Posted by tracerace11 (288 posts) -

EDIT: This was almost a year ago. Check later in the discussion where I have updated where I am at. But I didn't want to delete in case someone else needed the comments below.

TL:DR I was a freaking wuss here, and I am alright. Working towards great things.

Thanks guys.

I am 25 years old. I am in my third year of teaching at a local middle school. I have taught part time at local community colleges. I enjoy math, and I am good at teaching math, but I am not sure if I do enjoy teaching. On top of that, I do not know if I will enjoy teaching for another 7+ years. I kind of feel like a freshman in college, unsure of the path I want to take (which by the way happened when I was a freshman in college).

Maybe this is just stress related (teacher, assistant football coach, head boys' soccer coach, part time adjunct at a community college, graduate student at local university, and 9 month old child). Maybe this is normal to get three years into a job and not be sure if I want to continue down this path. Maybe my personality I just want to try something new.

Over the summer I started working on codecademy.com. I went through the web essentials course and the javascript course. I enjoyed them pretty well, but now that school has started back (and you see my schedule) I don't have time to continue to develop my abilities and skills in this field.

I have been contacted by a couple other counties about teaching for them (like I said I am good at teaching. As far as I know, I am one of the few teachers to receive top marks my first two years of teaching). I also know that I am sought out since I teach math (highly qualified K-12).

So what do I do? I know that if it is in my control, I really do not want to be at my school again next year (love the school and students, but despise what the county is doing). I want to be in another county or school system. I think I might would enjoy teaching full time at a community college, but it is a bit difficult to get a full time job with only a bachelors in mathematics. I will have 18 hours of graduate work finished at the end of May, so I could possibly look into taking enough math graduate courses to make me more marketable for a full time position at a community college.

Or do I take this opportunity to break away and look at entry level positions in other industries, or stay with education, let the schedule settle down, and continue to work on codecademy.com (or another website that has similar offerings such as codeavengers)? I enjoyed working this summer on coding, and I would like to continue to do so, whether through online courses or taking classes at my community college.

I know I didn't get to specific with much of this. I really just wanted to get some of these ideas and thoughts somewhere and not solely in my mind anymore. Any thoughts or advice is appreciated.

#1 Edited by Slag (3989 posts) -

Sounds to me that you don't want to teach. Nothing you said makes me think you actually enjoy it. And if you don't enjoy it then why do it?

Better to leave now (or maybe next summer now that school has started if you can last) while you are on good terms with your bosses. That might not be true if you stay and your unhappiness affects your performance.

Do that other thing and if it sucks you can always go back to teaching. Being a qualified math teacher you'll probably always have opportunities.

The worst is living with regrets.

#2 Edited by Milkman (16514 posts) -

Start slinging dope. You're already teaching at a middle school and community college so you have a TON of potential buyers.

#3 Posted by guiseppe (2837 posts) -

Ironically, I know what I want to be, and I want to be a teacher.

#4 Edited by Slag (3989 posts) -

Also might want to delink your twitter from GB, from what you've shared your employer could potentially infer your identity and the fact you don't want to stay at your job based on what you've left around if they are snooping. This day and age I think you have to assume they are.

#5 Posted by awesomeusername (4153 posts) -

I hate math

#6 Posted by ManMadeGod (1552 posts) -

There is no such thing as a dream job. The faster you realize this the better. You can code on the side as a hobby, but stick with teaching and get hired full time. Welcome to the "real world".

#7 Posted by Video_Game_King (35975 posts) -

There is no such thing as a dream job.

What about a Freudian psychotherapist?

#8 Posted by Missacre (566 posts) -

There is no such thing as a dream job. The faster you realize this the better. You can code on the side as a hobby, but stick with teaching and get hired full time. Welcome to the "real world".

Maybe not to you. I got my dream job a couple of years ago and I've never been happier.

#9 Posted by Rick_Fingers (524 posts) -

If you're in a decent paying job you don't hate and you have a kid, I wouldn't be walking out and starting from scratch somewhere else.

Pull back on non-paying extracurricular activities and use the additional downtime to pursue coding or whatever else. Get yourself good enough and then consider a change in vocation.

I don't love my job, but it's good enough and pays great. It supports me, helps my wife and I save money and think about buying a house and having baby.

I'm also a published author, but not a good enough one to roll around in my millions of dollars. I would love to quit my job and write full time, and maybe I'll have that opportunity one day, after I've had more success and gotten myself into a position where success might be a realistic goal.

Now isn't that time.

#10 Posted by TheHumanDove (2523 posts) -

Be an airplane

#11 Posted by Flappy (2123 posts) -

Get into the porn industry; your mood may not improve, but at least you'll be bustin' nuts.

I hope you find happiness, homie.

#12 Posted by JasonR86 (9604 posts) -

Me neither.

Online
#13 Posted by djn3811 (52 posts) -

Unfortunately no one can answer the question of what you should do except for yourself. I am 21, have changed my major twice in college, and still have no idea what to do with my life. I kinda wish someone would just assign me my plan for my career and life, that would theoretically make things easier and much less stressful, but I guess that's the exciting part, figuring things out for yourself.

It sounds like you have something stable right now and with a young kid that might be what's best for now. You may have do what you want on the side, at least until you can get a foothold in your preferred career.

Good luck, I hope you make a decision and everything works out for you

#14 Posted by SSully (4125 posts) -

I am all for doing what you want and trying to live happy, but you really need to keep in mind that you have a family to support. I would stick with a paying job and learn new skills on the side. Unless you have a huge savings, which is unlikely for a teacher, then I dont imagine supporting your family will be very easy when trying to get an entry level position after messing around on codecademy.

As for continuing learning to code, codecademy is great, but it isn't the defacto way to learn. It teaches you good ground work, but it can lead to bad habbits. If you know what you want to program(web apps, data processing, games) then I suggest you pick up some books/take online classes(cousera, etc). The best way to learn to program is to learn the basics, and then pick a project. Start off with something small and work your way up. It's good to pick a project(like building a personal blog) because you will be fucking lost at first. But from that comes discovery and understanding.

I am still an undergrad and no expert by any means, but feel free to PM me if you have any programming questions.

#15 Posted by senrat (310 posts) -

Im a sophmore in college for computer engineering. I choose it for its combination of potential earnings and plentiful number of jobs. Im more interested in computers than most other fields, but im by no means passionate about it yet. I stopped thinking about scoring a mythical job that is both fulfilling and pays well a while ago. Hell, I dont even remotely know what my drean job would be.

#16 Posted by crusader8463 (14413 posts) -

It never hurts to look into other fields, but unless the job you go into is stable for a long time and will make enough money to raise the kid you just had don't go job hunting. The last thing you need is the stress of learning a new job on top of raising a kid. Save up for a few years and when you have enough stashed away then go job hopping.

Also, you could always fake your own death and start all over in a new life. Just putting options out there.

#17 Edited by audioBusting (1477 posts) -

Learning how to code is cool, but it takes a really long time to get good enough and there's no telling that you'll enjoy it at that point. I know people who loved doing IT and software development until they got their first job in the industry and summarily quit.

I don't know much about jack shit, but it sounds to me like you got some good options with what you've got (like you said, you have offers and qualifications and all) so it seems like a bad idea to jump ship so early. You got a kid to feed, man. We always need good science teachers anyway.

Anyways, good luck dude. Hope it'll all work out for you.

#18 Edited by believer258 (11621 posts) -

Dude, good teachers in public schools are rare. I won't ask you to stay there if you hate it, but I will ask you to think about what you can give to kids before deciding that you don't ever want to teach again. Also, it sounds like you have a steady job as a teacher, and that means a steady income for your family.

As for me, I've been looking into becoming a game designer but I don't know much code. I have ideas about how I'd like to design games, but don't know where to start. As a senior English major, time is short - I'm trying to read four novels and one epic at once while writing essays on all of them and a thesis on that epic. And there's a foreign language and upper-level history in there somewhere. Ain't got time for no math.

#19 Edited by Harkat (1100 posts) -

@slag said:

Also might want to delink your twitter from GB, from what you've shared your employer could potentially infer your identity and the fact you don't want to stay at your job based on what you've left around if they are snooping. This day and age I think you have to assume they are.

I was going to say, how the fuck do you do that? There's no option for it in profile settings.

#20 Posted by Slag (3989 posts) -

@harkat said:

@slag said:

Also might want to delink your twitter from GB, from what you've shared your employer could potentially infer your identity and the fact you don't want to stay at your job based on what you've left around if they are snooping. This day and age I think you have to assume they are.

I was going to say, how the fuck do you do that? There's no option for it in profile settings.

hot dang, it looks like you're right. Jeez I hope that's fixed soon or that I'm just missing that somewhere in the interface.

Maybe @rorie could help out the OP if he wants to do that?

#21 Posted by Turtlebird95 (2299 posts) -

@milkman said:

Start slinging dope. You're already teaching at a middle school and community college so you have a TON of potential buyers.

#22 Edited by Tireyo (6409 posts) -

I'm just a year younger than you, and I still don't have a job. Just be glad you have one, or have one lined up beforehand if you decide to quit a job. I cannot offer really any genuine advice, but go with your gut or what you think is the best thing to do.

#23 Posted by tracerace11 (288 posts) -

I just wanted to say thanks to everyone on here for their comments on this. I just happened upon my blog when checking out my profile to make some changes.

First, dang I sound pathetic lol. Man I sound like a freaking wuss. Oh well, this sounds like a time where I was seriously stressed out, and needed to vent. So thanks for allowing me that and not judging too harshly (you may have judged harshly, but thanks for not blasting it my way).

Second, I might should have disconnected my Twitter, but I didn't. I am kind of glad I didn't in a weird way. People need to see what teachers can sometimes go through (especially new ones where they are expected to take on every single thing for free and just the saying "Welcome to education.")

Thought I would give an update. I am still teaching, and still doing great at it. I actually have other schools trying to get me to come on. Some of these schools are where I grew up (and they pay more). I am considering that, but in the back of my mind, I know that I will not be in education for another 5 years.

I have already started working in web design/ development. I have been learning and working at a furious pace for the last month and a half (didn't have time in the middle of the school year with all I do). I have been throught Code Academy's HTML, CSS, Javascript, jQuery, and PHP tracks. I have also activated a month trial at Team Treehouse, and am going through the front end development track. I am really enjoying it. I have already made michaelshermantucker.com with what little I know.

I would say this to those looking at going into teaching... go for it. If anything, you will really learn how to work hard and not for money (btw, teachers and coaches get paid dirt, it is ridiculous). It also depends on the state you teach in. Just go with what you want, it is worth the experience.

Thanks again guys, and sorry for sounding like a freaking wuss almost a year ago.

#24 Edited by Demoskinos (14559 posts) -

@manmadegod said:

There is no such thing as a dream job. The faster you realize this the better. You can code on the side as a hobby, but stick with teaching and get hired full time. Welcome to the "real world".

Man, you have a dour outlook on life don't ya? There is absolutely such a thing as a dream job for some people. You just have to be dedicated enough to pursue it at whatever the cost.

#25 Posted by CABBAGES (519 posts) -

I would guess that probably at least 90% of people don't really like their job or actually hate it.

#26 Posted by Zevvion (1830 posts) -

@cabbages said:

I would guess that probably at least 90% of people don't really like their job or actually hate it.

Which all has to do with their ridiculous need for complying with expectations that people have of them. You're 'supposed' to go to school and then 'supposed' to pick a field and then 'supposed' to work at it. Over the course of my life, I've dropped out of several schools and educations 4 times. I kept switching, kept changing my mind and was determined to find something I enjoyed doing. Others around me mostly didn't. They picked something, were excited about it, did it, found out it wasn't for them, but kept at it anyway and now work in the field they don't like.

I had discussions with then several times over the last 10 years. They always judged me for dropping out, for not working at times and still being in school while they were already at a job and more. Now, I'm coming close to doing what I love. There is a chance it might not happen and it will take at least 2 years to get there, but there are very real possibilities for me now. I still talk to those people from time to time and some of them have been fired and out of work. Most of them depressed and typically hating monday for having to go back to work. Lost all joy in life.

I'm saying screw it. You need to have guts to pursue what you want. But fuck people who don't understand it and live their life in unhappiness just because they feel it is expected of them to follow that route. Those are the worst kinds of people that I know.

#27 Posted by craigieh28 (73 posts) -

I just wanted to say thanks to everyone on here for their comments on this. I just happened upon my blog when checking out my profile to make some changes.

First, dang I sound pathetic lol. Man I sound like a freaking wuss. Oh well, this sounds like a time where I was seriously stressed out, and needed to vent. So thanks for allowing me that and not judging too harshly (you may have judged harshly, but thanks for not blasting it my way).

Second, I might should have disconnected my Twitter, but I didn't. I am kind of glad I didn't in a weird way. People need to see what teachers can sometimes go through (especially new ones where they are expected to take on every single thing for free and just the saying "Welcome to education.")

Thought I would give an update. I am still teaching, and still doing great at it. I actually have other schools trying to get me to come on. Some of these schools are where I grew up (and they pay more). I am considering that, but in the back of my mind, I know that I will not be in education for another 5 years.

I have already started working in web design/ development. I have been learning and working at a furious pace for the last month and a half (didn't have time in the middle of the school year with all I do). I have been throught Code Academy's HTML, CSS, Javascript, jQuery, and PHP tracks. I have also activated a month trial at Team Treehouse, and am going through the front end development track. I am really enjoying it. I have already made michaelshermantucker.com with what little I know.

I would say this to those looking at going into teaching... go for it. If anything, you will really learn how to work hard and not for money (btw, teachers and coaches get paid dirt, it is ridiculous). It also depends on the state you teach in. Just go with what you want, it is worth the experience.

Thanks again guys, and sorry for sounding like a freaking wuss almost a year ago.

Hey duder, I am also a teacher, over in the UK and I can empathise (UK spelling) with your experience. I got chewed up and spit out by my previous school and nearly gave up the profession, but left and found a much more supportive school to work in. It does often feel as if the optimum situation for the UK government would be a constant conveyor belt of young, energetic, newly qualified teachers that they can run into the ground and burn out in five years, keeping the cycle going as they fill university and post-graduate places (sorry - got very cynical there).

However, teaching is a vocation and a passion, and once it's in your blood it's very difficult to let go of. One thing I can guarantee with teaching is that you will NEVER be bored, and working with young people who still have a lot to learn is much more acceptable to me than working with grown adults who I have worked with in the insurance industry (before I went into teaching) who really should know better.

It sounds like you have made your mind up to leave, but I think you might miss it more than you think...

#28 Posted by tracerace11 (288 posts) -

@tracerace11 said:

I just wanted to say thanks to everyone on here for their comments on this. I just happened upon my blog when checking out my profile to make some changes.

First, dang I sound pathetic lol. Man I sound like a freaking wuss. Oh well, this sounds like a time where I was seriously stressed out, and needed to vent. So thanks for allowing me that and not judging too harshly (you may have judged harshly, but thanks for not blasting it my way).

Second, I might should have disconnected my Twitter, but I didn't. I am kind of glad I didn't in a weird way. People need to see what teachers can sometimes go through (especially new ones where they are expected to take on every single thing for free and just the saying "Welcome to education.")

Thought I would give an update. I am still teaching, and still doing great at it. I actually have other schools trying to get me to come on. Some of these schools are where I grew up (and they pay more). I am considering that, but in the back of my mind, I know that I will not be in education for another 5 years.

I have already started working in web design/ development. I have been learning and working at a furious pace for the last month and a half (didn't have time in the middle of the school year with all I do). I have been throught Code Academy's HTML, CSS, Javascript, jQuery, and PHP tracks. I have also activated a month trial at Team Treehouse, and am going through the front end development track. I am really enjoying it. I have already made michaelshermantucker.com with what little I know.

I would say this to those looking at going into teaching... go for it. If anything, you will really learn how to work hard and not for money (btw, teachers and coaches get paid dirt, it is ridiculous). It also depends on the state you teach in. Just go with what you want, it is worth the experience.

Thanks again guys, and sorry for sounding like a freaking wuss almost a year ago.

Hey duder, I am also a teacher, over in the UK and I can empathise (UK spelling) with your experience. I got chewed up and spit out by my previous school and nearly gave up the profession, but left and found a much more supportive school to work in. It does often feel as if the optimum situation for the UK government would be a constant conveyor belt of young, energetic, newly qualified teachers that they can run into the ground and burn out in five years, keeping the cycle going as they fill university and post-graduate places (sorry - got very cynical there).

However, teaching is a vocation and a passion, and once it's in your blood it's very difficult to let go of. One thing I can guarantee with teaching is that you will NEVER be bored, and working with young people who still have a lot to learn is much more acceptable to me than working with grown adults who I have worked with in the insurance industry (before I went into teaching) who really should know better.

It sounds like you have made your mind up to leave, but I think you might miss it more than you think...

I do enjoy teaching and coaching. And I might miss it full time, but wherever I go I plan on doing math and coding camps (have two planned this summer) so I still can have those moments to teach. I also figure I will go on and coach soccer for either a club team or rec team just so I can continue coaching the game I love. Teaching will never leave, but I think teaching as a profession is tedious and too frustrating now. Children learn so much outside of school now from camps and other opportunities, and I think that is where I would rather go. Saying all that, I have been at 3 different schools this week, whether it be interviewing or conducting interviews (crazy, I just have 3 years experience, and I am the one conducting interviews). So I may be teaching for the next year or couple of years, but I see teaching opportunities outside a school environment.

BTW, hold the faith man. We are helping students. It may not be exactly what we thought it would be, but an influence is an influence. I am thankful for the years and opportunities I have had to help students not only in math, but also in real life situations and planning. But this is my first full time job, so maybe getting away from it all might bring me back, or might allow me to find new opportunities to help and teach others.