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#51 Posted by Dimi3je (422 posts) -

Keep it up man! That's one of the best things you can do for yourself. I quit cold turkey three months ago after almost 15 years of smoking. It was really hard during the first week, but after that it was ok. Now I just kinda remember it fondly from time to time.

#52 Posted by Humanity (11128 posts) -

The worst part is that when I go to parties everyone smokes there and it's sometimes tempting after several drinks to bum a cigarette. Also it's very ironic that even after I've quit, I'll come home from some friendly outing and all my clothes still smell like cigarettes.

#53 Edited by Seppli (11233 posts) -

Stop buying cigarettes and avoid triggers. Like drinking beer with smoker friends at a bar or something. The triggers you can't or don't want to avoid, those are the tricky ones. Like smoking a cig after a good meal, or after sex. Post or pre poop cigarettes are tough to quit too.

You always remember the awesome feelings of relief you had in the past. That feeling of acquiring freedom one drag at a time. Every 30 minutes or so. Once a smoker, always a smoker. Doesn't mean you have to smoke though. Just remember the good times fondly, but be assured in your stance that the good times smoking are in the past, and you can no longer afford to smoke.

As a smoker, you are broke. Ran out of health you can consciously pay with. I'd love to smoke, but I feel like my lungs and whatnot can no longer pay the price. Hope it helps. Also - strong menthol-heavy mints help with that oral fixation. Been pretty much smoke free since 5 years. After like 10 years of rather heavy smoking. I guess I average about 5 cigs a year. 2014 might be the first year with a tally of zero.

Hang in there.

#54 Edited by SSully (4585 posts) -

Fuck yeah duder, don't give up. This will be one of the best decisions you have ever made.

#55 Edited by Aelric (437 posts) -

I quit in a few years ago. The trick I used is isolation. I was staying with my folks for a few months where there were none in the house and I didn't have a car and they are out most days, so I was stuck in the house. Add to that that their house is far from any store. I basically never left for the first month. This also led me to exercising too, which I think helps you not want to smoke as well. After the first month, I started taking walks into town, which takes about a hour to do, and didn't get tempted to buy while I was shopping. I still get a twinge seeing someone smoke in a movie, but for the most part I think I can hold out from this point on. you just need to get past that first 8 weeks or so.

I personally think that the patch sets folks up to fail, but that is just me. If it helps you, great, just don't fall into the traps where you swap a bad thing for another. I have a friend that quit smoking 10 years ago but still chews nicotine gum every day. Also, vaping is crap, it's just a different form of the same thing and more insidious because it's smoother. If you vape, you might feel better but there is still nicotine fucking up your body and FAR too often, like the patch or gum, people think it'll help them quit but it just becomes their new habit, same as smoking was. Vaping is not quiting, I don't care what the cultish vapeing subculture claims. Also, vape people are hyper defensive and slavishly loyal to their habit. Nothing that creates those reactions is good for you, be it chemicals or ideas. I mean, just look at whoever replies or quotes me in this thread to defend it, I'm sure a few will.

Anyway, the important thing is that you are on the path.Good luck, there isn't anything good bout smoking.

#56 Edited by PulledaBrad (631 posts) -

@joshwent said:

Maybe considering vaping more or regularly to start with? The great thing about that is that you still get the ritual and behavioral satisfaction that you might miss from cigs, but you can gradually lessen the amount of nicotine that you ingest.

This, times a million, this has the important thing. The e-cig has been super important to this process. Like I said, I do freelance video, and I'm used to breaking up work (esp during renders and whatever random downtime) with trips out to my patio to smoke.

Keeping this ritual has been clutch, because it's a powerful trigger, psychologically. So I still physically go out there, and replace the real cigarette with the fog machine nightmare e-cig. It's still not right, but it's enough to get through the moment. It's worked for other triggers as well, like waking up, and getting in the car to drive somewhere.

Getting in the car is a super ritualistic exercise, with seatbelt, keys, all these little things you do, and cigarettes are meshed right in there, and have been since I've been old enough to drive. So the eCigs have helped tremendously there too.

And, yeah, if the ultimate fate of this attempt is that I start vaping regularly, that's still way better than where I was. I'm making the attempt to drop it all out completely, but degrees of success are still success. Thank you for the encouragement, @joshwent

@pompouspizza I wish you all the luck. I know some people who have only been able to quit cold turkey, without extra aid, and I know how hard it was for them. I've tried it, but I'm having more success now, with patches and ecigs, than I ever had cold turkey. Everyone's different, and just making the attempt is a big deal. Congrats, and good for you. You'll get there.

What kind of ecigs are you using? Ive found having 2 types have helped. The "BLU" style for being out and about an the larger wand type for at home. (I dont know the terminology because it all sounds fucking stupid.) The BLU style is smaller and more cig like which helps with the substitution angle and the larger one for some down and dirty smokin.

#57 Edited by diz (982 posts) -

@aelric said:

I quit in a few years ago. The trick I used is isolation. I was staying with my folks for a few months where there were none in the house and I didn't have a car and they are out most days, so I was stuck in the house. Add to that that their house is far from any store. I basically never left for the first month. This also led me to exercising too, which I think helps you not want to smoke as well. After the first month, I started taking walks into town, which takes about a hour to do, and didn't get tempted to buy while I was shopping. I still get a twinge seeing someone smoke in a movie, but for the most part I think I can hold out from this point on. you just need to get past that first 8 weeks or so.

I personally think that the patch sets folks up to fail, but that is just me. If it helps you, great, just don't fall into the traps where you swap a bad thing for another. I have a friend that quit smoking 10 years ago but still chews nicotine gum every day. Also, vaping is crap, it's just a different form of the same thing and more insidious because it's smoother. If you vape, you might feel better but there is still nicotine fucking up your body and FAR too often, like the patch or gum, people think it'll help them quit but it just becomes their new habit, same as smoking was. Vaping is not quiting, I don't care what the cultish vapeing subculture claims. Also, vape people are hyper defensive and slavishly loyal to their habit. Nothing that creates those reactions is good for you, be it chemicals or ideas. I mean, just look at whoever replies or quotes me in this thread to defend it, I'm sure a few will.

Anyway, the important thing is that you are on the path.Good luck, there isn't anything good bout smoking.

I've been vaping for 2 years now and have not touched a cigarette since I started vaping. I had been smoking for over 30 years, so would have found it difficult to even conceive of stopping smoking if I had not found vaping as an alternative.

I appreciate that vaping is only a "harm reduction" alternative to smoking and that I am still addicted to nicotine. I also know that nicotine is not the harmful aspect of smoking too, hence it's usage in all the medically certified alternatives to smoking (patches, sprays, gum, etc). Smoking involves inhaling carcinogens, tar, carbon monoxide and thousands of other combustion compounds, whereas vaping does not. Please understand this important distinction that challenges your above post.

I consider vaping to be far less risky than smoking and think it has improved my own health considerably.

For the OP, I would suggest researching the various flavours (I make my own "RY4") and methods of vaping (I use "Genesis" style atomisers). The right set-up could give you the most appropriate, inexpensive and effective vape that would enable you to do without cigarettes entirely and not miss them at all.

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#58 Posted by PandaBear (1479 posts) -

Shoulda never started.

Just don't buy any more, that way you can't smoke them.

Exactly. Praising someone for giving up smoking is stupid. You shouldn't earn praise for not doing something you shouldn't do anyway.

Frankly most people who quit whine so much about how hard it is I'd rather they just smoked again and shut up about it.

It's not an achievement, you're just back to square one. Congratulations.

#59 Edited by eskimo (493 posts) -

@pandabear: What an incredibly shitty thing to say.

@indieslaw - Well done dude, quitting smoking takes incredible amounts of self control. You've already got the hardest part beat, the physical withdrawals. Now it's on to beating the process of rituals that you;ve built up around smoking. You need to find other outlets for your energy when you encounter a situation where you would normally go out for a smoke. EG. maybe you could put a boxing bag on your patio so during renders you go and and punch it for a while. You're still going to want to smoke afterwards, but it'll give you something to take your mind off it for a few minutes, as well as channelling your energy into something positive. Exercise is a really great way to burn off stress, and it's good for you too. Playing games is also a great way to occupy your mind, I imagine that you've got a few options there. I took up learning a musical instrument, which turned out to be excellent at taking my mind off my stresses and problems. With a little bit of work, you can turn those negative feelings into something positive and productive.

Good luck, and stay strong, it's easy to not smoke when you're in a good mood, but when you're really down and out is when you need to be the strongest. You can do it!

#60 Edited by Fattony12000 (7892 posts) -

#61 Posted by andmm (221 posts) -

When you're felling the need to smoke one, just remember this video:

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=6a9_1392193022

*Graphic Content*

Just watch this and remember that black disgusting, malfunctioning lung. Bet that's gonna help!

Never understood why people start smoking in the first place. It costs you so much money over time(including your health) and there's absolutely not a single positive with the whole thing. But you look cool doing it! totally worth it.

Keep it up duder, best decision you could have made regarding this garbage.

#62 Edited by Khann (3008 posts) -
@andmm said:

there's absolutely not a single positive with the whole thing.

It makes you feel good, most smokers enjoy the taste and they can be a great way to socialise. I'd say those are positives. That's not to say the positives outweigh the negatives, but saying there isn't a single positive is silly. Also I would wager that very few people outside of high school smoke to "look cool".

#63 Posted by PandaBear (1479 posts) -

@eskimo said:

@pandabear: What an incredibly shitty thing to say.

@indieslaw - Well done dude, quitting smoking takes incredible amounts of self control. You've already got the hardest part beat, the physical withdrawals. Now it's on to beating the process of rituals that you;ve built up around smoking. You need to find other outlets for your energy when you encounter a situation where you would normally go out for a smoke. EG. maybe you could put a boxing bag on your patio so during renders you go and and punch it for a while. You're still going to want to smoke afterwards, but it'll give you something to take your mind off it for a few minutes, as well as channelling your energy into something positive. Exercise is a really great way to burn off stress, and it's good for you too. Playing games is also a great way to occupy your mind, I imagine that you've got a few options there. I took up learning a musical instrument, which turned out to be excellent at taking my mind off my stresses and problems. With a little bit of work, you can turn those negative feelings into something positive and productive.

Good luck, and stay strong, it's easy to not smoke when you're in a good mood, but when you're really down and out is when you need to be the strongest. You can do it!

Shitty how exactly? You shouldn't be praised for giving up something that we all have known for decades is a waste of money and kills you. This is not a secret. I mean if someone says "hey I'm going to take up smoking" you'd tell them it's a bad idea (I'd call them an idiot), but when they quit they've done some amazing thing that we should all praise? Fuck that, don't smoke. We all make choices in life and having a crutch like smoking and playing the victim 'because it's soooo hard to quit' is weak.

You sound like you used to smoke so you're taking this personally, and hey I'm sure it's hard. I have family members who smoke and I have wayyy more who have died of cancer. I know heaps of people who die well before their time ... and some of them didn't smoke a day in their life. The point is smoking is selfish and pointless and when you know someone who has got cancer at no fault of their own you wonder why the fuck anyone would openly choose to increase their risk of getting it. It's moronic.

#64 Edited by indieslaw (455 posts) -

@goreyfantod : I've tried snus in the past, but didn't like it much. I might keep it in mind for an extreme craving though, it seems like it might work pretty quickly in that scenario.

@striderno9: That's really surprising to me, the hypnosis thing. I tend to be skeptical of hypnosis, though. If it worked for them, that's all that matters, but I don't think it's for me.

@singular: Good work dude. Each new tag is another victory. But maybe quit at 1,000 ;).

@eskimo: Thanks dude, the support is much appreciated.

@pulledabrad: I'm going with the Mystics. I can buy them where I buy my nicotine patches, which is the main reason. I liked the Blu's, but the starter kit I bought had a weird charging system that required the pack to be in use, and I wasn't so much into that. So far the Mystics are treating me just fine.

Thanks to everyone else who is well-wishing, it's very much appreciated.

#65 Posted by Vahleticar (196 posts) -

@indieslaw: how are you doing? I just quit last week after 8 yrs of heavy smoking. I didn't leave the house and just played mass effect till the cravings went away!

#66 Edited by Devil240Z (3799 posts) -

Just wanted to drop in and show support. You can do it!

I'm really glad that my only experiences with cigarettes are all associated with massive hangovers. Cause for some reason if someone offers me a cig while I'm drinking I just cant say no. but I can see how people get addicted. Anyway keep it up and don't give up.

#67 Edited by Samael2138 (249 posts) -

After 19 years of smoking I quit in Dec 2013, and although I still have an occasional craving, it has gotten to the point where I can't fathom smoking one again.

I have already saved over $1000 in the 6 months since, and at the end of the year will save another thousand. I truly enjoy the PS4 and Xbox One that I have purchased with said funds(although I have a ganglion cyst on my right wrist that has kept me from playing for awhile, but thats unrelated). I cannot believe the amount of $ I was spending, just to basically kill myself.

My lung capacity has improved, and I can actually taste things again. Trust me, the benefits of quitting far outweigh the temporary relinquishment of the cravings.

Good luck, and hang in there!

#68 Edited by TrafalgarLaw (1717 posts) -

@samael2138 said:

My lung capacity has improved, and I can actually taste things again.

I commend you for quitting smoking, it's a hard thing to do and even harder to stay clean of that toxic mixture of substances. Watch out though, most people who quit gain weight due to be able to taste things better, thus eating and enjoying more food.

Though I have to correct you on lung capacity. Your lung capacity declines each year with 30 ml, even more in those that smoke. Since you have to do with what you got for a full lifetime, you should treasure your lungs by not inhaling toxins present in for example sigarettes. What did improve is the function of your lungs and the capacity of your cardiovascular system. I'd hate to be a downer but you'll have to live the rest of your life with the damage done to your lungs. If you stop early, it shouldn't become a problem later in life.

I urge people to in the first place to not start smoking at all. From the moment you stop smoking, you retain an elevated risk on lung cancer for the rest of your life. More common is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in particular lungemphysema that happens with long-time smokers. It is a terrible disease to experience when you're 50-70 due to bad life choices you made when you were in your teen age or young adult life. My point is, it's not all roses and sunshine when you stop smoking. You carry the consequences of your life choices with you. But you just might be able to smell roses again!

#69 Posted by Samael2138 (249 posts) -

@trafalgarlaw: Yep, I gained around 20 pounds, but started dieting and exercising, so I've already started to lose it.

Although my lung capacity might not have technically improved, as a vocalist, I find it far more easy to sustain notes for longer periods of time, and do not have to be so rigid in finding gaps for breath. I can even spit rhymes from some of my favorite songs(Bone-Thugs, Twista, Busta) without being winded, something that just a few months ago was a notable problem.

I count that as improvement!

#70 Edited by SomberOwl (841 posts) -

I'm fishing around the idea of starting to smoke.

#71 Edited by TrafalgarLaw (1717 posts) -

It certainly is. Nicotine relaxes smooth muscles of your upper airway tract. Quitting smoking reverses it and gives you more control over your airways. Quitting smoking also gives you a better exhalation speed and a much better airflow in general. But just do some regular checkups at your GP, for bloodpressure, lungs etc. 19 years is a lot smoking.

#72 Posted by Casey25 (146 posts) -

You're making the right decision duder! You should give sunflower seeds a try as a supplemental oral fixation, I recommend Dill Pickle flavored Spitz sunflower seeds.

I like these just on their own, I don't even smoke. It's a habit i picked up from my many years of baseball.

Most people find them disgusting, though.

#73 Edited by Vrikk (1082 posts) -

Best of luck, duder. It's hard - I've been there, but it can be done.

#74 Posted by Breadfan (6803 posts) -

Keep it up, duder. I've quit cold turkey for about four months now and it does get a whole lot more manageable. Just remind yourself of how much a pain in the ass it has been quitting so far - by lighting up you are just starting the whole process over again.

#75 Edited by EthanielRain (971 posts) -

@pandabear Being an asshole is known to have health risks associated with it, both for yourself and the people around you. If you ever decide to quit, you have my support.

If anyone wants to quit smoking, but feels like they can't...Chantix was a wonder drug for me. I didn't even want to quit, just agreed to try the medication for my girlfriend. After a week I had absolutely no desire to smoke and zero withdrawals. I even tried smoking a couple times just because I couldn't believe it; and it tasted so nasty I put the cigarette out after a couple puffs.

#76 Edited by indieslaw (455 posts) -

@vahleticar: Hey, it's been going very well. It sounds like you're doing well, too. Stick with it! It can be hard, and it being hard can be cyclical. But Mass Effect is as good a way to take your mind off it as I can think of! :D

I still get intense cravings sometimes, and there are some social situations where I haven't really known what to do with myself. But even though it's been hard, I'm through the worst of it. I think the only real danger now is getting cocky, and thinking I could handle one cigarette, if I wanted. That's quicksand.

I certainly don't spit venom like in the first post of this thread anymore. That was probably the darkest moment of this whole endeavor. I feel kind of awkward about it now, but oh well. It's a good reminder of how affecting trying to kick a habit can be.

@samael2138: Sounds like you're doing well, too. Good job. I've been shocked by the money I'm saving, also. Its unreal how expensive it is, and how little you notice that fact when you consider smoking a necessity.

#77 Posted by HatKing (6361 posts) -

I smoked once, then one day decided not to and didn't. It wasn't too hard for me, and I'm not sure why. I was okay bumming one or two off a friend about once a week, if I was drinking. I don't even do that anymore. I've lost the desire entirely now.

#78 Posted by benspyda (2108 posts) -

Quitting any addiction feels terrible in the beginning, but once your body and brain stops demanding it, you can enjoy other things more than you did while you were addicted. Addictions keep us happy in the short term but are never fullfilling long term. Free yourself from addictions and you'll enjoy life more long term! Keep it up!

#79 Posted by gba1989 (14 posts) -

@indieslaw: It's easy to quit smoking, temporarily that is. Remembered the time when I didn't smoke for 3 years because I kept myself busy and then one day saw a relative smoking and *poof* .

But anyways, you can really quit smoking - my uncle did quit after more than 30 years of smoking. If it's one motivation that smokers need, just think of the medication bills you have to spend if you had lung disease due to smoking.

#80 Posted by PandaBear (1479 posts) -

@ethanielrain: As opposed to being an internet tough guy which carries no risks whatsoever. Stay cool.

#81 Edited by John1912 (2063 posts) -

@indieslaw said:

It's the stupidest thing I ever did. All I want is a cigarette. That's all it would take.

I'm a smoker, it's a big part of how I identify myself. I live in Utah, if that helps explain why it's an identity thing. If I pull this off, I'll still be a smoker, just a smoker-in-abeyance.

I'm 5 weeks in. Using patches, and vaping during rough spots. I've been short on work lately. I do freelance video production. The days and weeks have kind of been blending into each other, which seemed like an ideal time to try and kick an addiction.

What a load of shit.

To anyone considering quitting smoking, only do it if you're the type of broken asshole who finds the purest comfort in misery. Smoke yourself happy, if you're smart.

/vent

Anyone looking to quit get some Chantix, that shit is fucking AMAZING! I was a pack a day for 5 years. Tried to quit a few times with patches. Took Chantix for like 2-3 weeks while smoking. I didnt even finish the month pack of Chanitx I had. It shuts off the nicotine receptors in your brain. No withdrawal. Cigs start to taste kinda bad, you dont get the buzz from the nicotine because your brain cant process it, so you actually dont even want to smoke anymore. After like a week they just didnt taste right, Id have one here and there, but just couldnt even finish one anymore. One of the best things I ever did!

#82 Edited by ShaggE (7024 posts) -

Regarding Chantix: Be careful with that stuff if you suffer from depression. I tried it, and it sent me into the worst lows I've ever known. It was terrifying. Shame, as I heard great things about it, but I was a complete wreck almost immediately.

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#83 Edited by John1912 (2063 posts) -

@shagge said:

Regarding Chantix: Be careful with that stuff if you suffer from depression. I tried it, and it sent me into the worst lows I've ever known. It was terrifying. Shame, as I heard great things about it, but I was a complete wreck almost immediately.

Ive had more then a fair share of depression over my life time. Fortunately I had no side effects with the Chantix. I dont really seem to get many side effects from medications, or fairly minimal. Sorry to hear you had probs with it. Far as works as advertised, Chantix was the best thing Ive ever taken hands down. I wish stuff like prozac or the other anti depressant meds Ive tried worked anywhere near as well. Either they stop working after a few months, or they just gave me a placebo effect.

#84 Posted by Zleunamme (755 posts) -

I wish you the best of luck.

#85 Edited by TomTroller (16 posts) -

Good for you.

#86 Posted by ian280291 (139 posts) -

I quit in August for about five weeks then some guys at work kept giving me them so now i smoke one a day, five days a week when I'm at work for free!

#87 Posted by SoulCane (6 posts) -

That's good to hear.

#88 Posted by dudeglove (8967 posts) -

Ask a doctor friend to let you tour the amputee unit at a hospital. You'll find that one side effect of smoking that (at least to me) doesn't get talked about enough is the risk of your friggin veins necrotizing, meaning you need to get your goddamn limbs chopped off. Admittedly this is only after decades of hardcore smoking in advanced age, and you're probably more likely to get a respiratory problem first and/or cancer, but I'd rather have all my limbs than none at all.

#89 Posted by Wolverine (4570 posts) -

@indieslaw: I feel you man. I fucking love smoking, but unfortunately it just isn't sustainable.

#90 Edited by bybeach (5136 posts) -

I personally would not(and did not) do Chantix. For I did not and I do not trust it. Instead I worked myself down w/patches. That was 20 plus years ago, and I still miss nicotine. Enough that e-cigs make me interested. But not near enough, to my own surprise..

The addiction does break, thankfully. Wanting is a far cry from that craving. But be warned, your neurochemistry always has a place for nicotine. It is truly an addicting substance. I suspect not all of that is bad. Schizophrenics often use tobacco to collect their thoughts, and my own experience does not surprise me there. Watch anybody quietly puff on a cigg.

But I think there is much better ways. Addiction sucks.