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#101 Posted by Rapid (1403 posts) -

@liquidprince said:

As a Canadian, I would rather have a dollar bill, then have the loonie.

Yeah... Loonies get heavy and weigh down your wallet =/

#102 Edited by MrT (162 posts) -

sore E aboot that, eh I'll get right on dropping the U

#103 Posted by BrickRoad (704 posts) -

It's Zed. Pretty sure the credits in Men In Black will back me up on that one, and if we can't trust the makers of Men In Black who the fuck can we trust?

#104 Edited by doosmacleod (189 posts) -

@mctangle said:

Aluminium.

Your Honour, I rest my case.

I love being British.

"My Lord", and it was "Aluminum" first. But if we're speaking in absolute firsts, it was alumium.

But hey.

No one's judging here.

#105 Posted by Bribo (605 posts) -

Why drop the U? Why not drop the O instead?

Flavur, honur, harbur etc. That's way better.

#106 Edited by Chibithor (573 posts) -

@mariachimacabre said:

@chibithor said:

When it comes to spelling and pronunciation English is dumb everywhere, Finnish is where it's at. None* of this 'stuff being pronounced differently depending on the word' crap. The Us should be the least of your concerns about consistency

I agree the argument is stupid but to be fair, there are only like 6 of you in Finland (As a man with Finnish heritage, I'm related to 2 of them.) and hundreds of millions of English speakers. Again, not a slight against you Finns. I love all of the Northmen.

Still. No more wondering how to pronounce a word, ever. Doesn't that sound great?! The US is missing an official language anyway, right? Because I've got a good candidate right here. If Obama got behind that, I don't think anyone would complain.

#107 Posted by rebgav (1429 posts) -

@minipato said:

How does GH make an F in "rough" and is silent in "through?" JUST BECAUSE.

Common usage changes things. When -ough was a fresh-faced young sequence it got pronounced every time, but it's hard to maintain the hype for five hundred years. Also, it sounds fucking stupid. Unfortunately, bringing the spelling back in line with pronunciation gives us gems like "thru" and "tho" and that shit srsly f'ing sux, ffs lol omg u guys.

#108 Edited by Irvandus (2883 posts) -

Orthography has always been dumb.

#109 Edited by ei8htbit (86 posts) -

There's bigger things to worry about, like the fact that Alexa Ray Corriea of Polygon, an English Major and official reporter of news for that site, insists on pronouncing the word cache (in the context of website archives) as "cash-ay" in Friday's Speed Run segment. I thought it was just a stream of conscious mistake, however she took it one step further and used the term in the past tense as "cash-ay-ed" a word that actually does not even exist, like at all....ever. Now thousands of impressionable young duders who no longer make the effort to read articles but instead make the minimal effort to keep their eyes open while words are read to their ears in video format will assume that is the correct pronunciation and before you know it the word kashayed will appear in American dictionaries as the proper spelling (the original and proper spelling would probably just be cached (read: cash-ed) somewhere) and some annoying Canadian (like yours truly) will be all up in the threads making frivolous Internet grammar complaints while eating Lay's Ketchup chips, drinking Mott's Clamato Juice Caesars, and mourning the demise of the eternally useful and eco-friendly milk bag. We did give the world Far Cry 3 Blood Dragon so not all will have been in vain....

#110 Posted by Orbitz (67 posts) -

@damodar said:

@ethanml said:

I'm British and fuck this thread.

I'm Australian and I share your sentiment.

I'm Canadian and I agree with the both of you.

#111 Posted by Shimmy (184 posts) -

@ei8htbit said:

There's bigger things to worry about, like the fact that Alexa Ray Corriea of Polygon, an English Major and official reporter of news for that site, insists on pronouncing the word cache (in the context of website archives) as "cash-ay" in Friday's Speed Run segment. I thought it was just a stream of conscious mistake, however she took it one step further and used the term in the past tense as "cash-ay-ed" a word that actually does not even exist, like at all....ever. Now thousands of impressionable young duders who no longer make the effort to read articles but instead make the minimal effort to keep their eyes open while words are read to their ears in video format will assume that is the correct pronunciation and before you know it the word kashayedwill appear in American dictionaries as the proper spelling (the original and proper spelling would probably just be cached (read: cash-ed) somewhere) and some other annoying Canadian (like yours truly) will be all up in the threads making frivolous Internet grammar complaints while eating Lay's Ketchup chips, drinking Mott's Clamato Juice Caesars, and mourning the demise of the eternally useful and eco-friendly milk bag. We did give the world Far Cry 3 Blood Dragon so not all will have been in vain....

If the way a women on Polygon chooses to pronounce a particular word (or non-word as the case may be) ends up changing the dictionary spelling of said word, I'd say we'd have much more important things to worry about than the supposed decay of the English language.

Like, OH GOD WHO IS THIS WOMAN AND HOW IS SHE DOING THIS.

#112 Edited by mellotronrules (1247 posts) -

embrace your british heritage. i'm american, and i wish we used the extraneous 'u.'

in short, canada is great.

#113 Edited by Hemmelight (164 posts) -

Fuck American spellings. Nite?

It's Night.

#114 Edited by selfconfessedcynic (2591 posts) -

@seppli said:

@chocolaterhinovampire said:

Does anyone else think our (Canadians) insistence on putting u's in words like "favour" and "honour" is stupid. Maybe it is just one of those things we do to delude ourselves in to feeling unique? Us Canadians do a lot of things right. Getting rid of the penny? Right. Not having single dollar paper bills? Right. Not having our money just one color? Totally right. Having bagged milk? You bet that's right. But this whole putting U in things never sat well with me. Kudos to you America for cutting the U.

It's the British spelling. Spelling these words with the letter U is more common, and arguably more correct and less *special* than you seem to think - globally-speaking. Americans are the odd man out. Canadians are just more in line with the rest of the world.

Pretty much. Australians use the U as well - similarly, because we speak and write in English, not American.

#115 Edited by Reisz (1527 posts) -

@bribo said:

Why drop the U? Why not drop the O instead?

Flavur, honur, harbur etc. That's way better.

You're on to something, let's take it one step further, one vowel to rule them all!

oh excuse me I mean;

Yuu'ru un tu sumuthung, lut's tuku ut unu stup furthur, unu vuwul tu rulu thum ull!

Yuuh bubu nuw yuur tulkung.

#116 Posted by Icicle7x3 (1203 posts) -

embrace your british heritage. i'm american, and i wish we used the extraneous 'u.'

in short, canada is great.

Treason!

#117 Posted by selfconfessedcynic (2591 posts) -

@mercutio123 said:

@mctangle said:

Aluminium.

Your Honour, I rest my case.

I love being British.

"My Lord", and it was "Aluminum" first. But if we're speaking in absolute firsts, it was alumium.

But hey.

No one's judging here.

Well, to be fair, if the person who originally named a thing goes through iterations and ends up on a "final" name, I would argue that that is what we should use. The man settled on Aluminium in the end, and that is what matters - the weird countersurgence of "Aluminum" in the States seemed to be due to just societal preference.

I believe we're both referring to this article?

The metal was named by the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy (who, you may recall, “abominated gravy, and lived in the odium of having discovered sodium”), even though he was unable to isolate it: that took another two decades’ work by others. He derived the name from the mineral called alumina, which itself had only been named in English by the chemist Joseph Black in 1790. Black took it from the French, who had based it on alum, a white mineral that had been used since ancient times for dyeing and tanning, among other things. Chemically, this is potassium aluminium sulphate (a name which gives me two further opportunities to parade my British spellings of chemical names).

Sir Humphry made a bit of a mess of naming this new element, at first spelling italumium (this was in 1807) then changing it to aluminum, and finally settling onaluminium in 1812. His classically educated scientific colleagues preferred aluminiumright from the start, because it had more of a classical ring, and chimed harmoniously with many other elements whose names ended in –ium, like potassium, sodium, andmagnesium, all of which had been named by Davy.

#118 Edited by MariachiMacabre (7099 posts) -

Fuck American spellings. Nite?

It's Night.

Um...Americans spell it "Night". Where the hell did you hear otherwise? The only time I've seen it spelled Nite is on seedy motel signs that only spell it like that to save space and electricity. Like "drive-thru."

#119 Posted by jsnyder82 (763 posts) -

Just so everybody is clear, milk in the US is subsidized by the government. It is not, however, in Canada. So milk is more expensive in Canada. Which is why they try and cut costs in other areas, such as putting milk in cheaper bags, as opposed to cartons or plastic jugs.

All I'm trying to say is, fuck you Canadians for coming across the border and over-running my Costco and taking all my milk. Stop it. I love Canada, and the people in it, but you've turned my Costco into a shithole!

#120 Posted by PenguinDust (12629 posts) -

Sure, Canada has milk in a bag but what about beer in a bag, eh?

#121 Posted by chocolaterhinovampire (1297 posts) -

@rebgav: Not chunks and it was not sour. Still good just weird....also I was probably 13

#122 Edited by RollingZeppelin (2109 posts) -
#123 Edited by rebgav (1429 posts) -

@rebgav: Not chunks and it was not sour. Still good just weird....also I was probably 13

Oh, you mean that you were probably drunk. Got it.

#124 Edited by RollingZeppelin (2109 posts) -

@bribo said:

Why drop the U? Why not drop the O instead?

Flavur, honur, harbur etc. That's way better.

yeah and country can become cuntry! I like it.

#125 Edited by Turtlebird95 (2612 posts) -

Bagged milk is not a win for Canada at all. I live in Wisconsin so I know a thing or two about milk.

Eh?

#126 Edited by Inkerman (1455 posts) -

IT PUTS THE U'S IN THE WORDS OR ELSE IT GETS THE HOSE AGAIN!

#127 Posted by DonutFever (3537 posts) -

It's just something we stuck with, there's no real reason to get rid of it.

#128 Posted by Cretaceous_Bob (527 posts) -

I'm American and I exclusively use the "u" variants of words. So you're wrong.

#129 Edited by benpicko (2005 posts) -
@ethanml said:

I'm British and fuck this thread.

#130 Edited by deerokus (568 posts) -

@mikkaq said:

@abendlaender said:

As a non-canadian: That's I we learned it in school in europe, so I don't think it's weird at all.

Edit: I hope I don't offend some sort of canadian national treasure by saying this but: Bagged milk looks unpractical as hell.

But it's so damn cheap. That's literally the only reason to buy it. It's for college kids (like me) and poor families who can't afford the practicality of a carton of milk. Milk cartons are almost 5 bucks or over 5 bucks in some case (for a 2L carton). It's like 3 and change for the bags and you get like 4 and a half liters. A jug or bottle is unheard of here for some reason.

@chocolaterhinovampire said:

@mikkaq: I think the new bills look and feel like shit but it does make me think of the fuuture

Why is Canadian milk so expensive? That's like twice as expensive as it is in the UK.

#131 Edited by EXTomar (4948 posts) -

I would like to defer to the English since, you know, English is named after the people the language came from.

#132 Posted by benpicko (2005 posts) -

@deerokus said:

@mikkaq said:

@abendlaender said:

As a non-canadian: That's I we learned it in school in europe, so I don't think it's weird at all.

Edit: I hope I don't offend some sort of canadian national treasure by saying this but: Bagged milk looks unpractical as hell.

But it's so damn cheap. That's literally the only reason to buy it. It's for college kids (like me) and poor families who can't afford the practicality of a carton of milk. Milk cartons are almost 5 bucks or over 5 bucks in some case (for a 2L carton). It's like 3 and change for the bags and you get like 4 and a half liters. A jug or bottle is unheard of here for some reason.

@chocolaterhinovampire said:

@mikkaq: I think the new bills look and feel like shit but it does make me think of the fuuture

Why is Canadian milk so expensive? That's like twice as expensive as it is in the UK.

Everything but electronics is more expensive here in my experience

#133 Edited by GERALTITUDE (3505 posts) -

Please never use "I am Canadian" in a sentence again, thanks.

- Every other Canadian.

#134 Posted by mlarrabee (3062 posts) -

Oh, hey, while we're still on "This Is Canada," how do people in Canada give money to... ladies of impropriety? In America, it's customary to slip the bills beneath various elastic strings.

Do Canadian strippers wear coin dispensing belts?

#135 Posted by Hemmelight (164 posts) -

@hemmelight said:

Fuck American spellings. Nite?

It's Night.

Um...Americans spell it "Night". Where the hell did you hear otherwise? The only time I've seen it spelled Nite is on seedy motel signs that only spell it like that to save space and electricity. Like "drive-thru."

Really?

I've always seen it spelled Nite in reference to the states. I thought it was just stupid, but now I see that not everyone spells it that way.

#136 Posted by Jay_Ray (1129 posts) -

Oh, hey, while we're still on "This Is Canada," how do people in Canada give money to... ladies of impropriety? In America, it's customary to slip the bills beneath various elastic strings.

Do Canadian strippers wear coin dispensing belts?

If you give strippers $1 bills you are a cheap ass person and need to leave the club.

#137 Posted by warxsnake (2650 posts) -
#138 Edited by selfconfessedcynic (2591 posts) -

@benpicko said:

@deerokus said:

@mikkaq said:

@abendlaender said:

As a non-canadian: That's I we learned it in school in europe, so I don't think it's weird at all.

Edit: I hope I don't offend some sort of canadian national treasure by saying this but: Bagged milk looks unpractical as hell.

But it's so damn cheap. That's literally the only reason to buy it. It's for college kids (like me) and poor families who can't afford the practicality of a carton of milk. Milk cartons are almost 5 bucks or over 5 bucks in some case (for a 2L carton). It's like 3 and change for the bags and you get like 4 and a half liters. A jug or bottle is unheard of here for some reason.

@chocolaterhinovampire said:

@mikkaq: I think the new bills look and feel like shit but it does make me think of the fuuture

Why is Canadian milk so expensive? That's like twice as expensive as it is in the UK.

Everything but electronics is more expensive here in my experience

Woah, that's crazy. Milk is $2 / 2L here in Australia and is usually sold in bottles. I don't think we have any cartons >1.2L either. I guess the Canadian dairy industry is smaller or you have some weird back end taxes on making cartons.

#139 Edited by mlarrabee (3062 posts) -

@jay_ray: Are there other kinds of people in strip clubs?

#140 Posted by mellotronrules (1247 posts) -

Sure, Canada has milk in a bag but what about beer in a bag, eh?

hey man- i'd drink a beer in a bag without breaking a sweat. ready for me to blow your mind? that cheap-ass box-wine we sometimes imbibe? IT'S ACTUALLY

BAAAAAG WIIIIIIIIINE! CUE THE

#141 Edited by Hockeymask27 (3683 posts) -

No and ZED is awesome.

#142 Edited by ThePickle (4169 posts) -

@extomar said:

I would like to defer to the English since, you know, English is named after the people the language came from.

You mean the Germanic peoples, right? Because that's where English came from.

#143 Posted by Jams (2966 posts) -
#144 Posted by casper_ (908 posts) -

i kind of like dialects and variations in spelling, pronunciation etc.

i don't think language ought to be a static thing.

#145 Posted by MariachiMacabre (7099 posts) -

@mariachimacabre said:

@hemmelight said:

Fuck American spellings. Nite?

It's Night.

Um...Americans spell it "Night". Where the hell did you hear otherwise? The only time I've seen it spelled Nite is on seedy motel signs that only spell it like that to save space and electricity. Like "drive-thru."

Really?

I've always seen it spelled Nite in reference to the states. I thought it was just stupid, but now I see that not everyone spells it that way.

No one spells it that way in the US. Again, only in shorthand or I guess text messages but everything is spelled wrong in text messages from teenagers.

#146 Edited by Brendan (8140 posts) -

I find the hate for bagged milk here weird, for all the hate people have about losing the penny for fear of paying more for things.

I'll let you in on a secret guys: With bagged milk you get more milk for less money. Doesn't seem like such a dumb decision to me, but what do I know I'm a rational human being.

#147 Edited by rebgav (1429 posts) -

@mlarrabee said:

Oh, hey, while we're still on "This Is Canada," how do people in Canada give money to... ladies of impropriety? In America, it's customary to slip the bills beneath various elastic strings.

Do Canadian strippers wear coin dispensing belts?

I don't know what all of that is about but, in my experience, the performers at my local energy drink bars are not adorned with any sort of elasticated money-holding paraphernalia and attempting to slip anything anywhere is most assuredly discouraged. They tend to frown on that. I would hope that Canadian peelers are equally sacrosanct and... naked, though I'd imagine that a Canadian strip club is cold in every conceivable way.

#148 Edited by 49th (2848 posts) -

why don't you just sell meat in shoes

milk in bags pfft what is that

#149 Posted by mandude (2666 posts) -

Phonetically speaking, I don't see how either variant of colour makes more sense than the other. Would it not have to be something like "culler" to be phonetic?

#150 Posted by RandomHero666 (3183 posts) -

I'm pretty sure the whole 'America dumbing down' is just their way of cutting ties with the brits, or it may have something to do with the french.

I think that's why yanks drive on the right side of the road? not sure.
Anyone the brits colonized drives on left, because in the oldy times horsemen were right handed, so riding on the left gave them a clear shot.
French.. Napoleon was left handed so went right side, anyone they colonized done that.

All of the above may be wrong.
in short.. the U is either America being different because brits, or the surrender monkeys, or neither

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