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#1 Posted by xxheartstation (14 posts) -

waaaow. what a FILM personally i enjoyed tyler durden's sunglasses the most

#2 Posted by Grissefar (2842 posts) -

Too bad the 2nd half sucks a giant dick.

#3 Posted by SamStrife (1282 posts) -

@Grissefar said:

Too bad the 2nd half sucks a giant dick.

This.

#4 Posted by ImmortalSaiyan (4676 posts) -

@SamStrife said:

@Grissefar said:

Too bad the 2nd half sucks a giant dick.

This.

Why do you two say that?

#5 Posted by Gizmo (5389 posts) -

I haven't clicked with Fight Club or Seven as of yet. There's something about Brad Pitt that makes me not want to watch anything with him leading. On paper, I should love both of these films, but i'm just left wondering what the big deal is when it comes to both films.

#6 Posted by Ravenlight (8040 posts) -

just watched fight club for the first time

27 more times and you've got a Limp Bizkit song.

LOL REMAMBAR HI SKOOL GUISE

#7 Edited by SamStrife (1282 posts) -

@ImmortalSaiyan To be honest the one time I watched it, I wasn't thoroughly enjoying the first half so when the second half went off in a direction it did, that just kind of threw me. The "twist" is fine and well done but the actions of the people in the film are pretty far fetched. "I wish it was more grounded," is the best way to describe my feelings for it, I think.

#8 Edited by Inkerman (1451 posts) -

@SamStrife said:

@ImmortalSaiyanTo be honest the one time I watched it, I wasn't thoroughly enjoying the first half so when the second half went off in a direction it did, that just kind of threw me. The "twist" is fine and well done but the actions of the people in the film are pretty far fetched. "I wish it was more grounded," is the best way to describe my feelings for it, I think.

You could argue that the reason the film is so not 'grounded' is because most of the primary characters are disturbed in some way. The Narrator, Tyler and the girlfriend (I can't remember her name) are all actually crazy in one way or another, Tyler's army are all arguably driven mad both by Tyler's indoctrination, but also by society. You never actually see a perspective from someone who isn't insane. The few characters which are 'normal', are in fact, normal, like for example the Narrator's boss and in the second half the police detective.

#9 Posted by SamStrife (1282 posts) -

@Inkerman said:

You could argue that the reason the film is so not 'grounded' is because most of the primary characters are disturbed in some way. The Narrator, Tyler and the girlfriend (I can't remember her name) are all actually crazy in one way or another, Tyler's army are all arguably driven mad both by Tyler's indoctrination, but also by society. You never actually see a perspective from someone who isn't insane. The few characters which are 'normal', are in fact, normal, like for example the Narrator's boss and in the second half the police detective.

Which is fine if the people in the film weren't doing crazy-ass crap like blowing up buildings and stuff. If it had remained a psychological battle and not go all out extremist terrorist then I would have probably enjoyed it a lot more.

It was like 6 years ago I watched it and I suspect I'm forgetting a lot of key things about it. Maybe I should check it out again...

#10 Edited by Inkerman (1451 posts) -

@SamStrife said:

Which is fine if the people in the film weren't doing crazy-ass crap like blowing up buildings and stuff. If it had remained a psychological battle and not go all out extremist terrorist then I would have probably enjoyed it a lot more.

It was like 6 years ago I watched it and I suspect I'm forgetting a lot of key things about it. Maybe I should check it out again...

Again (and there are like a million different interpretations for this film) you could argue that the Narrator's internal psychological battle is merely being mirrored externally in society at large by the Spacemonkeys (Tyler's terror group). You gotta remember that the Narrator's own psychological problems are not internal in origin, it's society which has created the Narrator's mental issue and that is arguably why Tyler wants to destroy society. The psychological battle cannot be resolved without resolving the wider battle against society.

#11 Posted by DeiNile (46 posts) -

@SamStrife: You should. It remains a fantastic piece of cinema.

#12 Posted by SamStrife (1282 posts) -

@Inkerman: @DeiNile:Yeah maybe I will go watch it again then. When I first did I wasn't really at the age where I would look into the deeper meaning of things like that but now I do it with pretty much every movie I watch. Maybe I'll see it through fresh eyes this time. Heck, I may even post back in this thread with my thoughts.

#13 Posted by Inkerman (1451 posts) -

@SamStrife said:

@Inkerman: @DeiNile:Yeah maybe I will go watch it again then. When I first did I wasn't really at the age where I would look into the deeper meaning of things like that but now I do it with pretty much every movie I watch. Maybe I'll see it through fresh eyes this time. Heck, I may even post back in this thread with my thoughts.

I rewatched it a year ago, and was thinking about the deeper meanings for pretty much a whole week (I also immediately wrote a short story afterward). There's basically a million different interpretations, everything from the aforementioned psychological battle mirrored in society (or as an analogy of one's own battle to reconcile our internal selves with our public ones) to an updated retelling of a Marxist revolution from today's 'workers', the white collar class.

#14 Posted by Grissefar (2842 posts) -

@Inkerman said:

@SamStrife said:

@Inkerman: @DeiNile:Yeah maybe I will go watch it again then. When I first did I wasn't really at the age where I would look into the deeper meaning of things like that but now I do it with pretty much every movie I watch. Maybe I'll see it through fresh eyes this time. Heck, I may even post back in this thread with my thoughts.

I rewatched it a year ago, and was thinking about the deeper meanings for pretty much a whole week (I also immediately wrote a short story afterward). There's basically a million different interpretations, everything from the aforementioned psychological battle mirrored in society (or as an analogy of one's own battle to reconcile our internal selves with our public ones) to an updated retelling of a Marxist revolution from today's 'workers', the white collar class.

@Inkerman said:

@SamStrife said:

Which is fine if the people in the film weren't doing crazy-ass crap like blowing up buildings and stuff. If it had remained a psychological battle and not go all out extremist terrorist then I would have probably enjoyed it a lot more.

It was like 6 years ago I watched it and I suspect I'm forgetting a lot of key things about it. Maybe I should check it out again...

Again (and there are like a million different interpretations for this film) you could argue that the Narrator's internal psychological battle is merely being mirrored externally in society at large by the Spacemonkeys (Tyler's terror group). You gotta remember that the Narrator's own psychological problems are not internal in origin, it's society which has created the Narrator's mental issue and that is arguably why Tyler wants to destroy society. The psychological battle cannot be resolved without resolving the wider battle against society.

Sometimes, people look too much into things. With your imagination, you could easily interpret Donkey Kong as a social commentary on soap operas.

#15 Posted by Erk_Forever (157 posts) -

@Grissefar said:

@Inkerman said:

@SamStrife said:

@Inkerman: @DeiNile:Yeah maybe I will go watch it again then. When I first did I wasn't really at the age where I would look into the deeper meaning of things like that but now I do it with pretty much every movie I watch. Maybe I'll see it through fresh eyes this time. Heck, I may even post back in this thread with my thoughts.

I rewatched it a year ago, and was thinking about the deeper meanings for pretty much a whole week (I also immediately wrote a short story afterward). There's basically a million different interpretations, everything from the aforementioned psychological battle mirrored in society (or as an analogy of one's own battle to reconcile our internal selves with our public ones) to an updated retelling of a Marxist revolution from today's 'workers', the white collar class.

@Inkerman said:

@SamStrife said:

Which is fine if the people in the film weren't doing crazy-ass crap like blowing up buildings and stuff. If it had remained a psychological battle and not go all out extremist terrorist then I would have probably enjoyed it a lot more.

It was like 6 years ago I watched it and I suspect I'm forgetting a lot of key things about it. Maybe I should check it out again...

Again (and there are like a million different interpretations for this film) you could argue that the Narrator's internal psychological battle is merely being mirrored externally in society at large by the Spacemonkeys (Tyler's terror group). You gotta remember that the Narrator's own psychological problems are not internal in origin, it's society which has created the Narrator's mental issue and that is arguably why Tyler wants to destroy society. The psychological battle cannot be resolved without resolving the wider battle against society.

Sometimes, people look too much into things. With your imagination, you could easily interpret Donkey Kong as a social commentary on soap operas.

Prove it.

#16 Posted by HarlechQuinn (448 posts) -

I still think the ending is just awesome, but what can go wrong if you use the greatest Pixies song ever...

#17 Posted by Demoskinos (14778 posts) -

This is without a doubt my favorite film of all time. There is just so much going on in the film both from a story perspective and even just hidden easter eggs within the film. Its also a film that once you know the twist watching through a second time takes on a completely different meaning.

#18 Posted by bio595 (307 posts) -

Yo why the fuck are you talking about it man?

We've been over this. Twice!

Look forward to understanding even more nerd references!

One of my favourite movies. Made me go on a Fincher spree for a while.

#19 Posted by TheSouthernDandy (3859 posts) -

Fight club is amazing. One Of my favorite movies for sure. I don't think there's anything wrong with the second half

Online
#20 Posted by 49th (2735 posts) -

I love Fight Club, I saw it for the first time in a Film Studies class and I had to write an essay about it.

#21 Posted by D0tti (786 posts) -

  

#22 Posted by Dagbiker (6974 posts) -

1st rule of fight club:

YOU DO NOT TALK ABOUT FIGHT CLUB

#23 Posted by pornstorestiffi (4911 posts) -

Its a great movie, but haven't seen it since VHS where popular.

#24 Posted by ShadowConqueror (3050 posts) -

Fight Club is pretty good. It's a great example of David Fincher's talent.

#25 Posted by SmilingPig (1337 posts) -

I just dipped a Ritz cracker in diet Pepsi for the first time... Want to be best friends?

#26 Posted by MariachiMacabre (7079 posts) -

Great movie and great book.

#27 Posted by iam3green (14390 posts) -
#28 Posted by Lego_My_Eggo (1029 posts) -

@iam3green:

His split personality takes over sometimes and tells his followers what to do, and sometimes its the narrator telling them what to do. They are both aware of what the other is doing but only Tyler knows about the personality disorder till the end. If you looks close you can see Tyler flash on the screen like the cigaret burns he described, that is when you know Tyler is in control and you are seeing it from the narrators view.
#29 Posted by TheDudeOfGaming (6078 posts) -

@ImmortalSaiyan said:

@SamStrife said:

@Grissefar said:

Too bad the 2nd half sucks a giant dick.

This.

Why do you two say that?

Because they didn't like it? Regardless, I disagree.

#30 Posted by believer258 (11816 posts) -

I've never seen it, but I know the twist. I still want to see it.

#31 Posted by Hailinel (24429 posts) -

I watched it for the first time last year. It was entertaining in some ways, but so engrossed in its male power fantasy philosophy I had a difficult time connecting with any of the characters, especially the narrator/Tyler. And things just go over the top when the narrator/Tyler fight each other in the end before the narrator puts a gun in his own mouth, somehow killing Tyler without also killing himself. The film doesn't understand psychology very well, but then again, there's a lot that the film doesn't seem to understand.

#32 Posted by Zleunamme (656 posts) -

@ImmortalSaiyan: They still haven't figured out that Jack and Tyler are the same person. Fight Club is an awesome movie. People should Chuck Palahniuk's other books like Rant, Choke or Survivor.

#33 Posted by Rudeboy217 (1767 posts) -

It's okay

#34 Posted by FengShuiGod (1486 posts) -

@Hailinel said:

I watched it for the first time last year. It was entertaining in some ways, but so engrossed in its male power fantasy philosophy I had a difficult time connecting with any of the characters, especially the narrator/Tyler. And things just go over the top when the narrator/Tyler fight each other in the end before the narrator puts a gun in his own mouth, somehow killing Tyler without also killing himself. The film doesn't understand psychology very well, but then again, there's a lot that the film doesn't seem to understand.

The film doesn't try to be a treatise on psychology. The narrators condition serves as more of a macguffin really. Picking on the film for being hyperbolic, quirky, and crazy is fine, but that's what it tries to be. It's kinda like picking on Dr. Doolittle because the animals talk. Arguably there is a tonal shift that occurs in the latter half, but the flashes of Tyler, the hints dropped here and there, all show that it isn't some kind of lazy deus ex machina.

#35 Posted by drac96 (670 posts) -

I can't stand the ending of the movie. The ending to the book on the other hand is awesome.

#36 Posted by MechaKirby (202 posts) -

Its my favorite movie of all time! The only thing I never understood and maybe you guys can explain it, how does the narrator shooting himself at the end kill Tyler and not himself? And how did the book end?

#37 Posted by sissylion (679 posts) -

It's okay. A lot of the story and writing in it is pretty dumb and muddies up what is a pretty good book, but Fincher sure knows how to film a movie.

#38 Posted by wjb (1657 posts) -

I enjoy Fight Club, but that, The Matrix, and a few other films around that time spawned a bunch of creepy weirdo sociopaths in my high school and then in college. They love those films a little too much.

#39 Posted by Inkerman (1451 posts) -

@Grissefar said:

Sometimes, people look too much into things. With your imagination, you could easily interpret Donkey Kong as a social commentary on soap operas.

Of course, but Fight Club is not Donkey Kong, it is meant to have many underlying themes and many different interpretations. If you said Fight Club was a movie just about undergound boxing and a guy with a mental illness you would be wrong.

#40 Posted by ohnobruno (85 posts) -

I was 19 when the film came out and I had no idea what I was walking into. Who knows how many times I saw it in the two or three years afterwards and it blew my mind every time. But I probably haven't seen it since I was 22 and have no interest to. Like Fight Club itself, my interest and attraction to that film only existed during a certain time in my life. To be honest, I'm glad to be past that because those were a lot of negative feelings that I just don't relate to anymore.

But man, I just listened to that opening Dust Brothers track. Fuck. Maybe I will watch it again.

#41 Posted by TheHT (11155 posts) -

@Lego_My_Eggo said:

@iam3green:

His split personality takes over sometimes and tells his followers what to do, and sometimes its the narrator telling them what to do. They are both aware of what the other is doing but only Tyler knows about the personality disorder till the end. If you looks close you can see Tyler flash on the screen like the cigaret burns he described, that is when you know Tyler is in control and you are seeing it from the narrators view.

Also, Narrator would sometimes imagine himself in the crowd looking at Tyler, while Tyler is in control.

@Hailinel said:

I watched it for the first time last year. It was entertaining in some ways, but so engrossed in its male power fantasy philosophy I had a difficult time connecting with any of the characters, especially the narrator/Tyler. And things just go over the top when the narrator/Tyler fight each other in the end before the narrator puts a gun in his own mouth, somehow killing Tyler without also killing himself. The film doesn't understand psychology very well, but then again, there's a lot that the film doesn't seem to understand.

Funny you'd say that. I didn't get any male power fantasy vibes. Instead I got a "stop giving a fuck about stupid pointless shit" vibe.

Also, I always thought the gunshot killing Tyler but not Narrator was because it was the Narrator tricking himself into believing the shot went out the back of the head in order to 'kill' Tyler, who is after all only existent in his mind. Of course, the shot actually went out the, what was it, under his ear? It all happened in such a flash that it was enough to make the 'death' of Tyler plausible enough to for it to be real to Narrator, who afterwards is now totally in control of himself.

@MechaKirby: ^^^^ that's how I rationalized it anyway.

#42 Posted by teh_destroyer (3566 posts) -

Not much of a Fight Club fan myself, but 7even is one hell of a good movie.

#43 Edited by jakob187 (21665 posts) -

@Grissefar said:

Too bad the 2nd half sucks a giant dick yet follows the book pretty much word for word.

Fixed that for ya.

Also, it's a good movie. I feel like people miss the point of the movie under all the pseudo-psychological babble that gets spewed (it is, after all, a love story first and foremost). I also think it's funny that critics bashed the SHIT out of it when it originally came out, but now it's hailed as some marvel of film.

Nonetheless, it's a good movie. It's not OMG GREAT, but it's good.

#44 Posted by Roger778 (957 posts) -

The movie is both twisted, and awesome. The fight scenes in the club, are so realistic, and brutal, that you might wince a little. Plus, Brad Pitt, and Edward Norton were great together.

#45 Posted by Guided_By_Tigers (8061 posts) -
#46 Posted by tooPrime (343 posts) -

Fight Club gives me hope that my bad student novellas can be made into bad movies.

#47 Posted by doomguy77 (32 posts) -

Fight Club has excellent cinematography, like many of Fincher's movies.

As far as the story, I don't believe it's intended to be realistic exactly. It's masculist fiction, if anything can be called that. Tyler's what a lot of guys want to be like in some way or another, kind of a modern masculine ideal. Not in the cliched chest-beating machismo style, but in emulating a lot of characteristics that the average late teens to early thirties white guy wishes he had. Tyler just takes it the [il]logical extreme and becomes a fanatic anarcho-primitivist as a result.

What I took away from it was that you need to find a balance, like most things in life. In this case, don't waste your life looking for the perfect wallpaper, but don't go trying to blow up credit buildings either.

#48 Posted by BionicRadd (617 posts) -

I hated Fight Club the first time I watched it. The "fight club" aspect of it was uninteresting to me in every way and the only thing I really liked about it was the twist, which seemed awesome to me at the time. Since then, it's become one of my favorite films, but not for the reasons that most people seem to like it. Not that others are wrong, mind you, but it's just what I took away from it that made it so endearing to me. The second time I watched it, when it got to the scene in the limo and Tyler's monologue, I sort of had an awakening and have been in love with Fight Club ever since.

What gets me about Fight Club is the relationship between Tyler and the Narrator. Not even in the "Tyler is a subconscious manifestation of who the narrator wants to be" kinda way, either. You could excise the twist and keep them as two truly separate people and my opinion of the movie wouldn't change a bit. Tyler constantly pointing out how obsessed with unimportant shit the narrator is and the narrator's gradual realization that Tyler maybe had a point was a great character arch to watch.

Secondary to that is, of course, the overall message against consumerism and letting advertising tell us who we should be. Sure that message is flawed and hypocritical coming from a movie that got as much advertising and did as much "programming" of idiots as Fight Club did, but the message is still one I enjoy hearing. I remember seeing a fair amount of "fight clubs" popping up on the internet after this movie came out and just couldn't help but laugh at how much these meathead morons really did not get it. Of all the things you could take away from the movie or the novel, starting an underground boxing club should not be one of them if you actually paid any kind of attention.

I did read the book, but I enjoyed the movie more, possibly because that's just what I saw first. The differences between the two are minimal, but the main thing that pushes the movie ahead of the book for me is the car crash scene.

Tyler: Look at you...look at you! You're fucking pathetic.

Narrator: Why? Why? What are you talking about?

Tyler: Why do you think I blew up your condo?

Narrator: What?

Tyler: Hitting bottom is not a weekend-retreat, it's not a goddamn seminar. Stop trying to controlling everything and just let go. LET GO!

#49 Edited by jakob187 (21665 posts) -

@BionicRadd: I think it's reasons like this that have caused Fight Club to become such a cult hit. People find all this deeper meaning in the ideas of anti-consumerism and what not. Nonetheless, Palahniuk himself has said that it's a love story. It's about Marla and the Narrator falling in love. He's gone on to say something to the effects of (this isn't a direct quote, I cannot find the direct quote, but it is in his foreword of the 2004 reprint of Fight Club) "I could've written a book called Golf Club and the principle concern would've been the same".

Everything else is fluff to make people analyze it for some deeper meaning without focusing on the part that actually matters.

The movie very much plays the same way.

#50 Posted by BionicRadd (617 posts) -

@jakob187 said:

@BionicRadd: I think it's reasons like this that have caused Fight Club to become such a cult hit. People find all this deeper meaning in the ideas of anti-consumerism and what not. Nonetheless, Palahniuk himself has said that it's a love story. It's about Marla and the Narrator falling in love. He's gone on to say something to the effects of (this isn't a direct quote, I cannot find the direct quote, but it is in his foreword of the 2004 reprint of Fight Club) "I could've written a book called Golf Club and the principle concern would've been the same".

Everything else is fluff to make people analyze it for some deeper meaning without focusing on the part that actually matters.

The movie very much plays the same way.

Not to be a dick, but people don't pay attention to it because it wasn't that interesting. I am not a big fan of artists and creators telling people what their stories are about, though. Still, if he had set out to tell the story that I see when I watch it, it would have been terrible and heavy-handed. The idea that a lot of themes that people see in Fight Club were put there without any deliberate thought behind them kind of makes it more awesome.

I get what he's saying, but Marla was by far the least engaging character in that story for me. Still, next time I watch it, I am going to keep that in mind.