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#1 Edited by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

I'm trying to help out a little more in my family, so I decided to attempt to help lower the grocery bill and make a bit of, hopefully, tasty food. I'm wondering, what are other duders' methods?

I know rice and beans are usually cheap, so I would like to learn some recipes that make great use of them or any other food for that matter. Any help would be appreciated!

#2 Posted by jayjonesjunior (1085 posts) -

Eggs.

#3 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

Eggs.

I guess that's an acceptable answer. Anything special I can do with eggs?

#4 Edited by NTM (7235 posts) -

Cup noodles... :D. If you have a job, just help pay for the groceries, that's about as fine as it gets I'd say. I'm not exactly sure what you're asking actually. Are you asking what you can buy and make for the family? What if your family doesn't want rice and beans? You should look it up on Google for whatever you need. I know that's a simple and often dumb answer, but when it comes to a question like this, I think Google can help quite well.

#5 Posted by Video_Game_King (35834 posts) -

Click the button that looks like an apple on a clipboard.

Online
#6 Posted by eternalrift (73 posts) -

I try to avoid all unnecessary carbs when grocery shopping, like chips and bread. Sure it's easy calories, but they're nutritionally void and just make you hungry sooner. Soup is a great way to get more meal out of less, so buy things like cabbage and other vegetables that can go into a stew. Stew meat is also among the cheapest meat out there.

@sexytoad said:
@jayjonesjunior said:

Eggs.

I guess that's an acceptable answer. Anything special I can do with eggs?

Eggs make for a great breakfast. Just fry up two eggs in the morning and you should be good to go until lunch. You can also hard-boil them for a snack or for egg salad.

#7 Posted by Jams (2959 posts) -

I try to avoid all unnecessary carbs when grocery shopping, like chips and bread. Sure it's easy calories, but they're nutritionally void and just make you hungry sooner. Soup is a great way to get more meal out of less, so buy things like cabbage and other vegetables that can go into a stew. Stew meat is also among the cheapest meat out there.

@sexytoad said:
@jayjonesjunior said:

Eggs.

I guess that's an acceptable answer. Anything special I can do with eggs?

Eggs make for a great breakfast. Just fry up two eggs in the morning and you should be good to go until lunch. You can also hard-boil them for a snack or for egg salad.

yeah, crock pot meals are pretty hearty, filling and cheap too. Do something like put a whole chicken in a crock pot with potatoes, carrots and celery. Add like a cup of water. Let it cook all day and then eat the chicken up with rice. Take out all the bones and shred the extra chicken and you got yourself a nice chicken soup. You can do something similar with beans and ham. Crock pot meals tend to be the best when it comes to ease of cooking, price and heartiness.

#8 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -
@ntm said:

Cup noodles... :D. If you have a job, just help pay for the groceries, that's about as fine as it gets I'd say. I'm not exactly sure what you're asking actually. Are you asking what you can buy and make for the family? What if your family doesn't want rice and beans? You should look it up on Google for whatever you need. I know that's a simple and often dumb answer, but when it comes to a question like this, I think Google can help quite well.

Yeah, I'm asking for actually feeding the whole family.
I've been looking around google, I just thought I'll ask here and see people's personal answers.

I try to avoid all unnecessary carbs when grocery shopping, like chips and bread. Sure it's easy calories, but they're nutritionally void and just make you hungry sooner. Soup is a great way to get more meal out of less, so buy things like cabbage and other vegetables that can go into a stew. Stew meat is also among the cheapest meat out there.

Stew and soup actually sounds good. Thanks!

#9 Posted by PandaBear (1295 posts) -

It all depends on where you live really. No point saying "buy more beef and freeze it" if you live in a part of the world where seafood is much less expensive.

#10 Posted by razzdrazz (62 posts) -

I'm with all the other people here. If you're looking for cheap produce, try a farmer's market or local fruit stand. Some can be pricey depending on where you live, but some of the best and cheapest produce I buy is from a local grocery. The big part is thinking in cost-effectiveness. That's where the soups and crock-pots/dutch ovens come in. Pasta is also cheap to make. Just use what you buy and don't go to the grocery store when you're hungry!

#11 Posted by ViciousBearMauling (861 posts) -

It may sound backwards, but opting for the healthy option and avoiding as much unhealthy food as possible. It is more pricey, but so much more fulfilling that you end up saving because you'll eat less overall.

Make big dinners that can last 2 or 3 nights like a big pot of chili or stew.

Eggs are actually VERY flexible and cheap. You can have them for dinner, lunch and breakfast (Even dessert in some cases)

#12 Edited by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

It all depends on where you live really. No point saying "buy more beef and freeze it" if you live in a part of the world where seafood is much less expensive.

I live in Washington, USA. I think we have a good mixture of both.

I'm with all the other people here. If you're looking for cheap produce, try a farmer's market or local fruit stand. Some can be pricey depending on where you live, but some of the best and cheapest produce I buy is from a local grocery. The big part is thinking in cost-effectiveness. That's where the soups and crock-pots/dutch ovens come in. Pasta is also cheap to make. Just use what you buy and don't go to the grocery store when you're hungry!

I will be looking into have soups, and stew, and all those other liquidy foods.
I might look into pastas, see if I can find any neat recipes around.

It may sound backwards, but opting for the healthy option and avoiding as much unhealthy food as possible. It is more pricey, but so much more fulfilling that you end up saving because you'll eat less overall.

Make big dinners that can last 2 or 3 nights like a big pot of chili or stew.

Eggs are actually VERY flexible and cheap. You can have them for dinner, lunch and breakfast (Even dessert in some cases)

I want to make healthy foods for sure. My parents can't be eating too much junky food considering their health. I'm planning to make stews, and I think I'll also be playing around with eggs.

#13 Posted by ch3burashka (4992 posts) -

Don't like food? Don't eat.

#14 Edited by audioBusting (1462 posts) -

Three things I always buy: eggs, dried pasta and veggies. Root vegetables are usually cheap and filling. I always have carrots and onions ready and they're great for cooking anything. Rice is great too, but it depends on what kind of food you cook. Also try to follow a shopping list, deviating only for the occasional things on sale.

#15 Edited by MikeJFlick (435 posts) -

Buy alot of cheap good food in bulk, below is a simple list that doesn't cost alot if you shop around and can make tons of different great dishes.

  1. pasta
  2. rice(I don't suggest white)
  3. bread(freeze it)
  4. tuna by the case
  5. cheese in bulk(freeze it)
  6. tomato sauce
  7. butter
  8. olive oil
  9. salt
  10. chick breast in bulk (freeze it)
#16 Posted by RazielCuts (2911 posts) -

I have a question. Can you eat healthily for cheap? Because all the things I like and live off at the mo - Potatoes, Rice, Bread, Pasta are good to buy in bulk but then I don't think they are very good for you, right? Like they're just pure fill up food carbs with not much nutritional goodness.

#17 Edited by zombiepenguin9 (526 posts) -

I'll go ahead and submit another vote for crock pot meals. If all you do is buy some dry beans and a ham, you've got a meal that's tasty, easy, and nutritious.

Some stew meat with sliced potatoes, carrots and onions with some gravy is one of the best winter meals you'll ever have. Crock pots make it possible.

Also, we tend to eat Mexican one or two times a week. All you need is some taco shells, black beans, corn, salsa, shredded cheese and sour cream... 10-15 bucks, and you won't even use all of the ingredients in one meal (sour cream, cheese, etc). Add some meat if you like. You can buy canned black beans and corn for under a dollar a can.

#18 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

I'll go ahead and submit another vote for crock pot meals. If all you do is buy some dry beans and a ham, you've got a meal that's tasty, easy, and nutritious.

Some stew meat with sliced potatoes, carrots and onions with some gravy is one of the best winter meals you'll ever have. Crock pots make it possible.

Also, we tend to eat Mexican one or two times a week. All you need is some taco shells, black beans, corn, salsa, shredded cheese and sour cream... 10-15 bucks, and you won't even use all of the ingredients in one meal (sour cream, cheese, etc). Add some meat if you like. You can buy canned black beans and corn for under a dollar a can.

Crock Pots are what I'm looking into now after all these suggestions. Thanks!
Plus, I'm mexican, so the second thing shouldn't be a problem.

Don't like food? Don't eat.

I'll be losing tons of weight in no time, and just in time for swim suit season. Thanks!

Buy alot of cheap good food in bulk, below is a simple list that doesn't cost alot if you shop around and can make tons of different great dishes.

  1. pasta
  2. rice(I don't suggest white)
  3. bread(freeze it)
  4. tuna by the case
  5. cheese in bulk(freeze it)
  6. tomato sauce
  7. butter
  8. olive oil
  9. salt
  10. chick breast in bulk (freeze it)

Will be looking for recipes including these, thanks!

#19 Posted by NTM (7235 posts) -
@sexytoad said:
@ntm said:

Cup noodles... :D. If you have a job, just help pay for the groceries, that's about as fine as it gets I'd say. I'm not exactly sure what you're asking actually. Are you asking what you can buy and make for the family? What if your family doesn't want rice and beans? You should look it up on Google for whatever you need. I know that's a simple and often dumb answer, but when it comes to a question like this, I think Google can help quite well.

Yeah, I'm asking for actually feeding the

whole

family.

I've been looking around google, I just thought I'll ask here and see people's personal answers.

@eternalrift said:

I try to avoid all unnecessary carbs when grocery shopping, like chips and bread. Sure it's easy calories, but they're nutritionally void and just make you hungry sooner. Soup is a great way to get more meal out of less, so buy things like cabbage and other vegetables that can go into a stew. Stew meat is also among the cheapest meat out there.

Stew and soup actually sounds good. Thanks!

You're in Yakima right? What stores are around you that are cheap? Try to avoid Top Foods when it comes to money, even Albertson's now. If you can, find a Fred Meyers. That's not going to help you with food, but it should help with prices, unless you already knew all of this.

#20 Posted by SadPatrol (499 posts) -

Rice. Chicken breast.

#21 Posted by falserelic (5278 posts) -

Ramon Noodles and throw in any meat you like or have it plain.

#22 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

@ntm: Yep, close enough to do my shopping there. I'm pretty sure Top Foods is going out of business. Might be worth while to see if I can find any bulk food for cheap there. I don't know too much about prices, but I have a Fred Meyer near by, so I'll be sure to check the prices there compared to other places.


#23 Edited by NTM (7235 posts) -

@sexytoad said:

@ntm:

Yep, close enough to do my shopping there. I'm pretty sure Top Foods is going out of business. Might be worth while to see if I can find any bulk food for cheap there. I don't know too much about prices, but I have a Fred Meyer near by, so I'll be sure to check the prices there compared to other places.

Hm. Kind of off topic, and probably not too interesting, but near my old house in Shoreline (not sure if you heard of the place), I hear that Top Foods went out of business too. Well, I find it somewhat interesting because I wonder why. There's one down the street from me and it's fine. Oh, and you should remember to pick up ads, they help. Fred Meyer is cheaper than Albertsons or Top Foods, while I believe QFC is the same price as Fred Meyer since they're the same company. Safeway's also a good choice; not quite as good as Fred Meyer I don't believe, but better than Top and Albertsons. Anyways, yeah, just remember to pick up ads because they help.

#24 Edited by rockyboyussr (6 posts) -

If you are in Yakima, maybe go check out the Grocery Outlet there. The one here in Bellingham can have some really killer deals. A decent amount of it is sweets and processed stuff, but they also have just super cheap canned food, spices, and some produce. It's big time no frills, but you will save some cash.

Edit: Also, if you have an Asian market you can get some gigantic bags of rice for cheapy cheapy. Both plain white and nicer stuff like jasmine. Probably the same situation at a hispanic market for other staples.

#25 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

If you are in Yakima, maybe go check out the Grocery Outlet there. The one here in Bellingham can have some really killer deals. A decent amount of it is sweets and processed stuff, but they also have just super cheap canned food, spices, and some produce. It's big time no frills, but you will save some cash.

Edit: Also, if you have an Asian market you can get some gigantic bags of rice for cheapy cheapy. Both plain white and nicer stuff like jasmine. Probably the same situation at a hispanic market for other staples.

Off topic, I plan to go to college in Western up there in Bellingham. It seems like a really nice place.

#26 Edited by subliminal_kid (60 posts) -

Unless you don't have time, it is cheaper to buy dry beans and soak them the night before and boil them rather than buying canned beans. Plus you control the amount of sodium when you prepare it yourself. If you add about a tablespoon of white vinegar to the soaking water it helps break down the enzymes which cause the unpleasant side effect of eating a lot of beans.

Chili is a good, inexpensive meal, this is a pretty good recipe: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/chili_con_carne/ . Usually use ground beef and ground pork, no bacon, leftover homemade baked beans and whatever other spices I feel like throwing in. Said baked beans are another good cheap meal, good to make on a weekend when you are home as they require long, slow cooking.

Edit: always rinse and look through dry beans for small pebbles, not fun to bite into.

#27 Edited by rockyboyussr (6 posts) -

It is indeed pretty nice. Much luck gettin up here.

#28 Posted by Rick_Fingers (524 posts) -

Big salads are another way of eating healthy for less, especially with some tinned tuna or whatnot mixed through.

#29 Posted by MonetaryDread (1987 posts) -

@sexytoad:

As a chef by trade the best thing you can do is to prepare everything from scratch, and make your food in large quantities.

#30 Edited by SpoogeMcduck (178 posts) -

Has anyone said chicken thighs yet?? You can get a couple pounds of the boneless/skinless chicken thighs for a lot less than the same amount of chicken breasts. They're fattier but taste better

Edit:

@jayjonesjunior said:

Eggs.

I guess that's an acceptable answer. Anything special I can do with eggs?

I used to eat fried eggs until I finally learned to poach them, never fry eggs anymore since I like poached better

#31 Posted by Imst (61 posts) -

I agree with others... EGG...rick in protein :D

#32 Posted by Zelyre (1105 posts) -

Pasta.

Get a pound of ground beef.

A big ass can of tomatoes and a lil can of tomato paste.

An onion. A bell pepper. A few cloves of garlic. Mushrooms. Olive Oil.

Dice onions and peppers. Cook until the onions are clear. Toss in the ground beef and diced garlic. Once browned, drain if needed. Then work the tomato paste in. Dump in the big ass can of tomatoes. Add half cup of water or so. Add a bit of salt, some oregano, thyme, basil, (Or just... italian seasoning) and a bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then simmer. Add a bit more salt to taste. Toss mushrooms in and cook for a bit longer.

You'll end up with quite a lot of sauce.

Learn how to quarter up a chicken. A whole chicken is usually much cheaper than buying a chicken that's been cut up already.

#33 Posted by afabs515 (1003 posts) -

I've been making a bunch of mac and cheese recently. You can find a lot of easy recipes for that online and adapt those so you get a ton of pasta. The recipe I use by default makes four servings, so I have 3 meals or so with it. Idk what your price range is, but pasta, shredded cheese, milk, and flour aren't the most expensive things in the supermarket by any means.

#34 Posted by Ubercroz (1 posts) -

Split pea soup - Use chicken broth when you make it. It's pretty good and can easily feed a family. Costs like $1 for a bag and then another $1 for the chicken broth (or bouillon cube with water). The recipe on the bag is pretty straight forward. Pea's are a tremendous food with lots of nutrients and protein. If you know what taste you like, then you can add some great seasonings and it can be delicious.

I guess I am not sure what your budget is to help out with. I am in law school and have a wife and 2 kids, my budget is ultra lean. But, I spend money on food. I buy a shoulder of lamb and turn half into stew and the other half into chops with a bourbon glaze. I buy a 15 lb pork shoulder and smoke it for 16 hours and use it for weeks. I make regular trips to the grocery store to buy fresh food. But I have developed the skills to do that stuff, I am a pretty good cook and I know how to slow cook things over smoke.

Really what you need is something we can't give you hear, experience and know-how. I would say go to a website like epicurious and do some recipe searches on there. Try and figure out what tastes good and meets not only your dollar budget, but your time budget as well.

#35 Edited by Raven10 (1706 posts) -

I will add to everyone mentioning stews of various sorts. I'll add, though, that there are a lot of interesting stew like dishes from cultures around the world that can mix things up. Indian curries are incredibly tasty and you can make a large amount with whatever meats and vegetables you want. Indian food is also very healthy compared to a lot of other foods. Then you have various Arabic and Middle Eastern stews. Moroccan stews with dates, prunes, raisins, or other dried fruits can be very tasty if you want a sweet alternative to the standard American stew. Cajun cuisine is also chock full of tasty stews, especially if you are a seafood fan. There are some excellent Thai and Japanese soups and stews that use a lot of rice and fish, both of which are much more healthy than meat or potatoes.

I want to recommend brown rice in general. You can get tons of it for cheap. It contains less sugar than potatoes or wheat based starches, and can be used as the foundation for most any stew or soup. Greek lemon based soups with rice are great and can give you all your food groups in a single dish.

I'd also suggest if you do noodle dishes to do baked ones. Putting some sort of stuffed noodle in a baking pan and covering it with sauce, meat, and cheese is cheap and can feed a family for several days. Plus pasta heats up really well. While many people focus only on Italian pasta dishes, pasta is used in a ton of different cultures. Thai and Korean dishes often make use of pasta in the form of rice noodles.

Another favorite of mine is pie. Most people in the US associate pies with dessert but in Europe pies often take the form of a main dish. In England meat pies are very popular. In the US we sometimes have Shepard Pie or Chicken Pot Pie but there are tons of meat pies that are incredibly tasty. They usually aren't as healthy as a rice based dish or even a pasta but you can make a pretty massive pie filled with cheapish foods and serve a ton of people easily. In France they make Quiche which is a cheese pie. Most often it is made with swiss cheese and onions. You can add meats and vegetables as you wish. Ham or bacon is often used for meats while mushrooms are a very popular addition. Add in some more American veggies like broccoli or spinach if you like. Just make sure to cook and drain the spinach before you put it in the quiche. In fact, pro tip, always cook your spinach first, and always cook frozen leaf veggies of all sorts first. They'll have soaked up liquid and will ruin the texture of your dish. Cook them and drain them and then put them in with everything else.

The last suggestion I wanted to make was buying in bulk. Depending on the size of your family it may be advantageous to buy in bulk and freeze your food. Buying a 10 pound bag of potatoes costs a lot less per potato than buying three or four potatoes every time you want to make a potato dish. The same is true of virtually any food. Of course fresh foods almost always taste better than frozen ones so you are sacrificing quality for cost but if money is more important to you then buying in bulk might be good. Another thing you can buy in "bulk" is beef. If you live near a cow farm (which you most likely do in Washington) you could purchase either all or part of a cow and then store it in a meat freezer. Fresh beef will last 6 months or more if you freeze it right away and keep it frozen. If you can find another family who would want to share a cow you could buy half each. You'll get several hundred pounds of meat at a fraction of the cost you would pay buying the pre-cut stuff in the stores, plus you get to personally choose your cow and you can be absolutely certain where and how it was raised and slaughtered. You do have to know how to butcher your own meat and need to know what cuts to use for what things but the money you save can be worth it. Of course you have to pay a lot of money up front but then you won't have to buy meat again for at least half a year if not more. You can do similar things with pigs if you'd like.

Oh one last thing. If you want to do something fun and romantic and get some great food out of it, making bread or pasta from scratch with a special someone is a great date idea. Practice beforehand of course, but good homemade bread and pasta is vastly superior than anything you can buy outside of a local bakery and will cost you less than generic store white bread. You can make a ton of different kinds of breads and pastas just by mixing up the types of flour used and adding in additional grains. Also, baking cake from scratch is I find a lot harder but if you get good at it you will save a fortune. Stores charge you like $10+ for a cake that you can make for under a dollar. They are charging you for the time they take to make it, but if you have the time you can make it for yourself for next to nothing. Cake is just eggs, flour, sugar, and fat plus whatever flavor you want. Icing is literally just sugar and food coloring. Whipped cream is exactly what it sounds like. Take some cream and whip it and you get whipped cream. A bottle of store bought stuff will cost you $3 or more but you can make a gallon worth of whipped cream for not much more than that. Basically, the more you make from scratch the more money you will save, and baking is a great way to bond with loved ones or spend time with children.

#36 Posted by audioBusting (1462 posts) -

@spoogemcduck said:

Has anyone said chicken thighs yet?? You can get a couple pounds of the boneless/skinless chicken thighs for a lot less than the same amount of chicken breasts. They're fattier but taste better.

I second this! The thigh and drumstick cuts are under-appreciated in many places. I'm not sure about the price though, it may depend on where you live. Drummettes are pretty good too.

Also, I have some more tips on what to do with eggs:

  • Quick "baked" egg: Oil a bowl a little, crack an egg in, season it, add some water (a tablespoon is good), cover the top of the bowl with paper towel and then microwave it for a couple of minutes.
  • Egg drop soup: Beat an egg, and when the soup's almost done (whatever soup you have), drop the egg into it in a slow consistent stream.
  • Boiled eggs: hard-boil eggs a bit softer than usual, and then put them into a stew or curry you're cooking.

They're an easy way to add something more to whatever you're cooking.

Oh, and I forgot to say that you should always have flour too. There are a million things you can do with flour to make your food more filling and delicious. With it, you can make things like fresh pasta and flatbread as well.

#37 Edited by SexyToad (2760 posts) -
@raven10 said:

Oh one last thing. If you want to do something fun and romantic and get some great food out of it, making bread or pasta from scratch with a special someone is a great date idea. Practice beforehand of course, but good homemade bread and pasta is vastly superior than anything you can buy outside of a local bakery and will cost you less than generic store white bread. You can make a ton of different kinds of breads and pastas just by mixing up the types of flour used and adding in additional grains. Also, baking cake from scratch is I find a lot harder but if you get good at it you will save a fortune. Stores charge you like $10+ for a cake that you can make for under a dollar. They are charging you for the time they take to make it, but if you have the time you can make it for yourself for next to nothing. Cake is just eggs, flour, sugar, and fat plus whatever flavor you want. Icing is literally just sugar and food coloring. Whipped cream is exactly what it sounds like. Take some cream and whip it and you get whipped cream. A bottle of store bought stuff will cost you $3 or more but you can make a gallon worth of whipped cream for not much more than that. Basically, the more you make from scratch the more money you will save, and baking is a great way to bond with loved ones or spend time with children.

This is a great idea, I'll be sure to try this with my girlfriend.
But first I need a girlfriend :(

(I probably should have clarified, this isn't my family, as in, I'm the child in this situation.)
But thanks for all the information, it's been very helpful.

#38 Posted by Raven10 (1706 posts) -

@sexytoad: I got that you were the child but if you are able to cook a good meal for your girl then she is going to be super impressed and you won't have spent a fortune at some fancy restaurant. You want to make a solid impression on a girl (and her family) then cooking a meal for her (and them) is a surefire way to go about it especially in this day and age when 90% of people under 30 have virtually no real cooking skills. Try it when you get a girl.

#39 Posted by Hunter5024 (5511 posts) -

Pancakes are really cheap.

#40 Posted by kadash299 (271 posts) -

Last Time I checked, a McDouble from McDonalds is only $1. 2 of them for everyone in the family, and BOOM

$8, everyones happy.

(lol)

#41 Posted by Vinny_Says (5681 posts) -

Eat less food

I only read the title

#42 Posted by _Zombie_ (1462 posts) -

Eat less. Starvation builds character.

#43 Posted by sixnahalf (50 posts) -

eat less just veggies bread mostly meat no fats at all :D white meat prefer :D

#44 Edited by hidden81 (49 posts) -

Since becoming a vegetarian a few years ago I have had to teach myself to cook properly. I have noticed my grocery bill slowly going down the more I learn about food.

#45 Posted by egg (1450 posts) -

Seared broccoli..

Also, for soups/stew, get lots of bread to go with it. That will fill you up!

#46 Posted by Sploder (917 posts) -

Pasta is pretty cheap and there's a whole lot you can do with it (or to it). That's mostly what I've been eating at university.

#47 Posted by Juzie (167 posts) -

When im having a cheap week. I buy 2 6packs of pies for the week. That satisfies myself quite fine. But seeing as you said you want to make it for your family. The cheapest stuff (that's still quality) is getting various noodles/rice and looking up dishes that go with them. Lower the additives to noodles ratio just slightly and you have a really good, cheap dish. I do it occasionally. But it's too much work for me. I deserve to be fat... I guess the only reason im not is because im too cheap on food LOL.

#48 Edited by CptBedlam (4449 posts) -

Potatos with Quark is a pretty tasty and cheap meal. I eat the Quark mixed with Linseed Oil + bit of salt + bit of milk (makes it more creamy); diced onions on top. Alternatively (if the linseed oil Quark sounds gross to you), mix sliced chives into the Quark+bit of salt+bit of pepper+bit of milk.

#49 Edited by Humanity (8715 posts) -

@sexytoad: Tell Peach to start cooking healthier for Mario. You don't need to eat lasagna every day!

#50 Posted by CoinMatze (469 posts) -

I went like a full year with almost only eating potatoes because I had a monthly grocery budget of 30€. Can't speak for other countries but in Germany you a get a pound of potatoes for 0.25€. You can cook em, fry em, bake em, make soup, mashed potatoes, hash browns, potato salad... I spent the rest on fruit and veggies.

A cheap and easy pasta sauce: sauté one diced onion, then add a bunch of diced tomatoes. I like to use cherry tomatoes. You can then go from there. Zucchini, egg plant, bell pepper, whatever else is in season.

Never ever eat fast food. It may look cheap but it won't fill you at all.

I actually wish I was forced to live on a budget again. I was so healthy and fit during that time.