usually the waiting room bit is the worst for me, the interview always goes smoothly and I already know what I have to ask and how to behave.
 
Only been declined once for a job interview, but that was because they were looking for people who wanted to sign up for several consecutive years right away, and I kinda have more plans for my future than walk the mail!

#3 Posted by Kidavenger (3508 posts) -

Nervous

Sorry it was driving me nuts reading your post.

I can't say I ever have been nervous at an interview, mostly because I never really cared about any of the jobs I was going for back then when I had to do interviews.

#4 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

@Kidavenger said:

Nervous

Sorry it was driving me nuts reading your post.

I can't say I ever have been nervous at an interview, mostly because I never really cared about any of the jobs I was going for back then when I had to do interviews.

For me my brother tried hard to get me that job, and I didn't want to let him down. At the sametime I really needed money.

#5 Posted by Gargantuan (1881 posts) -

I've only been to one job interview, I was pretty nervous but I got the job. 

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#6 Posted by MightyDuck (1501 posts) -

Interviewing is something that definitely gets easier with more practice and experience. I was a nervous wreck on my first few interviews after college. However, once you get some experience in your field you can begin to. Ring that up when you answer their questions. It'll get easier in time I promise you that!

#7 Posted by MightyDuck (1501 posts) -

Sorry for the grammar issues on my part. Always have trouble posting from my iPad.

#8 Posted by Hunkulese (2642 posts) -

I never understand why people use Giantbomb for their personal diary.

#9 Posted by Chop (1994 posts) -

No.

But to be fair, every job I've interviewed for has been a total shit job. If I actually cared about the job, I'm sure I'd be nervous as hell.

#10 Edited by Danteveli (1160 posts) -

Not much nerves but I was under influence because I have received scholarship the same day and the job want really that important. It was crazy situation because I went on the interview and did everything pretty well up until the moment they asked me for position I was applying. I have forgotten that and the name of the company. Interview was in English and its not my mother tongue. After that everything went bad.

#11 Posted by Everyones_A_Critic (6287 posts) -

The one job I have and have ever had I never had to be interviewed for. But if I was interviewed for a job I'd imagine I'd lie, like A LOT.

#12 Posted by KowalskiTakePoint (65 posts) -

It gets much easier as you do more. As long as you keep at it you will get hired eventually.

#13 Posted by Lunar_Aura (2779 posts) -

ugh, all the jobs I've had to interview for have been total shit except for one which I got and was able to work from home. I'm always nervous during any interview because I'm being sized up and that can't really be good for the social anxiety I already have.

#14 Posted by CookieMonster (2416 posts) -

@Hunkulese said:

I never understand why people use Giantbomb for their personal diary.

This, and I can't take it seriously with such glaring grammatical errors.

#15 Posted by Breadfan (6589 posts) -

People get nervous. It's normal.

#16 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

@Lunar_Aura said:

ugh, all the jobs I've had to interview for have been total shit except for one which I got and was able to work from home. I'm always nervous during any interview because I'm being sized up and that can't really be good for the social anxiety I already have.

I know what you mean about the social anxiety. I'm kinda like that too.

#17 Posted by BraveToaster (12590 posts) -

No, but I have been nervous during a job interview.

#18 Posted by iam3green (14390 posts) -

yes, all the time.

#19 Posted by CaLe (3910 posts) -

You should ask them, "why should I work for you?" and they will think oh shit this guy is Tom Cruise or something.

#20 Posted by Counterclockwork87 (598 posts) -

I don't really get nervous at job interviews, I get more anxious...like I HATE sitting in the waiting room right before I have to meet with the man or woman I'm speaking with. I'm fairly comfortable once I'm face to face, it's the waiting that kills me.

#21 Posted by Lukeweizer (2607 posts) -

Do you mean "nervous"?

#22 Edited by Doctorchimp (4069 posts) -

I'm pretty good at talking so I don't think I've ever been nervous talking to people or in front of a group. Mostly because I know if I'm nervous while I'm trying to convey something it's going to make it so much worse. I've gotten butterflies and been excited beforehand sure, but once it starts I'm generally pretty mellow about it.

#23 Edited by NTM (7264 posts) -

Huh, basically the same exact stuff happened for me up until the part where you'd gave up, like my brother (and friend) getting me the job, and how it was all set up. I was nervous, but it was my first job and some of the answers, while I didn't believe were good, I told them, and after it all, he said right there that I got the job and said I seemed confident, even though I wasn't very. I was less nervous when I was in there though because each step, each question answered, was closer to finishing.

You basically just have to look confident and seem like a friendly person to be around, and you will get the job, which of course doesn't apply to every job, but certainly the one you were going for. All you have to do is answer the questions, even if you don't think they'll like the answers, be honest and act confident. Also, don't give up, and trust me, there are a lot of people out there worse than you, and have it worse than you, so go in and think of all the great things that will happen once you get the job and not about what will go wrong in the process.

One other thing, don't be afraid to ask questions. If it helps, I can relate. I don't have a job, haven't had one for a few years now. There are a few reasons behind that, but the one most reminiscent to your problem is the interviewing process, it's really hard to work up the confidence and motivation to go out and get a job for some, and that's something that affects me. When it comes to the interview, I just wish there was a way to bypass it, but there's not, so you have to get through it.

#24 Edited by Nexnecis (43 posts) -

Man, I''m normally a pretty nervous person but the day or so after I get a confirmation of an interview I'm nervous as fuck. My appearance, my handshake, my response to questions, etc... all scare the hell out of me.

But once I'm actually IN the interview I've always regarded it as a positive experience and had fun doing it. It's probably due to the fact that I stress about the questions beforehand so much that they come out pretty easily during that actual interview and that talking technically is Way easier than coming up with small talk with a person you don't know on short notice ( yeah, I date poorly :-) ).

IOW, nerves can be a good thing pre-interview. Embrace them. If the interview comes out poorly after that, then maybe that job/place wasn't suited for you. Chalk it up to experience and move on to better things.

Edit: And yes, like NTM said, do NOT be afraid to ask questions. At my job the one thing that scares me the most about new people who get hired is when they don't ask questions. People who ask questions are engaged in the situation, curious, and basically trying to get better at their job. They're confident enough to know to say " Hey, I want to know more". People who just smile and nod just come across as pretty passive workers., and that's something interviewers should honestly notice.

#25 Posted by believer258 (11630 posts) -

Actuallly, the interviews I've had landed me an unexpected internship and a very quick acceptance phone call.

I will not brag or be proud of it, but my interviewing skills are not bad because I'm A-OK with talking to one or a small group of people. Unfortunately, it's when I'm trying to take in an entire day's worth of new faces that I'm not OK with. I never want to go to a big party or something of that sort.

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#26 Posted by Paindamnation (786 posts) -

Waiting rooms don't bug me. I just play on my phone or my tablet. When I go in I always give good eye contact, answer honestly, keep my hands in my lap, and then ask at the end, "How did I do? " "Do you think I would fit in here?" They have no reason to lie to you, if you blew it they will tell you. So far that strategy works great. Just think of them naked too, ya know, if that's your thing.

#27 Posted by matti00 (668 posts) -

I get very nervous, but that's just a part of life. I'm not even uncomfortable talking to strangers, but I just find it quite stressful, even if people say I interview well afterwards.

I have a nervous system problem which makes me physically shake most of the time too, so I have to load up on beta blockers before interviews. It's a tough experience.

#28 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

@NTM said:

One other thing, don't be afraid to ask questions. If it helps, I can relate. I don't have a job, haven't had one for a few years now. There are a few reasons behind that, but the one most reminiscent to your problem is the interviewing process, it's really hard to work up the confidence and motivation to go out and get a job for some, and that's something that affects me. When it comes to the interview, I just wish there was a way to bypass it, but there's not, so you have to get through it.

I understand how you feel. I have trouble finding a job too. Been trying to get my life in order and its been hard.

#29 Posted by bill (97 posts) -

its best to lie and kiss ass in an interview for a job

#30 Posted by super_machine (1930 posts) -

No, I got almost every job I ever wanted.

#31 Posted by DriveupLife (909 posts) -

How old are you people? Everyone sounds like theyre applying to be a baggage clerk at a grocery store. Interviews for entry level jobs are predictable, and you can get good at each part of them before you walk into the interview room. A really well written resume and cover letter, sharp dress and an agreeable, HONEST, excited conversation is often all you need to win in an interview. You get less nervous the more you interview. If you said lieing is a good thing to do, you're an idiot. One false statement discovered at any time after you're hired is terms for dismissal. If you're in college you need to start taking mock interviews earlier than later + internships.

#32 Posted by Turambar (6675 posts) -

I've always been comfortable with public speaking, so never had that issue.

#33 Edited by Hyperglide (149 posts) -

Interviews like a lot of 1st's in life can be difficult. Similar to having sex your first time. You are going to be a dud your first time through and struggle your way through it but with practice it becomes easier. I've only been rejected for 1 interview and I don't even know why. I was very confident and didn't screw up anything in the interview. I guess they thought I was overqualified. You just gotta let it go.

I think the biggest fear is the fear of rejection. If you screw up an answer, or don't smile all the time or don't make eye contact or don't give a firm enough handshake you will be rejected. I've learned that you just have to relax and just be yourself and don't try to be perfect. Breathe. Best advice anyone can give you for an interview.

#34 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

Nice advice.....

#35 Posted by Sploder (917 posts) -

My interviews usually go pretty well, I just have to make sure I have a few things to ask at the end and to have some knowledge about the job I'm applying for.

#36 Posted by ManU_Fan10ne (662 posts) -

@Hunkulese said:

I never understand why people use Giantbomb for their personal diary.

what else would you use?

#37 Posted by evildoer993 (8 posts) -

@falserelic: If you remember to read up on the company, be groomed, dress decently, sit up straight, don't read into questions, talk slowly (this is my biggest problem), and never touch any objects of the interviewer, you'll be alright. If it's a larger company, learn some industry buzzwords, typically the HR person isn't making the hiring decision but saying the right things can get you further in the process. Just make sure you know how to apply those buzzwords if you throw them out.

Also remember, they're not expecting you to know everything. Typically they'll throw out a tough question to see how you respond to adversity. Just make sure you say something sane. I also wouldn't overdress. A suit for a security job guard sounds crazy. Unfortunately, it does impress some people, but depending on the job, it might weird people out. Also work on common statements you might hear. For example, where do you see yourself in five years?

For entry level jobs they're looking to hear about how you'll show initiative, follow instructions, and even simply show up for work on time. You need to be a gear that works with the rest of the system. It's very unlikely you're being placed into a role that can make any kind of business decision. Focus on talking about how you'll work as hard as you can to be part of the team or work within their system. Not how you'll revolutionize the industry. The truth is when you're applying for an entry level position, you're cannon fodder. You can certainly grow to be more valuable over time, this is fairly common with a decent company. It's so incredibly rare to bring someone in from the outside for an important position anymore. There are so many systems and processes in place, it's difficult to catch up to speed.

A good example of being proactive in the interview process: If you're applying for a position at an ISO certified facility, all the processes you would need to follow are documented and made available to employees to ensure consistent procedures. This is extremely important to the facility. I can promise you that if you bring this up before the interviewer does, it'll be a major plus during your interview.

#38 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

@evildoer993 said:

@falserelic: If you remember to read up on the company, be groomed, dress decently, sit up straight, don't read into questions, talk slowly (this is my biggest problem), and never touch any objects of the interviewer, you'll be alright. If it's a larger company, learn some industry buzzwords, typically the HR person isn't making the hiring decision but saying the right things can get you further in the process. Just make sure you know how to apply those buzzwords if you throw them out.

Also remember, they're not expecting you to know everything. Typically they'll throw out a tough question to see how you respond to adversity. Just make sure you say something sane. I also wouldn't overdress. A suit for a security job guard sounds crazy. Unfortunately, it does impress some people, but depending on the job, it might weird people out. Also work on common statements you might hear. For example, where do you see yourself in five years?

For entry level jobs they're looking to hear about how you'll show initiative, follow instructions, and even simply show up for work on time. You need to be a gear that works with the rest of the system. It's very unlikely you're being placed into a role that can make any kind of business decision. Focus on talking about how you'll work as hard as you can to be part of the team or work within their system. Not how you'll revolutionize the industry. The truth is when you're applying for an entry level position, you're cannon fodder. You can certainly grow to be more valuable over time, this is fairly common with a decent company. It's so incredibly rare to bring someone in from the outside for an important position anymore. There are so many systems and processes in place, it's difficult to catch up to speed.

A good example of being proactive in the interview process: If you're applying for a position at an ISO certified facility, all the processes you would need to follow are documented and made available to employees to ensure consistent procedures. This is extremely important to the facility. I can promise you that if you bring this up before the interviewer does, it'll be a major plus during your interview.

Thanks for the advice. It will be helpful for the current job I'm trying to apply for.

#39 Posted by Vault101 (10 posts) -

no, I'm a cyborg only cyborgs don;t get nerves

#40 Posted by falserelic (5324 posts) -

I know I spelled nervous wrong people. Sometimes my aswome idiotic ways gets the best of me. Then again I'm just being human stuff like this happens.